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  • Feyziyye was born in 1982. She works as a newspaper journalist in Baku. She has published one book of poetry, Message. Her poetry takes up themes of war and displacement.

  • Photo by Radek Kobietski

    Julia Fiedorczuk (b. 1975) is a Polish poet, prose writer, translator, and lecturer in American literature at the University in Warsaw. She has published five books of poetry, a collection of short stories, and a novel. Her first book, November on the Narew, was awarded the prize for the best debut of the years 2000–2003 (Poznań, 2003). She is also a recipient of the Hubert Burda Preis (Vienna, 2005). Her work has been translated into nineteen languages.

  • Nancy Finn teaches dramatic literature and Irish studies in the English Department at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and theater studies in the Performing Arts Department at Emerson College. She received her PhD in theater from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her research interests include modern and contemporary Irish theater and drama, contemporary women playwrights, and theater historiography. She is also an actor and dramaturge. She is currently writing a monograph on the work of Marina Carr. 

  • A native of Naples, Peppe Fiore lives and works in Rome. In addition to Nessuno è indispensabile, he is the author of two short-story collections and a second novel, La futura classe dirigente (The future ruling class). His interest in writing about the world of work, he says, is tied to the way “working life becomes a useful framework for understanding how we function as a species.”

  • Dolores Flores-Silva, from the Mexican Gulf state of Veracruz, teaches Latin American literature and culture at Roanoke College. She is co-author of The Cross and the Sword in the Works of Rosario Ferré and Mayra Montero (2009) and has written on topics such as Mexican and Hispano-Caribbean literatures and cultures, Chicano Studies, and—most recently—the US South. Her publications as a poet, playwright, and translator traverse languages and borders.

  • Ru Freeman ( is a Sri Lankan–born writer and activist. Her first novel, A Disobedient Girl, was published in the United States and translated into eight foreign languages. Her political journalism appears internationally in English and in Arabic translation. An excerpt of Freeman's writing appeared in the September 2010 issue of WLT.

  • Max Frisch (1911-1991) was a Swiss novelist and playwright. Frisch's father suddenly passed away while he was studying at the University of Zurich, and Frisch had to abandon his studies and take up a job as a journalist, thus beginning his life-long career as a writer. His first novel was published in 1934, but his most active writing period occurred during the 1950s and 60s. Major themes in Frisch's works include identity, individuality, and political commitment. He is the laureate of the 1986 Neustadt Prize.

  • Sonja Fritzsche is Professor of German and Eastern European Studies at Illinois Wesleyan University. Her publications include Science-Fiction Literature in East Germany (2006) and The Liverpool Companion to World Science-Fiction Film (2014).

  • Photo by Alon Porat

    Tahel Frosh (b. 1977) has degrees in law and psychology and is currently working on a doctorate in literature. Her debut poetry collection, Betsa (Avarice. Jerusalem, Mossad Bialik, 2014), from which these poems have been chosen, was published in 2014 to wide acclaim. She also co-edited the anthology Avodat gilui (Unveiling work) and is a member of the art and social justice collective Cultural Guerrilla.

  • Danielle Fuller is a senior lecturer at the University of Birmingham (England).

  • Myrsini Gana was born in Athens, Greece. She studied English literature in Athens and cultural management in Brussels, Belgium. She has been translating literature for the last ten years and has translated into Greek most of David Sedaris’s books as well as works by Sylvia Plath, Jonathan Safran Foer, Kate Atkinson, Truman Capote, and others.

  • Gabriel García Márquez (b. 1927) was born in Aracataca, Colombia, where his maternal grandparents raised him for the first nine years of his life. He began his career in writing as a journalist while studying at the University of Cartagena, writing columns for the university's paper. In 1955 García Márquez published his first novella, La Hojarasca (tr. Leaf Storm, Penguin Books, 1972), a stream-of-consciousness story about a young boy's first encounter with death. But it would not be until the publication of Cien años de soledad (1967; tr. One Hundred Years of Solitude, Avon, 1970) that he would become the literary figure he remains to this day. He won the 1972 Neustadt Prize.

  • Pedro García-Caro is Assistant Professor of Spanish at the University of Oregon. His research focuses on the relations between nationalist narratives and the discourses of progress and modernity as seen by intellectuals and writers in Latin America, the US, and Spain. 

  • Dana Gioia is the author of three collections of poetry, including the 2002 American Book Award winner Interrogations at Noon. Also an influential critic, Gioia's 1991 collection of essays, Can Poetry Matter?, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His new collection, Pity the Beautiful, is forthcoming from Graywolf Press in 2012. A translator, librettist, and former chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, Gioia spoke with WLT's managing editor about the revival of form and narrative in poetry, his "idiosyncratic poetics," and his collaborations with artists in different disciplines inside the September 2011 issue.

  • Polona Glavan’s (b. 1974) first novel, Noc v Evropi (A night in Europe), was published in 2001 and shortlisted for the Kresnik Prize for best Slovenian novel. She followed it with a short-story collection, Gverilci (Guerillas), in which the story published here appears. 

  • Rebecca Newberger Goldstein is the author of nine books, including Incompleteness: The Proof and Paradox of Kurt Gödel, which was chosen by Discover magazine as one of the ten best science books published in 2005, and Betraying Spinoza: The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity, which won the Koret International Award for Jewish Thought. She has won numerous awards for her fiction and nonfiction, including a MacArthur “genius” grant. The paperback edition of her latest novel, 36 Arguments for the Existence of God: A Work of Fiction, is forthcoming in February 2011.

  • Adam J. Goldwyn is an assistant professor of English at North Dakota State University, where he specializes in Greek literature. His article “Joseph Eliyia and the Jewish Question in Greece: Zionism, Hellenism, and the Struggle for Modernity” appeared in the October 2015 issue of Journal of Modern Greek Studies.

  • An American expatriate, Maria Golia ( lives in Cairo near Liberation Square. Her work revisits popular preconceptions regarding cultural differences in order to emphasize the human constant, the dreams and schemes that drive us all (see WLT, March 2012, 42).

  • Rain C. Goméz won the Native Writers’ Circle of the Americas 2009 First Book Award (Poetry) for Smoked Mullet Cornbread Crawdad Memory (Mongrel Empire Press, 2012). Currently working on her dissertation, “Gumbo Banaha Stories: Locating Louisiana Indians and Creoles in the Indigenous Diaspora of the American South,” she has also completed a second manuscript of poetry, “Miscegenation Round Dance: Poèmes Historiques.” Goméz’s writings have been published in SING: Indigenous Poetry of the AmericasAmerican Indian Culture and Research Journal, and others.

  • Bárbara Renaud González was born in Texas, in the shadow of the Goliad Mission and el golfo. Her father was a sharecropper from the King Ranch, and her mother sold chiclets on the streets in Mexico. Her first novel, Golondrina, Why Did You Leave Me? (University of Texas Press, 2009), is based on her mother’s story.

  • Belén Gopegui was born in Madrid, where she studied law and later worked as a newspaper columnist. Her first novel, La escala de los mapas, won the Tigre Juan prize and the Iberoamericano Santiago del Nuevo Extremo prize for first novels. Sergio Prim, the novel’s narrator and protagonist, is a geographer by trade with a broken radar when it comes to navigating human relationships. He is thrown into a psychological crisis by the romantic advances of Brezo Varela, a fellow geographer, and reacts by immersing himself in an obsessive metaphysical quest: mapping the route to a place where love never results in disillusionment. The novel is a mercilessly revealing examination of a meager and fearful life challenged by desire. La escala de los mapas established Gopegui as one of Spain’s outstanding novelists, a judgment that her six subsequent novels have only served to confirm. Gopegui also writes screenplays.

  • Branko Gorjup is editor of the Peter Paul Series of Contemporary English Canadian Poets for Longo Editore, Ravenna, a series that includes bilingual selections by Irving Layton, Gwendolyn MacEwen, P. K. Page, Al Purdy, Margaret Atwood, Michael Ondaatje, and Margaret Avison. In addition to several anthologies of short fiction by Canadian authors, Gorjup has prepared a selection of critical essays on Leon Rooke, which will be published this spring by Exile Editions of Toronto. Presently, he teaches Canadian literature at the University “S. Pio V” in Rome.

  • 2008 Neustadt Prize Laureate Patricia Grace was born in Wellington, New Zealand, and now lives on the ancestral land of her father's people in Plimmerton, a small coastal community. Grace has been writing and publishing since the mid-1970s. Her previous awards include the New Zealand Fiction Award in 1987 and the Frankfurt Liberaturepreis in 1994 for her novel Potiki, which has been translated into several languages. She received the Hubert Church Prose Award for Best First Book for Waiariki in 1976. Dogside Story won the Kiriyama Pacific Rim Fiction Prize in 2001 and was also long-listed for the Booker Prize. Her novel Tu was awarded the Deutz Medal for fiction at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2005.

  • Anne Greeott’s translations have appeared in Bitter Oleander, Journal of Italian Translation, Italian Poetry Review, Atticus Review, and are forthcoming in Poetry Northwest.

  • Suzette R. Grillot is Dean of the College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma, where she also serves as the William J. Crowe Jr. Chair in Geopolitics and Vice Provost of International Programs.

  • Cuban writer Charo Guerra (b. María del Rosario Guerra Ayala; Limonar, Matanzas, 1962) is author of the poetry collections Un sitio bajo el cielo (1991;, Vámonos a Icaria (1998), winner of the prestigious New Pines Prize; and Luna de los pobres (2011), awarded the José Jacinto Milanés Prize. She has also written the short-story collection Pasajes de la vida breve (2007). 

  • Lee Gutkind is founder and editor of Creative Nonfiction (, the first and largest literary magazine in the world to publish nonfiction narrative exclusively. Gutkind is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at Arizona State University. His most recent book is You Can’t Make This Stuff Up: The Complete Guide to Writing Creative Nonfiction—From Memoir to Literary Journalism and Everything in Between.

  • Paavo Haavikko (1931-2008) was a Finnish poet and playwright. He published his first collection of poetry in 1951, at the age of twenty. After three more poetry collections, two three-act plays, and two novels, Haavikko's first English-translated piece was published in 1961. He is the laureate of the 1984 Neustadt Prize.

  • Hedy Habra ( is the author of two poetry collections, Tea in Heliopolis (2013), winner of the USA Best Book Award and finalist for the International Poetry Book Award, and Under Brushstrokes (2015), inspired by visual art. Recipient of the Nazim Hikmet Poetry Award, she is also the author of a story collection, Flying Carpets (2013), winner of the Arab American National Book Award’s Honorable Mention.