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  • Adrianne Kalfopoulou is the author of two poetry collections, most recently Passion Maps (Red Hen Press, 2009). Her poems and essays have appeared in various journals, including Hotel Amerika, Room magazine, and Prairie Schooner. She is on the faculty at Hellenic American University and teaches in the Creative Writing Program at New York University.


  • Beena Kamlani’s fiction won a 2009 Pushcart Prize and has appeared in Identity Lessons and Growing Up Ethnic in America as well as Ploughshares, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Lifted Brow 4 (Australia), and other collections. She is an editor at Viking Penguin and an associate professor of publishing at New York University. Kamlani lives in New York and is completing a novel.


  • Ken N. Kamoche (kenkamoche.com) was born and raised in Kenya. He studied commerce at the University of Nairobi and management at Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He is an academic, journalist, and writer of fiction. Kamoche's collection of short stories, A Fragile Hope (Salt, 2007) was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Best First Book Award. His other stories have appeared in various anthologies, including Hong Kong ID, Dreams, Miracles and Jazz, One World, and New Writing from Africa 2009, as well as several magazines. Kamoche has also been a columnist for Kenyan newspapers. He currently lives in the United Kingdom. His new novel, True Warriors, was first published as a short story in Crossing Borders, a British Council magazine.



  • Zvonko Karanović is a poet and fiction writer born in Niš, Serbia. Like the poets of the Beat generation he takes as his models, he has traveled widely throughout Europe, hitchhiking and often changing jobs. He has worked as a journalist, editor, radio host, DJ, concert organizer, and for thirteen years was the owner of a music store. He has published ten collections of poems and a novel trilogy, The Diary of Deserters


  • Ziaul Karim is executive editor of Jamini, an international arts magazine, and former literary editor of The Daily Star.


  • Persis M. Karim is Professor of English and comparative literature at San Jose State University in California, where she teaches world literature, comparative literature, and creative writing. She is a contributing poet to the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here anthology and has been involved with the project since 2008.



  • Hiromi Kawakami (b. 1958, Tokyo) is one of the most popular and respected writers of fiction in Japan, and she is also known as a literary critic and a provocative essayist. Her first novel, Kamisama (God), was published in 1994. In 1996 she was awarded the Akutagawa Prize for Hebi wo fumu (Tread on a snake) and subsequently won the It? Sei Literature Prize, the Woman Writer's Prize, the Tanizaki Prize. In 2007 she was honored by the Ministry of Education for her novel Manazuru, which was subsequently published in Michael Emmerich's translation (Counterpoint, 2010), and her novel The Briefcase, translated by Allison Markin Powell, is forthcoming from Counterpoint in February 2012. (Adapted from Wikipedia)


  • Israeli author Etgar Keret is known for his television and film work as well as his short stories and children’s book. Several of his stories have been graphically illustrated, and his work has been translated into sixteen different languages. His most recent collection of short stories, The Girl on the Fridge, was published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in April. Keret and his wife, Shira Geffen, codirected Meduzot (Jellyfish), which won the Caméra d’Or at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival as well as two other directorial awards. The movie Wristcutters, now available on DVD, is based on Keret’s story “Kneller’s Happy Campers.” Keret currently resides in Tel Aviv with his wife and son. For more Keret fiction, look for “The Pricking” in our next issue, plus an exclusive interview.



  • Yousef Khanfar (www.yousefkhanfar.com) is an award-winning author and photographer of Palestinian origin whose work has been collected and exhibited in galleries, cultural centers, and museums worldwide. He is the author of three books, Voices of Light (2000), In Search of Peace (2006), and Invisible Eve, forthcoming from Rizzoli in spring 2013. In 2003 Khanfar was selected as one of the world’s top landscape photographers by RotoVision in London, and his work is included in the permanent collection of the International Photography Hall of Fame, where he serves as exhibits chairman. In 2009 the Fulbright Center for Peace in Washington, D.C., selected In Search of Peace as the honor book for the Global Symposium of Peaceful Nations.

     



  • Photo by Kevin Platt

    Semyon Khanin was born in Riga, Latvia, in 1970. He is the author of two collections of poetry in Russian, Tol'ko chto (2003; Just now) and Opushchennye podrobnosti(2008; Missed details). His poetry has been translated into Latvian, English, Czech, German, Italian, Swedish, Estonian, and Ukranian. He is a participant in the literary project Orbita and editor of the almanac by the same name.


  • Maya Khosla received the Dorothy Brunsman Poetry Prize for Keel Bone (2003) and awards from Poets & Writers, the Ludwig Vogelstein Foundation, and the Headlands Center for the Arts. Her poetry has appeared in Fog and Wood Smoke, Water: Culture, Politics, Management, and various journals, including Poem, Prairie Schooner, and Wisconsin Review. New poems are forthcoming in The Harper Collins Anthology of English Poetry by Indians.


  • Max Kidruk has written several travelogues and technothrillers, including Bot



  • Kim Kyŏnguk (b. 1971, Kwangju, South Korea) earned his bachelor’s in English and master’s in Korean literature from Seoul National University. Since his debut story, “An Outsider,” won the Writer’s World prize for best new writer in 1993, Kim has published six story collections and five novels. One of the most prolific writers and astute observers of contemporary life in South Korea, Kim has received numerous prestigious literary awards such as the Hyŏndae and the Tongin prizes. WLT’s brief conversation with Kim appears in the January 2013 issue.



  • Lucas Klein, former radio DJ and union organizer, is a writer, translator, and editor whose work has appeared in Jacket, Rain Taxi, CLEAR, and PMLA, and from Fordham, Black Widow, and New Directions. An assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong, his translation Notes on the Mosquito: Selected Poems of Xi Chuan 西川 won the 2013 Lucien Stryk Prize and was shortlisted for the Best Translated Book Award in poetry (see xichuanpoetry.com). He is translating Tang dynasty poet Li Shangyin 李商隱 and seminal contemporary poet Mang Ke 芒克.


  • Erwin Koch, the author of seven books, is a Swiss journalist. He is the two-time recipient of the Egon Erwin Kisch Prize for German-language journalism (1988 and 1996); his carefully constructed, dystopian first novel, Sara tanzt (Sara dances), was awarded the Mara Cassens Prize for the best first novel of 2003. Notable among his works are the riveting novel Der Flambeur (The flimflam flambeur), based on the difficult life of a Swiss-German entrepreneur, and the finely wrought journalistic collection Vor der Tagesschau, an einem späten Sonntagnachmittag (Late Sunday afternoon, just before the news). His most recent publication is a collaborative work about a Swiss monastery with the photographer Giorgio von Arb.


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