The Once Over

  • Barracks, Tule Lake Relocation Center, 2001
    November 26, 2014 | Todd Stewart
    Todd Stewart, Placing Memory: A Photographic Exploration of Japanese American Internment (University of Oklahoma Press, 2008). By permission of the photographer. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, initiating the largest single forced relocation in United States history. After Pearl Harbor, the United States government considered Japanese Am...
  • The May 2014 issue of WLT
    August 20, 2014 | Jim Drummond
    In WLT’s May 2014 issue, I was especially intrigued by the article on Mass Reading Events (MREs) by Danielle Fuller and DeNel Rehberg Sedo. In 2010 I attended a marathon reading of Frederic Tuten’s novel The Adventures of Mao on the Long March, on the occasion of the fortieth anniversary of its publication, in the beautiful Jane Hotel in New York City. Sixty readers and a few hu...
  • July 8, 2013 | Ray Taras
    From the poets of princes known as Beirdd y Tywysogion to Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven,” the history, mythology, and landscape of Wales—and her border collies—have inspired generations of writers. They have inhabited the hills of Wales for a thousand years. One of Zin’s great-great-great grandsires was called Mirk. Her paternal great-great-great granddam...
  • A dog in a purple turtleneck sweater
    July 2, 2013 | Warren Motte
    “Dogs bark,” writes Warren Motte, “for the same reasons that I write: it’s our way of coming to terms with things, gropingly, imprecisely, and as best we can.”  Photo: Thomas Hawk/Flickr I have never thought of myself as a sentimentalist, and I don’t believe that anyone who knows me even passingly well has thought of me in that way, either. Nor have I ever imagined myself to be a good h...
  • May 8, 2013 | WLT
    Emily Johnson, Associate Professor of Russian in the University of Oklahoma’s Department of Modern Languages, Literatures & Linguistics, is a longtime contributing editor to World Literature Today. After seeing Essaydi’s photo-essay “Disrupting the Odalisque” in the March 2013 issue of WLT, Professor Johnson sent us the following questions, to which Ms. Essaydi...
  • December 20, 2012 | Jim Drummond
    Photo Joe Gratz/Flickr As a criminal defense lawyer with a sometime focus on capital defense who has published fiction and poetry, your issue focused on law-inspired literature was particularly gratifying. I was amazed to learn that every defender’s hero, Clarence Darrow, was the law partner of Edgar Lee Masters. I had never read Masters because I assumed he was one of the rather oracular icons...
  • December 13, 2012 | Clay Stockton
    Reading the portfolio of law-inspired literature in WLT's November/December 2012 issue, I found myself lingering over not only the contents, but that little string of characters on the cover that tells the price. That tiny datum loitering down by the bar code, hidden in plain sight, tells a story about the law, just like the narratives in the portfolio. It even talks back to them. The s...
  • October 8, 2012 | Brian Hewes, David Shook
      Going behind the scenes of WLT’s September issue, poet, translator, and documentary filmmaker David Shook talks with Brian Hewes about making his new documentary, Kilometer Zero, a journey that began in police detention in Malabo. Brian Hewes: I’m interested in the genesis of Kilometer Zero—it’s not the type of project just anyone comes up with. Wher...
  • Cat in a sunny room
    September 19, 2012 | Warren Motte
    Photo by Michael McKelvaney/Flickr I read Robert Shapard’s remarks about “flash” fiction in the September 2012 issue of WLT with a great deal of interest. Having spent quite a bit of time in my own career parsing minimalist fiction (and having published a book on that very subject several years ago), I was intrigued to learn that the objects of Shapard’s inquiry are typically far more b...