Author | R

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z
  • Alon Raab is a writer, co-editor of The Global Game: Writers on Soccer, and a lifelong lover of bicycles.



  • Juan Hernández Ramírez is a renowned Nahua poet from the community of Colatlán in the municipality of Ixhuatlán de Madero, Veracruz, Mexico. His life in the Huasteca has had an indelible impression on his poetry. He identifies this founding experience as key in his literature and deep respect for the earth. Hernández Ramírez was awarded the Premio Nezahualcoyotl for his book of poetry Chikome Xochitl in 2006. In 2008 he received the continental prize Canto de América for Tlatlatok tetl (Stone on fire). He has published five books of poetry and has numerous forthcoming publications.



  • Raja Rao (1908-2006) was born in Hassan, in what is now Narnataka in South India. Though his father taught Kannada at the college where he worked, Rao studied in France for his post-graduate studies and most of his publications were written in the English language. His first stories began appearing in various magazines and journals in 1933, and he published his first book in 1938. Upon his return to India in 1939, Rao became involved in the nationalist movement emerging there. From 1966-1983, he relocated back to the United States and taught Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin.


  • Moniru Ravanipour is one of the most prominent writers of postrevolutionary Iran. She is the author of several distinguished novels, including Heart of Steel, Gypsy by Fire, and The Drowned. Her collections of short stories, Kanizu and Satan’s Stone, were translated and published in the United States. A former Brown University fellow at the International Writers Project, Ravanipour now lives in Las Vegas and is affiliated with the Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada.



  • Photo © Doug Wolf

    Essayist Nichole L. Reber explores form and gravity through words. Her award-winning writing on art, architecture, travel, literary criticism, and cults has been published in EastLit, Atticus Review, and elsewhere.


  • Cuban poet, essayist, and literary critic Roberto Fernández Retamar is the president of the Casa de las Américas and was the 2002 Puterbaugh Fellow (see WLT, Summer/Autumn 2002). 



  • José Luis Rivas (b. 1950, Tuxpan, Veracruz) was elected to the Mexican Academy of Language in 2013. A prolifically published poet, translator, and essayist, he has been awarded many national literary prizes for his books of poetry and for his translations of major poets from Europe, the US, and the Caribbean. The poem above is taken from Por mor del mar (2002).


  • Roger Robinson (www.roger-robinson.com) is emeritus professor of English at Victoria University, New Zealand, and senior writer for Running Times. He set masters records at the Boston and New York marathons. His books include Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature, Running in Literature, and the recently republished Heroes and Sparrows: A Celebration of Running.



  • New Mexico Centennial poet laureate Levi Romero is the author of Sagrado: A Photopoetics across the Chicano Homeland, A Poetry of Remembrance: New and Rejected Works, and In the Gathering of Silence. He is from the Embudo Valley of northern New Mexico. He teaches in the Chicana/o Studies program at the University of New Mexico. 



  • Photo by Jamie Borland

    Mira Rosenthal is the author of The Local World and translator of two books by Polish poet Tomasz Różycki. Her work has received numerous awards, including an NEA Fellowship, a Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University, a PEN/Heim Translation Grant, and the Northern California Book Award. She is assistant professor of poetry writing at Cal Poly.


  • Jacques Roubaud (b. 1932) became a member of the oulipo (Workshop of Potential Literature) group in 1966 and was nominated by Marcel Bénabou for the Neustadt International Prize for Literature in 2008. His most recent book to be translated into English is Mathematics: A Novel (2012).



  • Adam Rovner (www.adamrovner.com) is an associate professor of English and Jewish literature at the University of Denver. His articles, essays, translations, and interviews have appeared in numerous publications. His narrative history of the Territorialist movement, In the Shadow of Zion: Promised Lands before Israel, was published by NYU Press in 2014.



  • Photo by Slav Zatoka

    Tomasz Różycki rose to both critical and popular prominence as an important voice of his generation in Poland when his fifth book, Twelve Stations, won the Kościelski Prize in 2004. Różycki was first introduced to anglophone readers with Mira Rosenthal’s translation of a selected poems, followed by his sonnet collection Colonies, which won the 2014 Northern California Book Award and was shortlisted for the International Griffin Poetry Prize and the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize.



  • Aaron Rudolph is an instructor of composition at Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma. He authored the collection Sacred Things (Bridge Burner’s Publishing, 2002) and has poems in the anthologies Two Southwests (Visual Arts Collective, 2008) and Ain’t Nobody That Can Sing Like Me (Mongrel Empire Press, 2010).