Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Brian Fanelli’s poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in a number of magazines and journals, most recently Oklahoma Review, Spillway, Boston Literary Magazine, Portland Review, and Third Wednesday. Fanelli is the author of one chapbook, Front Man (Big Table Publishing), and the full-length collection All That Remains, forthcoming soon from Unbound Content. Prior to working as a full-time English instructor at Lackawanna College, Fanelli worked a number of jobs, including country clerk, factory worker, and adjunct instructor. He has an MFA from Wilkes University and is currently a PhD student at SUNY Binghamton.



  • Nuruddin Farah (b. 1945) was born in the Italian-ruled southern region of Somalia, Baidoa. His mother was a traditional storyteller, and his father was a merchant who later worked for the British government as an interpreter. Farah lived in a multilingual environment and learned to speak Somali, Amharic, English, Italian, and Arabic. When he began to write, Farah chose English as the language of his works. His first novel, From A Crooked Rib (1970), depicts the authoritarian role of patriarchy in African society and earned Farah praise as a "male feminist." The publication of his second novel, A Naked Needle (1976), angered the Somalian dictatorial regime and finally forced Farah into exile after receiving death threats. Farah would not return to live in Somalia again, but his lifelong pursuit is to keep his country through his writing.



  • Photo by Radek Kobietski

    Julia Fiedorczuk (b. 1975) is a Polish poet, prose writer, translator, and lecturer in American literature at the University in Warsaw. She has published five books of poetry, a collection of short stories, and a novel. Her first book, November on the Narew, was awarded the prize for the best debut of the years 2000–2003 (Poznań, 2003). She is also a recipient of the Hubert Burda Preis (Vienna, 2005). Her work has been translated into nineteen languages.


  • Nancy Finn teaches dramatic literature and Irish studies in the English Department at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and theater studies in the Performing Arts Department at Emerson College. She received her PhD in theater from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her research interests include modern and contemporary Irish theater and drama, contemporary women playwrights, and theater historiography. She is also an actor and dramaturge. She is currently writing a monograph on the work of Marina Carr. 


  • A native of Naples, Peppe Fiore lives and works in Rome. In addition to Nessuno è indispensabile, he is the author of two short-story collections and a second novel, La futura classe dirigente (The future ruling class). His interest in writing about the world of work, he says, is tied to the way “working life becomes a useful framework for understanding how we function as a species.”


  • Ru Freeman (www.rufreeman.com) is a Sri Lankan–born writer and activist. Her first novel, A Disobedient Girl, was published in the United States and translated into eight foreign languages. Her political journalism appears internationally in English and in Arabic translation. An excerpt of Freeman's writing appeared in the September 2010 issue of WLT.



  • Max Frisch (1911-1991) was a Swiss novelist and playwright. Frisch's father suddenly passed away while he was studying at the University of Zurich, and Frisch had to abandon his studies and take up a job as a journalist, thus beginning his life-long career as a writer. His first novel was published in 1934, but his most active writing period occurred during the 1950s and 60s. Major themes in Frisch's works include identity, individuality, and political commitment. He is the laureate of the 1986 Neustadt Prize.


  • Sonja Fritzsche is Professor of German and Eastern European Studies at Illinois Wesleyan University. Her publications include Science-Fiction Literature in East Germany (2006) and The Liverpool Companion to World Science-Fiction Film (2014).



  • Danielle Fuller is a senior lecturer at the University of Birmingham (England).



  • Myrsini Gana was born in Athens, Greece. She studied English literature in Athens and cultural management in Brussels, Belgium. She has been translating literature for the last ten years and has translated into Greek most of David Sedaris’s books as well as works by Sylvia Plath, Jonathan Safran Foer, Kate Atkinson, Truman Capote, and others.



  • Gabriel García Márquez (b. 1927) was born in Aracataca, Colombia, where his maternal grandparents raised him for the first nine years of his life. He began his career in writing as a journalist while studying at the University of Cartagena, writing columns for the university's paper. In 1955 García Márquez published his first novella, La Hojarasca (tr. Leaf Storm, Penguin Books, 1972), a stream-of-consciousness story about a young boy's first encounter with death. But it would not be until the publication of Cien años de soledad (1967; tr. One Hundred Years of Solitude, Avon, 1970) that he would become the literary figure he remains to this day. He won the 1972 Neustadt Prize.


  • Pedro García-Caro is Assistant Professor of Spanish at the University of Oregon. His research focuses on the relations between nationalist narratives and the discourses of progress and modernity as seen by intellectuals and writers in Latin America, the US, and Spain. 



  • Dana Gioia is the author of three collections of poetry, including the 2002 American Book Award winner Interrogations at Noon. Also an influential critic, Gioia's 1991 collection of essays, Can Poetry Matter?, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His new collection, Pity the Beautiful, is forthcoming from Graywolf Press in 2012. A translator, librettist, and former chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, Gioia spoke with WLT's managing editor about the revival of form and narrative in poetry, his "idiosyncratic poetics," and his collaborations with artists in different disciplines inside the September 2011 issue.


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