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  • Laila Lalami was born and raised in Morocco. Her work has appeared in the Boston Globe, the Los Angeles Times, the Nation, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of a British Council Fellowship and a Fulbright Fellowship. She was short-listed for the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2006. Her debut collection of short stories, Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits (Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill), was published in 2005 and has since been translated into six languages. Her first novel, Secret Son, was published by Algonquin in spring 2009. She is currently Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of California, Riverside.



  • Photo: Glodean Champion Photography

    Quraysh Ali Lansana is author of the poetry collections Mystic Turf, They Shall Run: Harriet Tubman Poems, Southside Rain; three poetry chapbooks, bloodsoil, Greatest Hits: 1995–2005, and cockroach children: corner poems and street psalms; and a children’s book, The Big World. A former director of Chicago State University’s Gwendolyn Brooks Center, he currently teaches at Chicago State and also for the Red Earth Creative Writing MFA Program at Oklahoma City University.


  • Aurelio Francos Lauredo is the author of seven books on Hispanic memory in Cuba. 



  • Dorianne Laux’s most recent books of poems are The Book of Men (2011), winner of the Paterson Prize, and Facts about the Moon (2007), recipient of the Oregon Book Award and shortlisted for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize. Laux is also author of Awake, What We Carry, Smoke, The Book of Women, and Dark Charms. Coauthor of The Poet’s Companion, she teaches poetry at Pacific University’s low-residency MFA program and in the MFA program at North Carolina State University.


  • Li-Young Lee’s previous verse collections include Rose (1986), winner of the Delmore Schwartz Memorial Award;The City in Which I Love You (1991), the 1990 Lamont Poetry Selection; and Book of My Nights (2001). He is also the author of a memoir, The Winged Seed: A Remembrance (1995), which received an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation, and Breaking the Alabaster Jar: Conversations with Li-Young Lee, forthcoming from BOA Editions in fall 2006. Lee’s honors include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lannan Foundation, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. As a juror for the 2006 Neustadt International Prize for Literature, he nominated poet Gerald Stern for the award. Born in 1957 in Jakarta, Indonesia, of Chinese parents, Lee fled Indonesia with his family in 1959 after his father spent a year as a political prisoner in President Sukarno’s jails. Between 1959 and 1964 the Lee family traveled throughout Hong Kong, Macau, and Japan before settling in the United States. Lee currently lives in Chicago, Illinois, with his wife, Donna, and their two children.


  • A WLT contributing editor, Michael Lee is a professor of music (musicology) at the University of Oklahoma.


  • Mark Leenhouts is the author of Leaving the World to Enter the World: Han Shaogong and Chinese Root-Seeking Literature (2005) and the translator of several works of Han Shaogong into Dutch, notably A Dictionary of Maqiao. Leenhouts is a literary critic for a leading Dutch newspaper and was editor and cofounder of Het trage vuur (Slow Fire), a Dutch magazine for Chinese literature. His other translations include work by Su Tong, Bi Feiyu, Yan Lianke, and Bai Xianyong. Currently he is working on Qian Zhongshu's Fortress Besieged and Cao Xueqin's Dream of the Red Chamber.


  • Lisa Lercher was born in 1965 in Hartberg, Austria; educated in Graz; and has lived in Vienna since 1989. She has worked with women's shelters and as a lecturer at the Universities of Vienna, Klagenfurt, and Graz. Following the publication of books and articles with an emphasis on violence against women and children, she began writing crime novels and short thrillers in 2001. Her thriller Die Mutprobe (2009; Test of courage) was filmed and broadcast in 2010. Her latest novel is Zornige Väter (2010; Angry fathers).


  • Alan Lightman is a physicist, novelist, and essayist. He was educated at Princeton University and at the California Institute of Technology, where he received a PhD in theoretical physics. He has served on the faculties of Harvard University and MIT and was the first person to receive dual faculty appointments at MIT in science and in the humanities. Lightman is the author of five novels, two collections of essays, a book-length narrative poem, and several books on science. His novel Einstein’s Dreams was an international best-seller and has been translated into thirty languages. His novel The Diagnosis was a finalist for the National Book Award in fiction.


  • Ryan F. Long is Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Oklahoma. His research focuses on culture and politics in Mexico, especially the late twentieth century. He has published articles on a range of topics, including the conflict in Chiapas, Mexican cinema, and a number of writers, such as Ignacio Manuel Altamirano, Álvaro Mutis, and Roberto Bolaño. His book, Fictions of Totality: The Mexican Novel, 1968, and the National-Popular State, was published in 2008 by Purdue University Press.