Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

  • Alison Williams is a writer and translator, currently in the MFA/MA (English) program at Chapman University. She is editor-in-chief of Chapman’s graduate interdisciplinary journal, Anastamos, and has been a reader for the journal Tabula Poetica. Her interview series Storytellers is a collection of multimedia talks with creative and innovative minds. Alison is founder and CEO of the international media consultancy Raconteur.


  • Violet Wilson is an intern at World Literature Today. She is also an exchange student from England, where she studies American literature and creative writing. 


  • WLT intern, Sara Wilson is earning a master’s in literary and cultural studies at the University of Oklahoma. Her interests are postmodern and contemporary American fiction and poetry.


  • Harmen Wind (1945-2010) was a Dutch poet and writer.



  • Tanaya Winder is an entrepreneur, motivational speaker, and performance poet from the Southern Ute, Duckwater Shoshone, and Pyramid Lake Paiute Nations. She graduated from Stanford University, and her first book, Words Like Love, was published in 2015. Tanaya founded Dream Warriors, an Indigenous artist management company.


  • Virginia Euwer Wolff was born in 1937 in Oregon. After graduating from Smith College, she taught school, reared two children, and attended graduate school in four states before beginning to write for young readers in her mid-forties. Her novels focus on a learning-disabled sixteen-year-old boy (Probably Still Nick Swansen, 1988); twelve-year-old violinist Allegra Leah Shapiro (The Mozart Season, 1991); two sixth-grade softball teams in 1949 (Bat 6, 1998); and an unmarried teen mother, her two children, and their babysitter (Make Lemonade, 1993; True Believer, 2001; and This Full House, 2009).

    Wolff has won the National Book Award, the Jane Addams Peace Award and Honor, two Golden Kites, the Michael L. Printz Honor, two Oregon Book Awards, and, most recently, the Phoenix Book Award from the Children's Literature Association.

    She has lived in New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C., but now reads, writes, and plays chamber music in Oregon.



  • Photo by Nitch Photography

    Alison Wong is a fourth-generation New Zealander living in Geelong, Australia. Her poetry collection, Cup, was shortlisted for Best First Book for Poetry at the 2007 Montana New Zealand Book Awards, and her poetry was selected for Best New Zealand Poems 2006, 2007, and 2015. Her novel, As the Earth Turns Silver, won the 2010 New Zealand Post Book Award for Fiction and was shortlisted for the 2010 Australian Prime Minister’s Literary Awards. She is working on another novel and a memoir about New Zealand, Australia, and China.



  • Photo: Tereza Cerenova

    Born and raised in Hong Kong, Jennifer Wong studied English at Oxford University and has a creative writing PhD from Oxford Brookes University. She is the author of Goldfish (2013) and teaches part-time at City Lit and Oxford Brookes.



  • Karenne Wood, an enrolled member of the Monacan Indian Nation, holds an MFA in poetry and a PhD in linguistic anthropology. She is the author of two poetry collections, Markings on Earth (2000) and Weaving the Boundary (2016). Her poems have appeared in such journals as the Kenyon Review, Orion, and Shenandoah.



  • From his initial appearance in the Langston Hughes–edited anthology New Negro Poets U.S.A. (1964), Jay Wright (b. 1935, Albuquerque) has published fourteen volumes of poetry and been awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, the American Book Award, and Yale’s Bollingen Prize. Key works include Transfigurations: Collected Poems (2000) and The Guide Signs (2007), both from LSU Press. His collection Boleros was translated into Spanish and published by the University of Veracruz in 2005.



  • Photo by David Shankbone

    Carolyn D. "C. D." Wright (born January 6, 1949) is an American poet.


  • Christiane Wyrwa studied German and English literature at Göttingen, Durham GB, and Berlin, where she took a PhD in 1981. With her husband, Matthias Klein, she edited Kuno Raeber’s Collected Works in seven volumes from 2002 to 2010.



  • Xi Xi (the pen name of Cheung Yin) has written more than thirty books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. One of Hong Kong’s most beloved and prolific authors, she has won numerous international awards, most recently the 2019 Newman Prize for Chinese Literature.



  • Xiao An (b. 1964) is often regarded as a “poet’s poet” in China. One of the few women in the experimental poetry group feifei, meaning “neither/nor,” she has been working as a nurse in a psychiatric hospital for twenty years while steadily publishing poetry. Her writing is influenced by classical Chinese poetry but has a contemporary feel in its themes and sensibility.



  • PHOTO: Paul Hilton

    Xu Xi (@xuxiwriter) is the author of fourteen books, most recently This Fish Is Fowl: Essays of Being (2019). An Indonesian-Chinese-American diehard transnational, she splits her life, unevenly, between the state of New York and the rest of the world.



  • Min Yang is an assistant professor of Chinese Studies, Department of World Languages and Cultures, Bowling Green State University. Her research interests include trauma studies, contemporary Chinese literature, and visual culture.



  • Yi Sha, born in Chengdu in 1966, is considered one of China’s foremost avant-garde writers. He has published over twenty books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction; his influential online column, New Century Poetry Canon, recommends a poem a day to a wide readership throughout the Chinese-speaking world.



  • Hülya Yıldız is an assistant professor of comparative literature at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara. 


  • Man-Fung Yip is assistant professor of Film & Media Studies at the University of Oklahoma. He has recently completed a book manuscript entitled Martial Arts Cinema and Hong Kong Modernity: Aesthetics, Representation, Circulation



  • Yūichi Yokoyama was born in 1967 in Miyazaki, Japan, and currently lives and works in a Tokyo suburb. He received his MFA in oil painting from Musashino Art University in 1990 and has been active as a manga artist since 1995.



  • Yoo An-Jin is a Korean poet, essayist, and novelist. In 1970 she published the first of the seventeen collections of poetry she has published so far. She retired from her position as a professor at Seoul National University in 2006. In 2012 she became a member of Korea’s National Academy of Arts. She has received many prestigious literary awards.


  • Sunmin Yoon is an ethnomusicologist specializing in Mongolian folk songs. She is currently on the faculty at Kent State University.



  • Two of Yoss’s science-fiction novels have been translated into English: A Planet for Rent and Super Extra Grande. In 2017 his space opera, Condomnauts, was published in English. Born in Havana in 1969, Yoss is also the lead singer in the heavy-metal band Tenaz.



  • Lee Young-Kwang is a professor of creative writing and media studies at Korea University. He has published four collections of poetry; in 2011 All the Evening Wishes won the prestigious Mi-Dang literature award. Other awards include the Roe-Jak Prize (2008) and Ji-Hoon Prize for Literature (2011).


  • Yu Jian is a poet, author, and documentary film director.


  • Hamza Yusuf is president of Zaytuna College. He has been a student of the classical Islamic tradition for over forty years, studying with some of the most respected scholars of our time, and serves as an adviser to the Center for Islamic Studies at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. He is vice president of the Forum for Promoting Peace in Muslim Societies, an international initiative that seeks to address the root causes that can lead to radicalism and militancy. His most recent book is Purification of the Heart: Signs, Symptoms and Cures of the Spiritual Diseases of the Heart (2012).



  • Adam Zagajewski (b. 1945) was born in the city of Lwów (now Lvov, Ukrainian SSR), but was forced to leave as an infant when the Red Army occupied the city. After studying philosophy at Jagiellonian University in Kraków, he emigrated to Paris, where he would remain until 2002. He began writing poetry in the 1970s and helped lead the movement that would come to be known as the Polish New Wave. He built his career around teaching at various universities around the world, including the University of Houston and the University of Chicago in the United States.



  • Sepideh Zamani’s first collection of short stories, Barbuda, was published in Persian in 2016. Her novel Ouroboros was published in 2018. Sleeping in a Dark Cave and Women Looking at the Sky are forthcoming in 2019. Born in Iran in 1973, Zamani graduated from law school in 1999 and moved to the United States a year later.



  • Photo by Omar Faundez

    Alejandro Zambra (born 1975) is a poet, fiction writer, and literary critic born in Santiago, Chile. He studied at the Instituto Nacional and the University of Chile. He currently teaches at the School of Literature at the Diego Portales University in Santiago. He has contributed articles on literature in newspapers The Latest News, The Clinic, El Mercurio and La Tercera, and magazines such as Turia and Letras Libres.


  • Daisy Zamora’s poetry collections in Spanish have been published in Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Spain. Most recently, her selected poems were published in Madrid: La violenta espuma (Visor, 2017). Bilingual collections of her work have been published in England and the US, including The Violent Foam, translated by George Evans.


World Literature Today
630 Parrington Oval, Suite 110
Norman, OK 73019-4037
405-325-4531



Updated by World Literature Today: [email protected]