Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Christopher Domínguez Michael (b. 1962) is a Mexican writer, historian, and literary critic. In 2006, he received the Guggenheim Fellowship. Since 2010 he has spent time as a research associate at the College of Mexico.



  • Photo by Tineke de Lange

    Han Dong (b. 1961) is a Chinese writer and blogger. He has work in both Chinese and English.



  • Hélène Dorion (b. 1958) is a Canadian poet, essayist, and novelist. Some of her recent awards include being named Chevalier de l’Ordre national du Québec and being a finalist for the Prix du livre jeunesse des bibliothèques de Montréal for The Cradled Life.



  • Sébastien Doubinsky (b. 1963) is a French writer, translator, poet, and editor. He writes in both French and English and has published novels in both languages, as well as three novels in Danish.



  • Jennifer Doyle is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside, where she teaches gender studies, visual culture, and American literature. She is the author of Sex Objects: Art and the Dialectics of Desire (2006) and Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art (forthcoming from Duke University Press). She writes a feminist soccer blog, From a Left Wing (fromaleftwing.blogspot.com), and is working on a book about art and sport, tentatively titled The Athletic Gesture.



  • Brian Doyle (b. 1935) is a Canadian writer whose children’s books have been adapted into movies and plays. In 1998 and 2008, he was a finalist for the Hans Christian Andersen Award.



  • Photo by Chris Boland

    Margaret Drabble (b. 1939) is an English novelist, biographer, and critic. She has published 17 novels, and in 2011, she was awarded the Golden PEN Award.



  • Nataša Dragnić (b. 1965) is a Croatian writer and poet. She currently lives in Germany where she works as a foreign language instructor.


  • Žydrūnas Drungilas did his graduate studies at Klaipeda University in Lithuania and the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is currently editor of the weekly cultural journal Šiaurės Atėnai in Vilnius, Lithuania. Between rare but memorable visits to literary salons, he has been seen wandering the streets of Vilnius in a state best described as inscrutable.



  • Zoran Drvenkar (b. 1967) is a Croatian German novelist. His novel Sorry won the Friedrich-Glauser Prize in 2010.



  • Duo Duo 多多 (b. 1951) is the pen name of Li Shizheng, who was born in Beijing in 1951. He started writing poetry in the early 1970s as a youth during the isolated, midnight hours of the Cultural Revolution, and many of his early poems critiqued the Cultural Revolution from an insider's point of view in a highly sophisticated, original style. Often considered part of the "Misty" school of contemporary Chinese poetry, he nevertheless kept a cautious distance from any literary trends or labeling.

    After witnessing the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, Duo Duo left China and did not return for more than a decade. Upon his return to China in 2004, the literary community received him with honor and praise. Duo Duo currently teaches at Hainan University and divides his time between Hainan and Beijing. His translations into English include the verse collections Looking Out from Death: From the Cultural Revolution to Tiananmen Square (1989) and The Boy Who Catches Wasps (2002) as well as Snow Plain (2010), a recent collection of short stories. Duo Duo is the twenty-first laureate of the Neustadt Prize and the first Chinese recipient of the award.

    Read Duo Duo's 2010 Neustadt Prize acceptance speech and three of his poems in bilingual texts.



  • Geoff Dyer (b. 1958) is an English writer and a journalist. Some awards he has receive include the E.M. Forster Award in 2006 and the GQ Writer of the Year Award in 2009.


  • George Evans is the author of five books of poetry published in the United States and England, including The New World (2002) and Sudden Dreams (1995). His poetry, fiction, essays, and translations have been published in literary magazines throughout the U.S. and in Australia, England, France, Ireland, Japan, Nicaragua, and Viet Nam. His honors include writing fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lannan Foundation, the California Arts Council, and a Japanese government Monbusho Fellowship for the study of Japanese literature. He has also co-translated The Violent Foam: New and Selected Poems (2002), by his wife, Nicaraguan poet Daisy Zamora; The Time Tree (2003), poems by Vietnamese poet Huu Thinh; and edited the two-volume correspondence of Charles Olson and Cid Corman. An antiwar activist veteran of the Viet Nam War, he is one of the subjects of the recent radio series Shared Weight, a six-episode program addressing the impact of war on culture and society, produced for National Public Radio (NPR) by the Center for Emerging Media at WYPR in Baltimore.



  • Brian Fanelli’s poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in a number of magazines and journals, most recently Oklahoma Review, Spillway, Boston Literary Magazine, Portland Review, and Third Wednesday. Fanelli is the author of one chapbook, Front Man (Big Table Publishing), and the full-length collection All That Remains, forthcoming soon from Unbound Content. Prior to working as a full-time English instructor at Lackawanna College, Fanelli worked a number of jobs, including country clerk, factory worker, and adjunct instructor. He has an MFA from Wilkes University and is currently a PhD student at SUNY Binghamton.



  • Nuruddin Farah (b. 1945) was born in the Italian-ruled southern region of Somalia, Baidoa. His mother was a traditional storyteller, and his father was a merchant who later worked for the British government as an interpreter. Farah lived in a multilingual environment and learned to speak Somali, Amharic, English, Italian, and Arabic. When he began to write, Farah chose English as the language of his works. His first novel, From A Crooked Rib (1970), depicts the authoritarian role of patriarchy in African society and earned Farah praise as a "male feminist." The publication of his second novel, A Naked Needle (1976), angered the Somalian dictatorial regime and finally forced Farah into exile after receiving death threats. Farah would not return to live in Somalia again, but his lifelong pursuit is to keep his country through his writing.


  • Nancy Finn teaches dramatic literature and Irish studies in the English Department at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and theater studies in the Performing Arts Department at Emerson College. She received her PhD in theater from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her research interests include modern and contemporary Irish theater and drama, contemporary women playwrights, and theater historiography. She is also an actor and dramaturge. She is currently writing a monograph on the work of Marina Carr. 


  • A native of Naples, Peppe Fiore lives and works in Rome. In addition to Nessuno è indispensabile, he is the author of two short-story collections and a second novel, La futura classe dirigente (The future ruling class). His interest in writing about the world of work, he says, is tied to the way “working life becomes a useful framework for understanding how we function as a species.”


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