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  • Pia Tafdrup (b. 1952, Copenhagen, www.tafdrup.com) is a Danish poet and writer and member of the Danish Academy and the European Academy of Poetry. Among several prizes, she received the Nordic Council's Literature Prize in 1999 and the Nordic Prize in 2006 from the Swedish Academy. Tafdrup has published fourteen collections of poetry, including Spring Tide (Forest Books, 1989), Queen's Gate (Bloodaxe, 2001), and Tarkovsky's Horses (Bloodaxe, 2010). She has also published a statement of her poetics, Walking over the Water, two plays, and two novels. Her poems are translated into more than thirty languages. English translations of her poems have been published in more than sixty literary journals in the UK, US, Canada, and Australia. She is profiled in Thousandborn: The Poet PiaTafdrup (Cosmo Film a/s).



  • Abdellah Taïa (b. 1973, Rabat) is the first Moroccan and Arab writer to publicly declare his homosexuality. Editions du Seuil has published five of his books, including L’armée du salut (2006; Eng. Salvation Army, 2009), Une mélancolie arabe (2008; Eng. An Arab Melancholy, 2012), and Lettres à un jeune marocain (2009). His novel Le jour du Roi was awarded the prestigious French Prix de Flore in 2010, and his latest novel, Infidèles, came out in 2012. Taïa’s work has been translated into several languages, and he also appeared in Rémi Lange’s film The Road to Love (2001). His American publisher is Semiotext(e).


  • Phyllis Taoua is the author of Forms of Protest: Anti-Colonialism and Avant-Gardes in Africa, the Caribbean, and France (2002) and is completing her second book, Africa from African Perspectives: Their Voices, Our World and the Difference It Makes. Other publications have appeared in The Cambridge Companion to the African Novel, Transition, SubStance, Research in African Literatures, Cahier d’Études Africaines, and Journal of African Cultural Studies. In 2006 she was the recipient of a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation award and Resident Fellow at the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University.


  • Raymond Taras is Willy Brandt Professor at Sweden's Malmö University for 2010–11. He was director of Tulane University's world literature program before Hurricane Katrina forced its closure. He is the author of numerous scholarly books on nationalism and identities in Europe.



  • Víctor Téran was born in Juchitán de Zaragoza in 1958. His work has been published extensively in magazines and anthologies throughout Mexico (see WLT, May 2009, 24–25). Since 2000, he has also appeared in anthologies such as Reversible Monuments (Copper Canyon, 2002) and Words of the True Peoples (University of Texas Press, 2005).



  • Photo by Dragan Radovancevic

    ko ko thett is a poet by choice and a Burmese by chance. In between he is a poetry translator, editor, and anthologist of contemporary Burmese poetry (see WLT, January 2012, 35–41). His first anthology, Bones Will Crow: Fifteen Contemporary Burmese Poets, was published in the US by Northern Illinois University Press. He lives in Vienna and writes in both Burmese and English.



  • Sergej Timofejev is a member of Orbita, a creative collective of Russian poets and artists, as well as a Riga-based journalist, translator, and DJ. Since the late 1980s, he has published in the journals Rodnik, Mitin zhurnal, Vavilon, Znamia, and others. A pioneer of video poetry in Russian, his first video poem, "Orchestra Rehearsal" (1995), may be seen on YouTube. Timofejev is the author of six books of poetry, three of which were published in Latvia and three in Russia. He was short-listed for the Andrei Belyi prize in 2002. His poetry has been translated into several languages.


  • Julia Tindell is a junior English major at Gustavus Adolphus College. When she graduates, she hopes to obtain a PhD in English and become a college professor. She currently works as a tutor in the Writing Center at Gustavus and plans to study abroad next fall at Oxford University.



  • Natalia Toledo has written four books of poetry and two of prose, all bilingual (Zapotec/Spanish). She has read her poetry in Latin America and the United States as well as Europe and Asia. Her work as a jewelry and clothing designer and chef reiterates the lively imagery of her poetry.



  • Tomas Tranströmer (born 15 April 1931 in Stockholm) is a Swedish writer, poet and translator, who has sold thousands of volumes in his native country, and whose poetry has been translated into over sixty languages. He has published ten volumes of poetry in Swedish, from 17 dikter (17 Poems; 1954) to For levande och doda (1989; Eng. "For Living and Dead"). He won the 1990 Neustadt Prize.



  • Photo by Daniel Boud

    Mark Tredinnick is a poet, nature writer, and essayist. The winner in 2011 of the Montreal Poetry Prize and in 2012 of the Cardiff Poetry Prize, he is the editor of Australian Love Poems and the author of Australia’s Wild Weather, The Blue Plateau, Fire Diary, and eight other books. His new book of poems, Bluewren Cantos, will appear in early 2014. He is a founding member of the Kangaloon Group of Concerned Artists and Scholars. Read more at his website www.marktredinnick.com.au.


  • James Tsaaior, an Associate Professor, is the chair of the Mass Media and Writing Department, School of Media and Communication, Pan-African University, Lagos, and Director of Academic Planning at the university, where he teaches creative writing and media studies. He was a visiting research fellow, Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge, UK.


  • Since 2003 John Turnbull has edited The Global Game (www.theglobalgame.com), a website of world soccer culture. He is coeditor of The Global Game: Writers on Soccer (2008) and lives in Atlanta. His Pushcart Prize–nominated essay "Alone in the Woods: The Literary Landscape of Soccer's 'Last Defender'" appeared in the July 2010 issue of WLT.


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