Authors

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  • Photo by Susan Seubert

    Samiya Bashir’s work has recently appeared in Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia F–K (vol. 2). Her most recent book of poems, Gospel, was a finalist for both the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and, along with her first collection, Where the Apple Falls, the Lambda Literary Award.



  • Photo by Antonio Reyes

    Aicha Bassry was born in Ben Ahmad, Morocco in 1969. Her publications include massā’āt (2000; Evenings); araqu al-malā’ikah (2003; Angels’ insomnia); laylah sari`atu al `atab (2007; A fragile night); and khulwatu al tayr (2010; The bird’s seclusion), from which the present extracts are taken. Her poems have also been translated into Spanish, French, Turkish, and Italian.



  • Askold Bazhanov is a Skolt Saami poet writing in the Russian language. He was born in 1934 in the village of Notozero, Murmansk district, Russia. After the Second World War he relocated to Leningrad to study in the Department of the Peoples of the North, a special sector for ethnic minorities created under the auspices of Gertsen State Pedagogical University. Upon returning home to the historically Saami lands near Lovozero township, he began writing poetry while working in various occupations: as a miner, a railroad technician, a tractor operator, and a reindeer herder. His best-known publications include Solntse nad tundroi (Sun over the tundra, 1983) and Belyi Olen’ (The white reindeer, 1996). The main themes of his poetry include the struggle to preserve indigenous cultural identity in the face of encroaching modernity; surviving the hardships of collectivization, war, and economic exploitation; and the intimate, spiritual connections between humans and the natural world. His work has been translated into English and various dialects of Saami.



  • Alison Bechdel (/ˈbɛkdəl/ bek-dəl; born September 10, 1960) is an American cartoonist. Originally best known for the long-running comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For, she came to critical and commercial success in 2006 with her graphic memoir Fun Home.


  • Merleyn Bell is the art director at World Literature Today.



  • Hakim Bellamy became the inaugural poet laureate of Albuquerque on April 14, 2012, at age thirty-three. He was the son of a preacher man (and a praying woman). Bellamy has been on two national champion poetry slam teams, won collegiate and city poetry slam championships (in Albuquerque and Silver City, NM), and has been published in numerous anthologies and on inner-city buses. A musician, actor, journalist, playwright, and community organizer, Bellamy’s first book, Swear, was recently published by West End Press.



  • Igor Belov was born in 1975 in St. Petersburg and currently lives in Kaliningrad. He is the author of two books of poetry: Ves' etot dzhazz (2004; All that jazz) and Muzika ne dlia tolstykh (2008; Music not for fat people). His poetry has been translated into Swedish, German, Polish, Estonian, Ukrainian, and Belorussian, and he has been recognized with awards and grants in Russia, Sweden, and Poland.



  • Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979) was born in Massachussetts. Her father died when she was very young, and as a result of the heartbreak, her mother was committed to an institution in 1916. Bishop never reunited with her mother and was subsequently raised by her grandparents. Though she dabbled with poetry while in school, Bishop left home to attend Vassar College for music composition in 1929. After suffering a bout of stage fright, she changed her focus to English literature. Following her graduation from college, Bishop spent the rest of her life traveling, writing poetry, and teaching at various colleges around the United States. She is the 1976 laureate of the Neustadt Prize.



  • William Black teaches creative writing at the Johns Hopkins University. His stories have appeared in The Sun, Southern Review, Threepenny Review, and elsewhere.



  • Jen Rickard Blair is the digital media editor at World Literature Today.



  • Ana Blandiana, one of Romania’s foremost poets, was a leading dissident before the fall of Communism. President of the Romanian PEN Club and founder and president of the Civic Alliance (1991–2001), an organization fighting for civil rights and democracy, she created the Memorial for the Victims of Communism (1993) under the aegis of the European Community. In recognition of her contributions to European culture, Blandiana was awarded the Légion d’Honneur (2009). My Native Land A4 (2010) has been published in English by Bloodaxe Books.



  • Yves Bonnefoy (born 24 June 1923) is a French poet and essayist. Bonnefoy was born in Tours, Indre-et-Loire, the son of a railroad worker and a teacher. His works have been of great importance in post-war French literature, at the same time poetic and theoretical, examining the meaning of the spoken and written word. He has also published a number of translations, most notably Shakespeare as well as several works on art and art history, including Miró and Giacometti.



  • Photo by Hector Munoz

    From Monclova, Coahuila, Mexico, Luis Jorge Boone is the author of eleven books including novels, books of poetry, and short-story collections. He is the winner of numerous literary prizes, including the Cuento Inés Arredondo (2005), Poesía Joven Elías Nandino (2007), the Carlos Echánove Trujillo Literary Prize for Essay (2009), and the Premio Ramón López Velarde (2009). The English edition of his short-story collection The Cannibal Night, translated by George Henson, will appear later this year.



  • For over thirty years Phil Borges has been documenting indigenous and tribal cultures, striving to create an understanding of the challenges they face. His work is exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide, and his award-winning books include, most recently, Tibet: Culture on the Edge. He has hosted television documentaries on indigenous cultures for Discovery and National Geographic. In 2004 Phil was honored with a Lucie at the International Photography Awards for his humanitarian work. He lectures and teaches internationally, and his current projects focus on social and economic gender issues in the developing world. His exhibition Stirring the Fire will open at the University of Oklahoma's Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art on April 12, 2013, during the Puterbaugh Festival of International Literature and Culture.



  • Recaredo Silebo Boturu (b. Baresó, 1979) is a poet, playwright, narrator, essayist, actor, and theater director from Equatorial Guinea. His writings expound on social issues while salvaging and rearticulating oral traditions. Author of the short story La danza de la abuela (2011; The grandmother’s dance), he is best known for his book of poetry and drama, Luz en la noche (2010; Light in the night). Presently, he is finishing a second book, Soliloquio (Soliloquy). Boturu’s work is at the heart of the theatrical activity in his country. He directs the theater company Bocamandja, which has performed in Spain and Colombia. In addition to working closely with other theater companies in Malabo and Bata, he is a key member of Orígenes, a Spanish-Guinean independent theatrical association that seeks to establish a national theater company in Equatorial Guinea.



  • Photo by John Clifford

    Called “one of the most revolutionary voices in Latin America today” by PEN, Giannina Braschi creates linguistic and structural hybrids of poetry, fiction, essay, musical, manifesto, treatise, and drama. She is the cutting-edge author of the postmodern poetry trilogy El imperio de los sueños / Empire of Dreams; the experimental Spanglish novel Yo-Yo Boing!; and a philosophical work of dramatic fiction, United States of Banana. Born in Puerto Rico, she lives in New York.



  • Kamau Brathwaite (b. 1930), a poet, historian, literary critic, and essayist, was born in Bridgetown, the capital city of Barbados. Brathwaite spent his childhood in Barbados but would spend his adult life traveling, learning, and teaching all over the globe. He attended Harrison University in Barbados and Pembroke College in Cambridge, England, where he graduated with honors in 1953. After graduating from Cambridge, Brathwaite embarked on a journey to Ghana where he worked in Ghana's Ministy of Education for more than ten years. Brathwaite familiarized himself with Ghanaian traditional verse and pre-colonial African myths, which would be influencial to his own writing. Later on, he earned his PhD in Philosophy from the University of Sussex in 1968. He has taught at Harvard University, the University of the West Indies, and New York University. He won the 1994 Neustadt Prize.



  • Photo by Tammy Streets

    Jeanne Bryner was born in Appalachia and grew up in Newton Falls, Ohio. A practicing registered nurse, she is a graduate of Trumbull Memorial’s School of Nursing and Kent State University’s Honors College. She has received writing fellowships from Bucknell University, the Ohio Arts Council (1997, 2007), and Vermont Studio Center. Her poetry has been adapted for the stage and performed in Ohio, West Virginia, New York, Kentucky, and Edinburgh, Scotland. With the support of Hiram College’s Center for Literature, Medicine, and Biomedical Humanities, her nursing poetry has been adapted for the stage and performed by Verb Ballets, Cleveland, Ohio. She has a new play, Foxglove Canyon, and her books in print are Breathless, Blind Horse: Poems, Eclipse: Stories, Tenderly Lift Me: Nurses Honored, Celebrated and Remembered, No Matter How Many Windows, The Wedding of Miss Meredith Mouse, and Smoke: Poems, which received an American Journal of Nursing 2012 Book of the Year Award.    


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