Authors

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  • Quinn Carpenter Weedon is an advanced poetry student in Oklahoma City University’s undergraduate English program.



  • Photo © R. Espinoza Rios

    Sylvie Weil grew up in Paris and earned her degrees in classics and French literature at the Sorbonne. She is the author of numerous works of literary fiction and memoir, including At Home with André and Simone Weil and also a series of three young-adult novels set in Champagne at the time of the first Crusade. The first of this trilogy, Le mazal d’Elvina, won the Prix Sorcières, one of the most prestigious prizes awarded in France for the best novel for young people.


  • Allison Weintraub, a WLT intern, is working on degrees in English and professional writing at the University of Oklahoma.


  • John Weir is the author of two novels, The Irreversible Decline of Eddie Socket and What I Did Wrong.


  • Melissa Weiss is a WLT intern and MA student at the University of Oklahoma with an interest in contemporary Indian literature.



  • Janice Weizman is the author of The Wayward Moon, an award-winning historical novel set in the ninth-century Middle East. Her writing and translations have appeared or are forthcoming in World Literature Today, Lilith, Consequence, the Jerusalem Report, and the Tel Aviv Review of Books. Originally from Toronto, Weizman has lived in Israel for over thirty years.



  • Adrian Nathan West is the translator of numerous works of contemporary European literature and author of The Aesthetics of Degradation, forthcoming from Repeater Books. He lives between Spain and the United States with the cinema critic Beatriz Leal Riesco.



  • Karen J. Weyant’s work has appeared in Cave Wall, Conte, Copper Nickel, Spillway, Sugar House Review, and River Styx. She is the author of two poetry chapbooks, Stealing Dust (Finishing Line Press, 2009) and Wearing Heels in the Rust Belt (Main Street Rag). She lives and writes in Pennsylvania but teaches at Jamestown Community College in Jamestown, New York. She blogs at thescrapperpoet.wordpress.com


  • Steven F. White is the author of Modern Nicaraguan Poetry: Dialogues with France and the United States and co-translated Rubén Darío: Selected Writings as well as Seven Trees against the Dying Light by Pablo Antonio Cuadra. He is co-author of Culture and Customs of Nicaragua and recently published his selected poems in Spanish, Bajo la palabra de las plantas: (poesía selecta 1979–2009). He teaches as a Latin Americanist at St. Lawrence University.



  • Hazel White’s new poetry manuscript, Vigilance Is No Orchard, is a finalist for the 2015 National Poetry Series. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in VERSE, Denver Quarterly, Fence, and New American Writing. She and Denise Newman received a Creative Work Fund grant for a poetry installation next year at the UC Berkeley Botanical Garden.


  • Zoë Wicomb (b. 1948) is a South African novelist and short story writer. She is known for works that examine apartheid, race, and the complexity of human relationships.



  • C. K. Williams (born Charles Kenneth Williams on November 2, 1936) is an American poet, critic and translator. Williams has won nearly every major poetry award. Flesh and Blood won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1987. Repair (1999) won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, was a National Book Award finalist and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. The Singing won the National Book Award, 2003 and in 2005 Williams received the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize. The 2012 film Tar related aspects of Williams' life using his poetry.



  • Alison Williams is a writer and translator, currently in the MFA/MA (English) program at Chapman University. She is editor-in-chief of Chapman’s graduate interdisciplinary journal, Anastamos, and has been a reader for the journal Tabula Poetica. Her interview series Storytellers is a collection of multimedia talks with creative and innovative minds. Alison is founder and CEO of the international media consultancy Raconteur.



  • Photo by Beowulf Sheehan

    Vera B. Williams (born January 28, 1927) is an American children's writer and illustrator. Her best known work, A Chair for My Mother, has won multiple awards and was featured on the children's television show Reading Rainbow. For her lifetime contribution as a children's illustrator she was U.S. nominee in 2004 for the biennial, international Hans Christian Andersen Award, the highest recognition available to creators of children's books.


  • Violet Wilson is an intern at World Literature Today. She is also an exchange student from England, where she studies American literature and creative writing. 


  • WLT intern, Sara Wilson is earning a master’s in literary and cultural studies at the University of Oklahoma. Her interests are postmodern and contemporary American fiction and poetry.


  • Harmen Wind (1945-2010) was a Dutch poet and writer.



  • Tanaya Winder is an entrepreneur, motivational speaker, and performance poet from the Southern Ute, Duckwater Shoshone, and Pyramid Lake Paiute Nations. She graduated from Stanford University, and her first book, Words Like Love, was published in 2015. Tanaya founded Dream Warriors, an Indigenous artist management company.


  • Virginia Euwer Wolff was born in 1937 in Oregon. After graduating from Smith College, she taught school, reared two children, and attended graduate school in four states before beginning to write for young readers in her mid-forties. Her novels focus on a learning-disabled sixteen-year-old boy (Probably Still Nick Swansen, 1988); twelve-year-old violinist Allegra Leah Shapiro (The Mozart Season, 1991); two sixth-grade softball teams in 1949 (Bat 6, 1998); and an unmarried teen mother, her two children, and their babysitter (Make Lemonade, 1993; True Believer, 2001; and This Full House, 2009).

    Wolff has won the National Book Award, the Jane Addams Peace Award and Honor, two Golden Kites, the Michael L. Printz Honor, two Oregon Book Awards, and, most recently, the Phoenix Book Award from the Children's Literature Association.

    She has lived in New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C., but now reads, writes, and plays chamber music in Oregon.



  • Photo: Tereza Cerenova

    Born and raised in Hong Kong, Jennifer Wong studied English at Oxford University and has a creative writing PhD from Oxford Brookes University. She is the author of Goldfish (2013) and teaches part-time at City Lit and Oxford Brookes.



  • Photo by Nitch Photography

    Alison Wong is a fourth-generation New Zealander living in Geelong, Australia. Her poetry collection, Cup, was shortlisted for Best First Book for Poetry at the 2007 Montana New Zealand Book Awards, and her poetry was selected for Best New Zealand Poems 2006, 2007, and 2015. Her novel, As the Earth Turns Silver, won the 2010 New Zealand Post Book Award for Fiction and was shortlisted for the 2010 Australian Prime Minister’s Literary Awards. She is working on another novel and a memoir about New Zealand, Australia, and China.



  • Karenne Wood, an enrolled member of the Monacan Indian Nation, holds an MFA in poetry and a PhD in linguistic anthropology. She is the author of two poetry collections, Markings on Earth (2000) and Weaving the Boundary (2016). Her poems have appeared in such journals as the Kenyon Review, Orion, and Shenandoah.



  • From his initial appearance in the Langston Hughes–edited anthology New Negro Poets U.S.A. (1964), Jay Wright (b. 1935, Albuquerque) has published fourteen volumes of poetry and been awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, the American Book Award, and Yale’s Bollingen Prize. Key works include Transfigurations: Collected Poems (2000) and The Guide Signs (2007), both from LSU Press. His collection Boleros was translated into Spanish and published by the University of Veracruz in 2005.



  • Photo by David Shankbone

    Carolyn D. "C. D." Wright (born January 6, 1949) is an American poet.


  • Christiane Wyrwa studied German and English literature at Göttingen, Durham GB, and Berlin, where she took a PhD in 1981. With her husband, Matthias Klein, she edited Kuno Raeber’s Collected Works in seven volumes from 2002 to 2010.



  • Xi Xi (the pen name of Cheung Yin) has written more than thirty books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. One of Hong Kong’s most beloved and prolific authors, she has won numerous international awards, most recently the 2019 Newman Prize for Chinese Literature.



  • Xiao An (b. 1964) is often regarded as a “poet’s poet” in China. One of the few women in the experimental poetry group feifei, meaning “neither/nor,” she has been working as a nurse in a psychiatric hospital for twenty years while steadily publishing poetry. Her writing is influenced by classical Chinese poetry but has a contemporary feel in its themes and sensibility.



  • PHOTO: Paul Hilton

    Xu Xi (@xuxiwriter) is the author of fourteen books, most recently This Fish Is Fowl: Essays of Being (2019). An Indonesian-Chinese-American diehard transnational, she splits her life, unevenly, between the state of New York and the rest of the world.



  • Min Yang is an assistant professor of Chinese Studies, Department of World Languages and Cultures, Bowling Green State University. Her research interests include trauma studies, contemporary Chinese literature, and visual culture.



  • Yi Sha, born in Chengdu in 1966, is considered one of China’s foremost avant-garde writers. He has published over twenty books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction; his influential online column, New Century Poetry Canon, recommends a poem a day to a wide readership throughout the Chinese-speaking world.


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