Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Karl Pollin-Dubois

    Karl Pollin-Dubois teaches French and comparative literature at the University of Tulsa. The author of Alfred Jarry: L’Expérimentation du singulier (2014), his research focuses mainly on the notions of affect and trance as they are depicted both in literature and cinema.



  • Francis Ponge

    Francis Ponge (1899-1988) is a French essayist and poet. He was born in Montpellier and studied at the world-renowned Sorbonne. His first poems were published as early as 1923, and it would be through these publications that he introduced his distinct poetic style. His style of prose poetry (he often refered to this style as proêms) features meticulous descriptions of natural, everyday objects in lyric prose form. He is the laureate of the 1974 Neustadt Prize.



  • Elena Poniatowska

    Elena Poniatowska is the 2014 recipient of the Miguel de Cervantes Prize. One of Mexico’s leading journalists and authors, and a nominee for the 2012 Neustadt Prize, Poniatowska’s work focuses on the disenfranchised.



  • Jacquelyn Pope

    Jacquelyn Pope’s first collection of poems, Watermark, was published by Marsh Hawk Press; Hungerpots, her translation of the Dutch poet Hester Knibbe, was published by Eyewear. She is the recipient of a 2015 NEA Translation Fellowship and a 2012 PEN/Heim Translation Fund grant. She recently translated four poems by Elisabeth Eybers and three by Hendrik Marsman for WLT.


  • Chad W. Post

    Chad W. Post is the director of Open Letter Books and managing editor of Three Percent, a blog and review site that promotes literature in translation and is home to both the Translation Database and the Best Translated Book Awards. His articles and book reviews have appeared in a range of publications including The Believer, Publishing Perspectives, the Wall Street Journal culture blog, and Quarterly Conversation.


  • Lili Potpara

    Lili Potpara is a Slovenian writer and translator. She studied English and French at the University of Ljubljana. She has translated numerous works into both Slovenian and English, and her short fiction has been published in a variety of Slovenian magazines. She has published two collections of short stories. Her first, Zgodbe na dušek (Bottoms up stories), won the Prize for Best Literary Debut from the Professional Association of Publishers and Booksellers of Slovenia in 2002.



  • Jason Poudrier

    Jason Poudrier is an Army veteran and Purple Heart recipient. He has authored two poetry collections, Red Fields (Mongrel Empire Press, 2012) and a chapbook, In the Rubble at Our Feet (Rose Rock Press, 2011). In 2013 Red Fields was awarded the Eric Hoffer Montaigne Medal, short-listed for the Hoffer Grand Prize, and awarded an honorable mention in the poetry category. Poudrier has been selected twice to participate in the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library’s Healing Through the Humanities event.



  • Susan Power

    Susan Power is an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux. She’s the author of The Grass Dancer (PEN/Hemingway prizewinner), Roofwalker, and Sacred Wilderness. Her most recent fellowships include a Loft McKnight Fellowship for 2015–16 and a Native Arts & Cultures Fellowship for 2016–17. 


  • Robert Powers

    Robert Powers has an MFA in fiction from Purdue University and will be starting a PhD at Florida State University in fall 2018. His fiction has been published in Glimmer Train, among other journals. He is currently working on a novel-in-stories set in contemporary China.


  • J. L. Powers

    J. L. Powers (jlpowers.net) is the award-winning author of three novels for young adults (The Confessional, This Thing Called the Future, and Amina) and is editor of an anthology of personal essays, That Mad Game: Growing Up in a Warzone. She is editor of The Pirate Tree: Social Justice and Children’s Literature (thepiratetree.com) and co-collaborator of Mother, Writer, Mentor (motherwritermentor.com). She teaches English and creative writing at Skyline College in San Bruno, California. 


  • Gerald Prince

    Gerald Prince is Professor of Romance Languages and chair of French and Francophone Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of many articles and reviews and of several books, including A Dictionary of Narratology and Guide du roman de langue française: 1901–1950.



  • Nicholas Pritchard

    Nicholas Pritchard is a writer living in London. His articles can be found at Caña, Jewish Renaissance, WLT, and elsewhere.


  • Tatyana Prokhorova

    Tatyana Prokhorova is a full-time professor in the Department of Russian Literature at Kazan Federal University. An author of two monographs and a large number of essays on different aspects of Russian literature and drama, she is also a lecturer in Russian studies. Both authors are involved in comparative studies and have published several works together.



  • Rain Prud’homme-Cranford

    Rain Prud’homme-Cranford (Goméz) is a “FAT-tastic IndigeNerd” who won the First Book Award Poetry from the Native Writers’ Circle of the Americas for Smoked Mullet Cornbread Crawdad Memory (MEP 2012). She is an assistant professor of Indigenous literature in the Department of English and affiliated faculty in the International Indigenous Studies Program at the University of Calgary. 



  • Photo by Kevin Platt

    Artur Punte

    Artur Punte is a member of Orbita, a creative collective of Russian poets and artists. He is a media artist and also works as an advertising writer in Riga, Latvia. A graduate of the Gorky Literary Institute in Moscow, he is the author of two books of poetry in Russian and has published in the journals Daugava, Vavilon, Orbita, and others.



  • Omar Qaqish

    Omar Qaqish is a teaching fellow in English at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York, and a doctoral candidate at McGill University. He teaches and researches literature by Arab authors writing in English, Arabic, and French (and sometimes Italian).


  • M. Lynx Qualey

    M. Lynx Qualey writes about Arabic literature and translation issues for a variety of publications, including her daily blog, arablit.wordpress.com


  • Alon Raab

    Alon Raab is a writer, co-editor of The Global Game: Writers on Soccer, and a lifelong lover of bicycles.



  • Photo by Jonat De La Rosa

    José Rabelo

    José Rabelo (b. 1963) is a Puerto Rican writer and dermatologist. Some of his books include La casa de los animales extraños (2020), Los mundos de Lonstal (2020), Club de calamidades (El Barco de Vapor Award, 2013), PAM (2013), and 2063 y otras distopías (2018).



  • István D. Rácz

    István D. Rácz is a professor of English in the Institute of English and American Studies at the University of Debrecen, Hungary. He has published books and studies on post-1945 British poetry, translation studies, and Romantic poetry.



  • Photo: Ana Kašćelan

    Milovan Radojević

    Milovan Radojević has been an editor and screenwriter for art and culture programs on Montenegrin television since 1988, and he is associated with the Montenegrin National Theater. His publications include the novel Dominik (2001) and a short-story collection, Rains . . . White Dogs (Kiše . . . bijeli psi, 2013). Radojević is a member of the Montenegrin PEN Center. 



  • Stella Vinitchi Radulescu

    Stella Vinitchi Radulescu was born in Romania and left the country at the height of the Communist regime. Writing poetry in three languages, she has published numerous books in the United States, France, Belgium, and Romania. Radulescu’s French books have received several awards, including the Grand Prix de Poésie Noël-Henri Villard and the Prix Amélie Murat.


  • Tom Rains

    Tom Rains is a WLT intern.



  • Ellie Rambo

    Ellie Rambo is a PhD student in English at UNC–Chapel Hill, where she studies twentieth-century American and Russian-language literature. She is the assistant managing editor for Post Road magazine.



  • Juan Hernández Ramírez

    Juan Hernández Ramírez is a renowned Nahua poet from the community of Colatlán in the municipality of Ixhuatlán de Madero, Veracruz, Mexico. His life in the Huasteca has had an indelible impression on his poetry. He identifies this founding experience as key in his literature and deep respect for the earth. Hernández Ramírez was awarded the Premio Nezahualcoyotl for his book of poetry Chikome Xochitl in 2006. In 2008 he received the continental prize Canto de América for Tlatlatok tetl (Stone on fire). He has published five books of poetry and has numerous forthcoming publications.



  • Photo by Daianara Rodríguez

    Juanluís Ramos

    Juanluís Ramos (b. 1985, Bayamón) is the author of two story collections, Shadowplay (2016) and Reyerta TV (2009). For the latter, he obtained the 2009 National Short Story Prize awarded by the PEN Club Puerto Rico. In 2017 he received the Festival de la Palabra’s Nuevas Voces prize, an award given to up-and-coming Puerto Rican authors.



  • Photo by Juan Pérez

    Margaret Randall

    Margaret Randall (b. 1936, New York) is a poet, essayist, oral historian, translator, photographer, and social activist. Time’s Language: Selected Poems 1959–2018 recently appeared from Wings Press. Randall lived in Latin America for twenty-three years (Mexico, Cuba, Nicaragua). She received the 2017 Medalla al Mérito Literario from Literatura en el Bravo (Ciudad Juárez, Mexico). In 2019 she was given the “Poet of Two Hemispheres” award by Poesía en Paralelo Cero (Quito, Ecuador) and the Haydée Santamaría medal by Casa de las Américas (Cuba). A memoir, I Never Left Home: Poet, Feminist, Revolutionary, is due out from Duke University Press in spring 2020. In May 2019 Randall was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.


  • Shaun Randol

    Shaun Randol is the founder and editor of The Mantle. He is also an Associate Fellow at the World Policy Institute in New York City, and a member of the National Book Critics Circle and the PEN American Center.



  • Raja Rao

    Raja Rao (1908-2006) was born in Hassan, in what is now Narnataka in South India. Though his father taught Kannada at the college where he worked, Rao studied in France for his post-graduate studies and most of his publications were written in the English language. His first stories began appearing in various magazines and journals in 1933, and he published his first book in 1938. Upon his return to India in 1939, Rao became involved in the nationalist movement emerging there. From 1966-1983, he relocated back to the United States and taught Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin.



  • Photo © Anne Staveley

    Emily Rapp Black

    Emily Rapp Black is the author of Poster Child: A Memoir and The Still Point of the Turning World, which was a New York Times best-seller. She is an associate professor of creative writing at UC–Riverside.


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