Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Ibrahim Abdel Meguid is an award-winning Egyptian novelist and author. He was born in Alexandria in 1946 and studied philosophy at Alexandria University. He obtained his BA in 1973 and moved to Cairo the following year. He published his first novel around the same time. Among his best known works are Birds of Amber, No One Sleeps in Alexandria and The Other Place. These have been translated into English and French. Abdel Meguid won the inaugural Naguib Mahfouz Medal for The Other Place.



  • Photo by Stuart C. Shapiro

    Nigerian novelist and poet Chinua Achebe is best known for his first novel and magnum opus Things Fall Apart (1958). Achebe was nominated for the Neustadt International Prize for Literature in 1994 and 2004, and he was a Neustadt Prize jury member in 1974.



  • Robert Adams is an American photographer.



  • Shaheen Akhtar is the author of five collections of short stories and three novels—Palabar Path Nei (No Escape Route); Talaash (The Search); and Shokhi Rongomala. Talaash won the Best Book of the Year Award for 2004 from Prothom Alo, the largest-circulation daily newspaper in Bangladesh. The English translation of the novel was published in 2011 by Zubaan Books, Delhi, India. Akhtar has also edited the three-volume Soti O Swotontora: Bangla Shahitye Nari about the portrayal of women in Bengali literature. She currently works for Ain O Salish Kendra (ASK), a human rights / legal aid organization in Dhaka, Bangladesh.



  • Claribel Alegría (b. 1924) is often considered the most important contributor to contemporary Central American literature. She was born in Estelí, Nicaragua, but spent most of her youth in the Santa Ana region of western El Salvador because of her father’s political exile. In 1943 she came to the United States to study at George Washington University, where she received her bachelors degree in philosophy and letters. She would not return to her country of origin until 1979, after the Sandinista National Liberation Front took control of the government. She is the 2006 laureate of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature.



  • Photo by Tamara Hadi

    Meena Alexander (born 1951) is an internationally acclaimed poet, scholar, and writer. Born in Allahabad, India, and raised in India and Sudan, Alexander lives and works in New York City, where she is Distinguished Professor of English at Hunter College in the MFA program in Creative Writing and at the CUNY Graduate Center in the PhD program in English. She is the author of numerous collections of poetry, literary memoirs, essays, and works of fiction and literary criticism.



  • Cristina Alger graduated from Harvard College in 2002 and from New York University School of Law in 2007. She has worked as an analyst at Goldman Sachs and as an attorney at Wilmer, Cutler, Pickering, Hale, and Dorr. She lives in New York City, where she was born and raised. The Darlings is her first novel. She is currently working on her next book.



  • Kazim Ali has worked as a political organizer, lobbyist, and yoga instructor. His books include two volumes of poetry, The Far Mosque and The Fortieth Day; the novels Quinn’s Passage and The Disappearance of Seth; and a book of lyric prose, Bright Felon: Autobiography and Cities. He has taught writing and literature at various colleges including the Culinary Institute of America, Monroe Community College, Shippensburg University, and New York University, and currently teaches at Oberlin College and in the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA Program. Co-founder of the small press Nightboat Books, his poetry and essays appear widely in such journals as Atlas, American Poetry Review, Boston Review, jubilat, and in Best American Poetry 2007.


  • John Tyler Allen is a freelance writer in New York City. He is currently attending the NYU Publishing Institute.



  • Selçuk Altun (b.1950) is a Turkish writer who writes novels. Three of his novels have been published in an English translation.



  • Anamika is an established Hindi poet and essayist. She has won several national awards for her collections of poems, essays, and fiction and teaches English literature at Satyawati College (University of Delhi). Her trilogy woven around the characters of Pandita Ramabai, Dhela Bai, and Tara insightfully traces the meaning of mukti in its different registers. From salvation to liberation, from the divine call phenomenon to the call center and call girl phenomenon, Mukti travels a long way. Against the backdrop of the three phases of the Freedom movement, stree-mukti also has traveled far and wide. In its representation of different ontological and material issues, this novel in three parts has earned her wide acclaim.



  • Rudolfo Anaya (b. 1937) is an American author who has written novels, non-fiction, poetry, and children’s books. Some awards he has received include the New Mexico Book Awards’ People’s Choice Award in 2007 and the Robert Kirsch Award in 2011.



  • Photo by Kanaka Menehune

    Homero Aridjis (born April 6, 1940) is a Mexican poet, novelist, environmental activist, journalist and diplomat known for his originality and independence.



  • Photo by Harold Abramowitz

    Rae Armantrout (b. 1947) is an American poet born in California. She has published ten books of poetry and also has been featured in anthologies. She is a professor of poetry and poetics at the University of California, San Diego.



  • Photo by Ted Waddell

    Rilla Askew is a fifth-generation Oklahoman. Her books include The Mercy Seat, Fire in Beulah, and Harpsong. The recipient of a 2009 Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts & Letters, she divides her time between Oklahoma, where she teaches at the University of Oklahoma, and her home in upstate New York.



  • Paul Auster (b. 1947) is an American author and director. He is a novelist and poet, and writes absurdist fiction, crime fiction, and mystery fiction. He won the IMPAC Award in 2010, 2011, and 2012.



  • Esmahan Aykol (b. 1970) is a Turkish writer. She has written three novels, which have been published in Turkish, German, French, and Italian.


  • Pier Luigi Bacchini (b. 1927) is from Parma (Emilia), where he lived until 1993, retiring to the countryside near Medesano not far from the city. His poetry collections include Dal silenzio d'un nulla (1954), Canti familiari (1968), Distanze, fioriture (1981), Visi e foglie (1993), Scritture vegetali (1999), Contemplazioni meccaniche e pneumatiche (2005), and Canti territoriali (2009). "Chiacchiere," the poem translated here, is from Scritture vegetali.



  • Photo by Stéphane Chaumet

    Rachel Tzvia Back—poet, translator, and professor of literature—lives in the Galilee, where her great-great-great-grandfather settled in the 1830s. Her newest book of translations, In the Illuminated Dark: Selected Poems of Tuvia Ruebner, just appeared in a bilingual edition from Hebrew Union College Press and University of Pittsburgh Press. Her most recent original poetry collection is A Messenger Comes (Elegies), voted by Forward magazine one of the five most notable poetry collections of 2012.



  • Shakeel Badayuni (1916–70) was a successful and prolific Bollywood songwriter as well as a renowned author of Urdu ghazals. Born in Uttar Pradesh, India, his father taught him Arabic, Urdu, Farsi, and Hindi. He attended Aligarh University in the 1930s, then a center of political and poetical ferment. He quickly became a leading figure in Bollywood with the success of the first film he wrote lyrics for, Dard. Shakeel wrote lyrics for eighty-nine films.





  • Photo by Dudas Szalbocs

    Zsófia Bán was born in 1957 in Rio de Janeiro. She is a writer, critic, and scholar. “A két Frida” (“The Two Fridas”) was published in Bán’s short-story collection Esti iskola: Olvasókönyv felnotteknek (2007; Evening school: A reader for adults), her first work of fiction, for which she was awarded the Attila József Prize. She has been a prolific writer of essays and reviews on literature, art, and visual culture. Her essay collections include Próbacsomagolás (2008; Test-packing) and Amerikaner (2000). She teaches at the Department of American Studies at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest. She was a participant at the 2009 PEN World Voices Festival, representing Hungary.


  • Neelanjana Banerjee is a writer and editor whose poetry and fiction have appeared in the Literary Review, Asian Pacific American Journal, Nimrod, A Room of One’s Own, Desilit, and the anthology Desilicious. She received an MFA in Creative Writing from San Francisco State University in 2007 and was a Hedgebrook Fellow in 2008. She has worked in mainstream, ethnic, and independent media for the past ten years and has helped young people tell their stories at YO! Youth Outlook Multimedia and the San Francisco WritersCorps. She is a co-editor of Indivisible (University of Arkansas Press, 2010), the first anthology of South Asian American poetry.


  • Kaitlin Bankston is an English literary and cultural studies major at the University of Oklahoma who studied Handal’s work and met her in September 2011 during the Neustadt Festival of International Literature and Culture.


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