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  • Adelle Waldman is a novelist and writer for Slate, Vogue, and Gawker. She is best known for her first novel, "The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.", which was named one of 2013's best books by The New Yorker, The Economist, NPR, BookPage, and The Guardian, among many others.


  • Conrad Walters is a journalist at The Sydney Morning Herald.


  • Jesmyn Ward is an American author known best for two novels, Where the Line Bleeds and Salvage the Bones, that are set on the Mississippi coast. She currently teaches at the University of South Alabama.


  • Jean-Luc Wauthier (b. 1950) is a Belgian poet, essayist, and editor of the Journal des Poètes.


  • Sylvie Weil is the author of several adult and young adult fiction works. Raised in Paris, she has taught French literature at Barnard, Bennington, and Hunter Colleges, and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.


  • John Weir is the author of two novels, The Irreversible Decline of Eddie Socket and What I Did Wrong.



  • Karen J. Weyant’s work has appeared in Cave Wall, Conte, Copper Nickel, Spillway, Sugar House Review, and River Styx. She is the author of two poetry chapbooks, Stealing Dust (Finishing Line Press, 2009) and Wearing Heels in the Rust Belt (Main Street Rag). She lives and writes in Pennsylvania but teaches at Jamestown Community College in Jamestown, New York. She blogs at thescrapperpoet.wordpress.com


  • Steven F. White is the author of Modern Nicaraguan Poetry: Dialogues with France and the United States and co-translated Rubén Darío: Selected Writings as well as Seven Trees against the Dying Light by Pablo Antonio Cuadra. He is co-author of Culture and Customs of Nicaragua and recently published his selected poems in Spanish, Bajo la palabra de las plantas: (poesía selecta 1979–2009). He teaches as a Latin Americanist at St. Lawrence University.


  • Zoë Wicomb (b. 1948) is a South African novelist and short story writer. She is known for works that examine apartheid, race, and the complexity of human relationships.



  • Photo by Beowulf Sheehan

    Vera B. Williams (born January 28, 1927) is an American children's writer and illustrator. Her best known work, A Chair for My Mother, has won multiple awards and was featured on the children's television show Reading Rainbow. For her lifetime contribution as a children's illustrator she was U.S. nominee in 2004 for the biennial, international Hans Christian Andersen Award, the highest recognition available to creators of children's books.



  • C. K. Williams (born Charles Kenneth Williams on November 2, 1936) is an American poet, critic and translator. Williams has won nearly every major poetry award. Flesh and Blood won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1987. Repair (1999) won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, was a National Book Award finalist and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. The Singing won the National Book Award, 2003 and in 2005 Williams received the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize. The 2012 film Tar related aspects of Williams' life using his poetry.


  • WLT intern, Sara Wilson is earning a master’s in literary and cultural studies at the University of Oklahoma. Her interests are postmodern and contemporary American fiction and poetry.


  • Harmen Wind (1945-2010) was a Dutch poet and writer.


  • WLT

  • Virginia Euwer Wolff was born in 1937 in Oregon. After graduating from Smith College, she taught school, reared two children, and attended graduate school in four states before beginning to write for young readers in her mid-forties. Her novels focus on a learning-disabled sixteen-year-old boy (Probably Still Nick Swansen, 1988); twelve-year-old violinist Allegra Leah Shapiro (The Mozart Season, 1991); two sixth-grade softball teams in 1949 (Bat 6, 1998); and an unmarried teen mother, her two children, and their babysitter (Make Lemonade, 1993; True Believer, 2001; and This Full House, 2009).

    Wolff has won the National Book Award, the Jane Addams Peace Award and Honor, two Golden Kites, the Michael L. Printz Honor, two Oregon Book Awards, and, most recently, the Phoenix Book Award from the Children's Literature Association.

    She has lived in New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C., but now reads, writes, and plays chamber music in Oregon.



  • Photo by David Shankbone

    Carolyn D. "C. D." Wright (born January 6, 1949) is an American poet.


  • Christiane Wyrwa studied German and English literature at Göttingen, Durham GB, and Berlin, where she took a PhD in 1981. With her husband, Matthias Klein, she edited Kuno Raeber’s Collected Works in seven volumes from 2002 to 2010.