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  • Brian Fanelli’s poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in a number of magazines and journals, most recently Oklahoma Review, Spillway, Boston Literary Magazine, Portland Review, and Third Wednesday. Fanelli is the author of one chapbook, Front Man (Big Table Publishing), and the full-length collection All That Remains, forthcoming soon from Unbound Content. Prior to working as a full-time English instructor at Lackawanna College, Fanelli worked a number of jobs, including country clerk, factory worker, and adjunct instructor. He has an MFA from Wilkes University and is currently a PhD student at SUNY Binghamton.


  • A child prodigy in China, Liu Fang is recognized as one of the most eminent pipa soloists as well as a sensitive performer on the guzheng. She has collaborated with world-class musicians from various traditions and has released eleven solo and collaborative albums. She now lives in Canada.



  • Nuruddin Farah (b. 1945) was born in the Italian-ruled southern region of Somalia, Baidoa. His mother was a traditional storyteller, and his father was a merchant who later worked for the British government as an interpreter. Farah lived in a multilingual environment and learned to speak Somali, Amharic, English, Italian, and Arabic. When he began to write, Farah chose English as the language of his works. His first novel, From A Crooked Rib (1970), depicts the authoritarian role of patriarchy in African society and earned Farah praise as a "male feminist." The publication of his second novel, A Naked Needle (1976), angered the Somalian dictatorial regime and finally forced Farah into exile after receiving death threats. Farah would not return to live in Somalia again, but his lifelong pursuit is to keep his country through his writing.



  • Photo © www.mahmag.org

    Forugh Farrokhzad (1935–1967) was an Iranian poet and filmmaker. Her published works include The Captive, The Wall, Rebellion, Reborn, and Let Us Believe in the Dawn of the Cold Season. She broke with many traditional conventions and thus exercised an immeasurably important influence on modern Iranian poetry.



  • Feyziyye was born in 1982. She works as a newspaper journalist in Baku. She has published one book of poetry, Message. Her poetry takes up themes of war and displacement.



  • Photo by Radek Kobietski

    Julia Fiedorczuk (b. 1975) is a Polish poet, prose writer, translator, and lecturer in American literature at the University of Warsaw. She has published five books of poetry, a collection of short stories, and two novels. Her Pushcart-nominated poem “Lands and Oceans” appeared in the November 2014 issue of WLT. Her most recent book, Nieważkość, was nominated for the Nike Prize. Oxygen, a volume of selected poetry translated by Bill Johnston, is forthcoming from Zephyr Press in 2017.



  • Elizabeth Fifer is professor of English at Lehigh University, where she teaches contemporary world and American literature. She is currently writing about the use of repetition in The Patrick Melrose Novels, by Edward St. Aubyn.


  • Nancy Finn teaches dramatic literature and Irish studies in the English Department at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and theater studies in the Performing Arts Department at Emerson College. She received her PhD in theater from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her research interests include modern and contemporary Irish theater and drama, contemporary women playwrights, and theater historiography. She is also an actor and dramaturge. She is currently writing a monograph on the work of Marina Carr. 


  • A native of Naples, Peppe Fiore lives and works in Rome. In addition to Nessuno è indispensabile, he is the author of two short-story collections and a second novel, La futura classe dirigente (The future ruling class). His interest in writing about the world of work, he says, is tied to the way “working life becomes a useful framework for understanding how we function as a species.”



  • Will Firth (www.willfirth.de) was born in 1965 in Newcastle, Australia. He studied German and Slavic languages in Canberra, Zagreb, and Moscow. Since 1991 he has lived in Berlin, where he works as a translator of literature and the humanities (from Russian, Macedonian, and all variants of Serbo-Croat). His best-received translations of recent years have been Robert Perišić‘s Our Man in Iraq, Andrej Nikolaidis’s Till Kingdom Come, and Faruk Šehić’s Quiet Flows the Una



  • Dolores Flores-Silva, from the Mexican Gulf state of Veracruz, teaches Latin American literature and culture at Roanoke College. She is co-author of The Cross and the Sword in the Works of Rosario Ferré and Mayra Montero (2009) and has written on topics such as Mexican and Hispano-Caribbean literatures and cultures, Chicano Studies, and—most recently—the US South. Her publications as a poet, playwright, and translator traverse languages and borders.



  • Photo: Don J. Usner

    Carolyn Forché’s first volume, Gathering the Tribes, winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize, was followed by The Country Between Us, The Angel of History, and Blue Hour. Her latest collection, In the Lateness of the World, is forthcoming in 2017. She has translated Mahmoud Darwish, Claribel Alegría, and Robert Desnos. Her famed international anthology, Against Forgetting: Twentieth-Century Poetry of Witness (1993), has been praised by Nelson Mandela as “itself a blow against tyranny, against prejudice, against injustice,” and was followed by the anthology Poetry of Witness: The Tradition in English, 1500–2001 (2014). In 1998 she received the Edita & Ira Morris Hiroshima Foundation for Peace & Culture Award in Stockholm for her human rights advocacy and the preservation of memory and culture. She was also a finalist for the 2016 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. She holds a University Professorship at Georgetown University, where she directs the Lannan Center for Poetics and Social Practice. She is currently at work on a memoir and a fifth collection of poetry.


  • Ru Freeman (www.rufreeman.com) is a Sri Lankan–born writer and activist. Her first novel, A Disobedient Girl, was published in the United States and translated into eight foreign languages. Her political journalism appears internationally in English and in Arabic translation. An excerpt of Freeman's writing appeared in the September 2010 issue of WLT.



  • Max Frisch (1911-1991) was a Swiss novelist and playwright. Frisch's father suddenly passed away while he was studying at the University of Zurich, and Frisch had to abandon his studies and take up a job as a journalist, thus beginning his life-long career as a writer. His first novel was published in 1934, but his most active writing period occurred during the 1950s and 60s. Major themes in Frisch's works include identity, individuality, and political commitment. He is the laureate of the 1986 Neustadt Prize.


  • Sonja Fritzsche is Professor of German and Eastern European Studies at Illinois Wesleyan University. Her publications include Science-Fiction Literature in East Germany (2006) and The Liverpool Companion to World Science-Fiction Film (2014).



  • Photo by Alon Porat

    Tahel Frosh (b. 1977) has degrees in law and psychology and is currently working on a doctorate in literature. Her debut poetry collection, Betsa (Avarice. Jerusalem, Mossad Bialik, 2014), from which these poems have been chosen, was published in 2014 to wide acclaim. She also co-edited the anthology Avodat gilui (Unveiling work) and is a member of the art and social justice collective Cultural Guerrilla.



  • Danielle Fuller is a senior lecturer at the University of Birmingham (England).