Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z

  • Kiki Dimoula is a member of the Academy of Athens. She has been awarded the Greek State Prize twice, the Grand State Prize, the Ouranis Prize, and the Aristeion of Letters (given by the Academy of Athens), as well as the European Prize for Literature. Her poetry has been translated into English, French, Danish, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, and many other languages.



  • Fred Dings is the author of two books of poetry, Eulogy for a Private Man and After the Solstice. His poems have been published in the New Republic, the New Yorker, Poetry, Paris Review, TriQuarterly, and others. He is an associate professor at the University of South Carolina in Columbia and a regular poetry reviewer for World Literature Today.



  • Tessa Ditner is half French and half English, which is the main problem. She is a Cambridge University philosophy graduate from Corpus Christi College, where she got told off constantly for putting on plays instead of writing essays on free will. She specialized in literary journalism at Roehampton University during her MA, because it seemed so wonderfully nosey. You can follow her misadventures in London’s art and theater scene on Twitter @CultureKiddo.



  • Assia Djebar (b. 1936) is the pen name of Fatima-Zohra Imalayen. She was born in a small coastal town in Algeria, where her father taught French. In 1955, she was the first woman to be accepted into the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, where she published her first novel in 1957. Her pen name originated from this novel, which she feared would anger her father. Her first collection of verse was published in 1969, the same year that she would also publish her first work of drama. In 1978 she became a film director, and her work on La nouba des femmes du Mont Chenoua ("The Mount Chenoua Band of Women") granted her the prestigious Grand Prize at the Venice Film Festival in 1979. In 2005, based on her superior body of work, Djebar was accepted to the Académie française and represents the first elector from the Mahgreb.



  • Dubravka Djurić (b. 1961) is a Croatian author of poetry and essays. She performs her writings as well.



  • Tamas Dobozy is a Canadian writer and teacher at Laurier University in Ontario. In 2012, he won the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize for Siege 13, his book of short stories.



  • Christopher Domínguez Michael (b. 1962) is a Mexican writer, historian, and literary critic. In 2006, he received the Guggenheim Fellowship. Since 2010 he has spent time as a research associate at the College of Mexico.



  • Photo by Tineke de Lange

    Han Dong (b. 1961) is a Chinese writer and blogger. He has work in both Chinese and English.



  • Hélène Dorion (b. 1958) is a Canadian poet, essayist, and novelist. Some of her recent awards include being named Chevalier de l’Ordre national du Québec and being a finalist for the Prix du livre jeunesse des bibliothèques de Montréal for The Cradled Life.



  • Sébastien Doubinsky (b. 1963) is a French writer, translator, poet, and editor. He writes in both French and English and has published novels in both languages, as well as three novels in Danish.



  • Brian Doyle (b. 1935) is a Canadian writer whose children’s books have been adapted into movies and plays. In 1998 and 2008, he was a finalist for the Hans Christian Andersen Award.



  • Jennifer Doyle is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside, where she teaches gender studies, visual culture, and American literature. She is the author of Sex Objects: Art and the Dialectics of Desire (2006) and Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art (forthcoming from Duke University Press). She writes a feminist soccer blog, From a Left Wing (fromaleftwing.blogspot.com), and is working on a book about art and sport, tentatively titled The Athletic Gesture.



  • Photo by Chris Boland

    Margaret Drabble (b. 1939) is an English novelist, biographer, and critic. She has published 17 novels, and in 2011, she was awarded the Golden PEN Award.



  • Nataša Dragnić (b. 1965) is a Croatian writer and poet. She currently lives in Germany where she works as a foreign language instructor.


  • Žydrūnas Drungilas did his graduate studies at Klaipeda University in Lithuania and the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is currently editor of the weekly cultural journal Šiaurės Atėnai in Vilnius, Lithuania. Between rare but memorable visits to literary salons, he has been seen wandering the streets of Vilnius in a state best described as inscrutable.



  • Zoran Drvenkar (b. 1967) is a Croatian German novelist. His novel Sorry won the Friedrich-Glauser Prize in 2010.



  • Duo Duo 多多 (b. 1951) is the pen name of Li Shizheng, who was born in Beijing in 1951. He started writing poetry in the early 1970s as a youth during the isolated, midnight hours of the Cultural Revolution, and many of his early poems critiqued the Cultural Revolution from an insider's point of view in a highly sophisticated, original style. Often considered part of the "Misty" school of contemporary Chinese poetry, he nevertheless kept a cautious distance from any literary trends or labeling.

    After witnessing the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, Duo Duo left China and did not return for more than a decade. Upon his return to China in 2004, the literary community received him with honor and praise. Duo Duo currently teaches at Hainan University and divides his time between Hainan and Beijing. His translations into English include the verse collections Looking Out from Death: From the Cultural Revolution to Tiananmen Square (1989) and The Boy Who Catches Wasps (2002) as well as Snow Plain (2010), a recent collection of short stories. Duo Duo is the twenty-first laureate of the Neustadt Prize and the first Chinese recipient of the award.

    Read Duo Duo's 2010 Neustadt Prize acceptance speech and three of his poems in bilingual texts.



  • Geoff Dyer (b. 1958) is an English writer and a journalist. Some awards he has receive include the E.M. Forster Award in 2006 and the GQ Writer of the Year Award in 2009.



  • Eric Ellingsen uses bio-spaces to squat bio-poems.
    This morning I couldn’t get my bio lines to read rite, so I took a bit out
    of the hand drill and inserted all my two-year-old’s red crayons
    drawing the red line. Then I went upstairs and read, instead
    of “state,” let us all be heads of lettuce, drawing on Khlebnikov.
    Whatever you throw into the eternal circumstance, have a good time.



  • Photo: AP

    Born in Iran, Mohsen Emadi is the award-winning author of four verse collections and numerous poetry translations; the poems featured in the print edition of the January issue come from a collection called “Standing on Earth.” Emadi is the founder and manager of Ahmad Shamlou’s official website and The House of World Poets, a Persian anthology featuring more than five hundred international writers. He currently lives in Mexico City.


  • George Evans is the author of five books of poetry published in the United States and England, including The New World (2002) and Sudden Dreams (1995). His poetry, fiction, essays, and translations have been published in literary magazines throughout the U.S. and in Australia, England, France, Ireland, Japan, Nicaragua, and Viet Nam. His honors include writing fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lannan Foundation, the California Arts Council, and a Japanese government Monbusho Fellowship for the study of Japanese literature. He has also co-translated The Violent Foam: New and Selected Poems (2002), by his wife, Nicaraguan poet Daisy Zamora; The Time Tree (2003), poems by Vietnamese poet Huu Thinh; and edited the two-volume correspondence of Charles Olson and Cid Corman. An antiwar activist veteran of the Viet Nam War, he is one of the subjects of the recent radio series Shared Weight, a six-episode program addressing the impact of war on culture and society, produced for National Public Radio (NPR) by the Center for Emerging Media at WYPR in Baltimore.


Pages