Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Branko Gorjup is editor of the Peter Paul Series of Contemporary English Canadian Poets for Longo Editore, Ravenna, a series that includes bilingual selections by Irving Layton, Gwendolyn MacEwen, P. K. Page, Al Purdy, Margaret Atwood, Michael Ondaatje, and Margaret Avison. In addition to several anthologies of short fiction by Canadian authors, Gorjup has prepared a selection of critical essays on Leon Rooke, which will be published this spring by Exile Editions of Toronto. Presently, he teaches Canadian literature at the University “S. Pio V” in Rome.



  • 2008 Neustadt Prize Laureate Patricia Grace was born in Wellington, New Zealand, and now lives on the ancestral land of her father's people in Plimmerton, a small coastal community. Grace has been writing and publishing since the mid-1970s. Her previous awards include the New Zealand Fiction Award in 1987 and the Frankfurt Liberaturepreis in 1994 for her novel Potiki, which has been translated into several languages. She received the Hubert Church Prose Award for Best First Book for Waiariki in 1976. Dogside Story won the Kiriyama Pacific Rim Fiction Prize in 2001 and was also long-listed for the Booker Prize. Her novel Tu was awarded the Deutz Medal for fiction at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2005.


  • Suzette R. Grillot is Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, where she also serves as the William J. Crowe Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and Vice Provost of International Programs.


  • Lee Gutkind is founder and editor of Creative Nonfiction (www.creativenonfiction.org), the first and largest literary magazine in the world to publish nonfiction narrative exclusively. Gutkind is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at Arizona State University. His most recent book is You Can’t Make This Stuff Up: The Complete Guide to Writing Creative Nonfiction—From Memoir to Literary Journalism and Everything in Between.



  • Paavo Haavikko (1931-2008) was a Finnish poet and playwright. He published his first collection of poetry in 1951, at the age of twenty. After three more poetry collections, two three-act plays, and two novels, Haavikko's first English-translated piece was published in 1961. He is the laureate of the 1984 Neustadt Prize.


  • Han Shaogong (b. 1953) is one of contemporary China's most critically acclaimed novelists, celebrated for his linguistically sophisticated and inventive novels and essays of modern China. More biographical information is included in Julia Lovell's essay (page 25 of the print or digital edition of WLT).



  • Nathalie Handal was raised in Latin America, France, and the Arab world. Described by Yusef Kumunyakaa “as one of the most important voices of her generation,” her most recent books include the critically acclaimed Poet in Andalucía and Love and Strange Horses, winner of the Gold Medal Independent Publisher Book Award.


  • Kaitlin Hawkins is the social media editor at WLT


  • Tobias Hecht is the author of the ethnographic novel After Life. His book At Home in the Street: Street Children of Northeast Brazil won the Margaret Mead Prize.



  • Allison Adelle Hedge Coke’s books include The Year of the Rat; Dog Road Woman; Off-Season City Pipe; Blood Run, and Rock, Ghost Willow, Deer. Forthcoming books include Burn & Streaming (2014). Hedge Coke is currently at work on a novella, a novel, a second memoir, new poetry and music, and a film. Her edited works include Sing: Poetry from the Indigenous Americas and Effigies. Effigies II is scheduled for release this year.



  • Kathleen Hellen’s poems have been published in over 175 journals and anthologies, including American Letters and Commentary, Barrow Street, Cimarron Review, Evergreen, Nimrod, Poetry Northwest, Prairie Schooner, Rattapallax, Sycamore Review, and Witness. Her collection Umberto’s Night, winner of the Jean Feldman Poetry Prize from Washington Writers’ Publishing House, was published in 2012. In 2010 Finishing Line Press published her chapbook The Girl Who Loved Mothra.


  • David Henderson teaches music and film at St. Lawrence University. His research is primarily on music and film in Kathmandu, Nepal. 



  • George Henson is a senior lecturer of Spanish at the University of Texas at Dallas, where he is completing a PhD in literary and translation studies. His translations, including works by Andrés Neuman, Miguel Barnet, and Leonardo Padura, have appeared previously in World Literature Today. His translations of Elena Poniatowska’s The Heart of the Artichoke and Luis Jorge Boone’s The Cannibal Night were published in 2012 by Alligator Press.


  • Laura Hernandez is a WLT intern completing a master’s in professional writing at the University of Oklahoma. An avid reader of young-adult literature, Hernandez is currently writing a novel for young adults. 


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