Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Jim Daniels’s new book, Birth Marks, was published by BOA Editions in 2013. Other recent books include Trigger Man: More Tales of the Motor City (fiction), Having a Little Talk with Capital P Poetry, and All of the Above, all published in 2011. His poem “Factory Love” is displayed on the roof of a race car. A native of Detroit, Daniels teaches at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.



  • Mahmoud Darwish (b. 1942) is an Arab poet and political activist. He has published around 30 poetry and prose collections that have been translated into 35 languages. Several of his poems have been put to music. In 1997, a documentary was producted about him by French-Israeli director Simone Bitton. Darwish is the winner of the 2001 Lannan Prize for Cultural Freedom.



  • Dr. J. P. (Jagannath Prasad) Das (b. 1936) is a well-known Oriya poet, playwright, and fiction writer. Most of his works have been translated into English and other Indian languages, and his plays have been staged in many languages all over India. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Saraswati Samman. A noted art historian, he has published several books on Orissan art.



  • J. Madison Davis is the author of eight mystery novels, including The Murder of Frau Schütz, an Edgar nominee, and Law and Order: Dead Line, which was an e-book best-seller. He has also published seven nonfiction books and dozens of short stories and articles, including his column on international crime writing in WLT since 2004; his “The 10 Greatest Crime Novels of All Time?” essay appeared in the January 20016 issue. His five-year term as world president of the International Association of Crime Writers concluded in 2013, and he currently serves as North American president.



  • Diego De Silva (b. 1964) has written plays, screenplays, and six novels. His novel I Hadn’t Understood won the Naples Prize for fiction and was a finalist for the Strega Prize in Italy. His books have been translated into eight languages.



  • Sietse de Vries is a Dutch author. His novel Bak was published in 2012.



  • Aleš Debeljak is a Slovenian poet and cultural critic. His poetry books in English include The City and the Child, Dictionary of Silence, and Anxious Moments, and his nonfiction works include The Hidden Handshake: National Identity and Europe in the Post-Communist World, Reluctant Modernity: The Institution of Art and Its Historical Forms, and Twilight of the Idols: Recollections of a Lost Yugoslavia. A former Roberta Buffet Professor of International Studies at Northwestern University, he teaches at the University of Ljubljana and the Collège d’Europe, Natolin-Warsaw.



  • Ludovic Debeurme (b. 1971) is a French graphic novelist and illustrator. He first published his work in Comix 2000, an anthology. His graphic novel Lucille won the René Goscinny Prize in 2006.



  • Guy Delisle (b. 1966) is a Canadian graphic novelist and animator. His graphic novel Chroniques de Jérusalem won the Angoulême International Comics Festival Prize for Best Album in 2012. In France, the graphic novel was a best-seller.



  • Friedrich Christian Delius (b. 1943) is a German writer who has published more than a dozen novels as well as poetry collections. His work has been translated into 17 languages. Some of the literary prizes he has received include the Joseph Breitbach Prize, the Georg Büchner Prize, and the Critics Prize.



  • Junot Díaz (b. 1968) is a Dominican-American writer, creative writing professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and fiction editor at Boston Review. His novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2008.



  • Wilhelm Dichter (b. 1935) is a Polish-American writer, his 1996 literary debut God’s Horse was nominated for the Nike, the top literary award in Poland. His second book The Atheists’ School also was nominated for the Nike. He and his wife currently reside in the Boston area.



  • Bernard Diederich (b. 1926) is a New Zealand-born writer and historian. His awards include the Maria Moors Cabot Gold Medal in 1976, the Overseas Press Club’s Mary Hemingway citation for the best reporting abroad in 1983, the James Nelson Goodsell Award in 2003, as well as the Caonabo de Oro Award in 2003.



  • Lisa DiGiovanni is Assistant Professor of Spanish at Indiana State University. Her areas of specialization include nineteenth- through twentieth-century Spanish Peninsular and Latin American literature and film from a transnational perspective, with an emphasis on the relationship among history, literature, memory, nostalgia, and gender.



  • Lidija Dimkovska is a Macedonian poet, novelist, and translator. She has published eight books and her work has been translated into over 20 languages. She currently resides in Ljubljana, Slovenia.



  • Kiki Dimoula is a member of the Academy of Athens. She has been awarded the Greek State Prize twice, the Grand State Prize, the Ouranis Prize, and the Aristeion of Letters (given by the Academy of Athens), as well as the European Prize for Literature. Her poetry has been translated into English, French, Danish, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, and many other languages.



  • Fred Dings is the author of two books of poetry, Eulogy for a Private Man and After the Solstice. His poems have been published in the New Republic, the New Yorker, Poetry, Paris Review, TriQuarterly, and others. He is an associate professor at the University of South Carolina in Columbia and a regular poetry reviewer for World Literature Today.



  • Tessa Ditner is half French and half English, which is the main problem. She is a Cambridge University philosophy graduate from Corpus Christi College, where she got told off constantly for putting on plays instead of writing essays on free will. She specialized in literary journalism at Roehampton University during her MA, because it seemed so wonderfully nosey. You can follow her misadventures in London’s art and theater scene on Twitter @CultureKiddo.



  • Assia Djebar (b. 1936) is the pen name of Fatima-Zohra Imalayen. She was born in a small coastal town in Algeria, where her father taught French. In 1955, she was the first woman to be accepted into the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, where she published her first novel in 1957. Her pen name originated from this novel, which she feared would anger her father. Her first collection of verse was published in 1969, the same year that she would also publish her first work of drama. In 1978 she became a film director, and her work on La nouba des femmes du Mont Chenoua ("The Mount Chenoua Band of Women") granted her the prestigious Grand Prize at the Venice Film Festival in 1979. In 2005, based on her superior body of work, Djebar was accepted to the Académie française and represents the first elector from the Mahgreb.



  • Dubravka Djurić (b. 1961) is a Croatian author of poetry and essays. She performs her writings as well.



  • Tamas Dobozy is a Canadian writer and teacher at Laurier University in Ontario. In 2012, he won the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize for Siege 13, his book of short stories.



  • Christopher Domínguez Michael (b. 1962) is a Mexican writer, historian, and literary critic. In 2006, he received the Guggenheim Fellowship. Since 2010 he has spent time as a research associate at the College of Mexico.



  • Photo by Tineke de Lange

    Han Dong (b. 1961) is a Chinese writer and blogger. He has work in both Chinese and English.



  • Hélène Dorion (b. 1958) is a Canadian poet, essayist, and novelist. Some of her recent awards include being named Chevalier de l’Ordre national du Québec and being a finalist for the Prix du livre jeunesse des bibliothèques de Montréal for The Cradled Life.



  • Sébastien Doubinsky (b. 1963) is a French writer, translator, poet, and editor. He writes in both French and English and has published novels in both languages, as well as three novels in Danish.



  • Jennifer Doyle is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside, where she teaches gender studies, visual culture, and American literature. She is the author of Sex Objects: Art and the Dialectics of Desire (2006) and Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art (forthcoming from Duke University Press). She writes a feminist soccer blog, From a Left Wing (fromaleftwing.blogspot.com), and is working on a book about art and sport, tentatively titled The Athletic Gesture.



  • Brian Doyle (b. 1935) is a Canadian writer whose children’s books have been adapted into movies and plays. In 1998 and 2008, he was a finalist for the Hans Christian Andersen Award.


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