Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • For more than thirty years Phil Borges has been documenting indigenous and tribal cultures, striving to create an understanding of the challenges they face. His work is exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide, and his award-winning books include, most recently, Tibet: Culture on the Edge. He has hosted television documentaries on indigenous cultures for Discovery and National Geographic. In 2004 Phil was honored with a Lucie at the International Photography Awards for his humanitarian work. He lectures and teaches internationally, and his current projects focus on social and economic gender issues in the developing world.



  • Recaredo Silebo Boturu (b. Baresó, 1979) is a poet, playwright, narrator, essayist, actor, and theater director from Equatorial Guinea. His writings expound on social issues while salvaging and rearticulating oral traditions. Author of the short story La danza de la abuela (2011; The grandmother’s dance), he is best known for his book of poetry and drama, Luz en la noche (2010; Light in the night). Presently, he is finishing a second book, Soliloquio (Soliloquy). Boturu’s work is at the heart of the theatrical activity in his country. He directs the theater company Bocamandja, which has performed in Spain and Colombia. In addition to working closely with other theater companies in Malabo and Bata, he is a key member of Orígenes, a Spanish-Guinean independent theatrical association that seeks to establish a national theater company in Equatorial Guinea.


  • Rashid Boudjedra (b. 1941) is an Algerian poet, playwright, novelist, and critic.



  • Photo by David Boullata

    Issa J. Boullata (b. 1929) is a Palestinian scholar, writer, and translator of Arabic literature. He has authored several books on Arabic literature, poetry, and the Qur'an, and has written numerous articles and book reviews for scholarly journals and encyclopedias. He is a two-time winner of the Arkansas Arabic Translation Award and a contributing editor of Banipal magazine of London.


  • Carmen Boullosa (b. 1954) is a Mexican poet, novelist, and playwright. Her work focuses on issues of feminism and gender roles.


  • Christopher Bram (b. 1952) is an American author who has written numerous novels, articles, essays, and screenplays. He became a Guggenheim Fellow in 2001, a recipient of the Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement from Publishing Triangle in 2003, and his book Eminent Outlaws: The Gay Writers Who Changed America won the Randy Shilts Award in 2013. He currently teaches at New York University.



  • Photo by John Clifford

    Called “one of the most revolutionary voices in Latin America today” by PEN, Giannina Braschi creates linguistic and structural hybrids of poetry, fiction, essay, musical, manifesto, treatise, and drama. She is the cutting-edge author of the postmodern poetry trilogy El imperio de los sueños / Empire of Dreams; the experimental Spanglish novel Yo-Yo Boing!; and a philosophical work of dramatic fiction, United States of Banana. Born in Puerto Rico, she lives in New York.



  • Kamau Brathwaite (b. 1930), a poet, historian, literary critic, and essayist, was born in Bridgetown, the capital city of Barbados. Brathwaite spent his childhood in Barbados but would spend his adult life traveling, learning, and teaching all over the globe. He attended Harrison University in Barbados and Pembroke College in Cambridge, England, where he graduated with honors in 1953. After graduating from Cambridge, Brathwaite embarked on a journey to Ghana where he worked in Ghana's Ministy of Education for more than ten years. Brathwaite familiarized himself with Ghanaian traditional verse and pre-colonial African myths, which would be influencial to his own writing. Later on, he earned his PhD in Philosophy from the University of Sussex in 1968. He has taught at Harvard University, the University of the West Indies, and New York University. He won the 1994 Neustadt Prize.


  • Courtney Angela Brkic (b. 1972) is Croatian American memoirist, short story writer, and academic. Her work has appeared in several prestigious publications, including The New York Times, Utne Reader, and National Geographic. She currently lives outside of Washington, DC, and teaches at George Mason University.


  • Nathan Brown is a poet, singer-songwriter, and photographer.


  • Fleda Brown (b. 1944) is an American poet and author.


  • Andy Brown is a poet, critic, and Director of the Centre for Creative Writing at Exeter University.



  • Photo by Tammy Streets

    Jeanne Bryner was born in Appalachia and grew up in Newton Falls, Ohio. A practicing registered nurse, she is a graduate of Trumbull Memorial’s School of Nursing and Kent State University’s Honors College. She has received writing fellowships from Bucknell University, the Ohio Arts Council (1997, 2007), and Vermont Studio Center. Her poetry has been adapted for the stage and performed in Ohio, West Virginia, New York, Kentucky, and Edinburgh, Scotland. With the support of Hiram College’s Center for Literature, Medicine, and Biomedical Humanities, her nursing poetry has been adapted for the stage and performed by Verb Ballets, Cleveland, Ohio. She has a new play, Foxglove Canyon, and her books in print are Breathless, Blind Horse: Poems, Eclipse: Stories, Tenderly Lift Me: Nurses Honored, Celebrated and Remembered, No Matter How Many Windows, The Wedding of Miss Meredith Mouse, and Smoke: Poems, which received an American Journal of Nursing 2012 Book of the Year Award.    


  • Christopher Buckly is the author of eighteen books of poetry, and the 2009 recipient of the Tampa Review Prize for Poetry for Rolling the Bones. He teaches in the Creative Writing Department at the University of California Riverside.


  • NoViolet Bulawayo (b. 1981) is a Zimbabwean author. In 2013, her debut novel, We Need New Names, made her the first black African woman and the first Zimbabwean to be shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. It also won the Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award and the Etisalat Prize for Literature.



  • Photo by Thoraya El-Rayyes

    Hisham Bustani (b. 1975, Amman, Jordan) writes fiction and has three published collections of short fiction: Of Love and Death (2008), The Monotonous Chaos of Existence (2010), and The Perception of Meaning (2012). The German review Inamo has chosen him as one of the Arab world’s emerging and influential new writers, translating one of his stories into German for its special issue on “New Arab Literature” (December 2009, www.inamo.de). Acclaimed for his contemporary themes, style, and language, he experiments with the boundaries of narration and poetry. He was recently featured in the March/April 2012 issue of Poets & Writers


  • Esthela Calderón (b. 1970, Nicaragua) is the author of Soledad (2002), which won the Juegos Florales Centroamericanos prize; Amor y conciencia (2004), and Soplo de Corriente vital: poemas etnobotánicos(2008). She also wrote a novel set during the 1979 Nicaraguan insurrection, 8 caras de una moneda (2006), co-authored Culture and Customs of Nicaragua (2008), and is currently general coordinator of the municipal theater in León, Nicaragua.


  • Wendy Call is the author of No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy, winner of the 2011 Grub Street National Book Prize for Nonfiction, and translator of Irma Pineda’s Zapotec-Spanish poetry into English.


  • Pablo Calvi (PhD, Columbia University, 2011) is an assistant professor at the Roy H. Park School of Communications, Ithaca College, where he teaches courses on multiplatform journalism and comparative narrative nonfiction. He is a guest lecturer in Columbia University / Universitat de Barcelona masters program in Barcelona, Spain, and has taught comparative Latin American and Anglo-American narrative journalism at CELSA, the Graduate School of Communications at Sorbonne University, in Paris, France. Calvi is also a professional journalist and a published author. He has worked for newspapers and investigative magazines in Argentina, Colombia, México, Brazil, and the United States. In 2001 he was the first Latino to earn a Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship in the history of the Pulitzer Prizes. He was also the recipient of the 2010 Greenberg Research Prize for Literary Journalism Studies and the winner of the 2010 CELSA-Sorbonne Writing Fellowship. His main interests are Latin American narrative journalism, crónica, and the correlation between democracy and the free press.



  • Photo by David Camp

    Lauren Camp is the author of This Business of Wisdom (2010) and editor of the poetry blog Which Silk Shirt. Each Sunday, she hosts Audio Saucepan, a global music/poetry program on Santa Fe Public Radio. She guest edited WLT’s special section on international jazz poetry in the March 2011 issue. “Letter to Baghdad” begins her manuscript-in-progress, One Hundred Hungers. In 2012 she received the Anna Davidson Rosenberg Poetry Award for another poem from this project.

    To learn more, visit www.laurencamp.com.


  • Can Xue (b. 1953) is a Chinese writer and literary critic. She is the author of numerous novels, volumes of literary criticism, and short works of fiction. She currently lives in Beijing.


  • Paola Capriolo (b. 1962) is an Italian novelist, a reviewer for Corriere della Sera, and a translator of German fiction. Her own work has been translated into English, French, Spanish, German, Danish, Dutch, and Japanese.


  • Matt Carney is the online editor for Oklahoma Gazette, Oklahoma City's alt-weekly newspaper. A 2011 graduate of the University of Oklahoma Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication, he worked as an editorial intern for WLT during his last semester of college. He resides in Norman, Oklahoma.


  • Emmanuel Carrère (b. 1957) is a French author, screenwriter, and director. Many of his works have been made into films, one of which (La Moustache, 2005) he personally directed.


  • Anne Carson (b. 1950) is a Canadian poet, essayist, translator, and professor of Classics.


  • Monica Carter is project coordinator for Lambda Literary Foundation’s LGBT Writers in Schools program. She is also a judge for the Best Translated Book award and curates her own website, Salonica World Lit, dedicated to international literature. Her fiction has appeared in Strange Cargo, The Rattling Wall, Black Clock, Bloom, and Cactus Heart. She is finishing her novel, In the Life.


  • Roberto Castillo Udiarte is one of Mexico’s most important and controversial contemporary poets; he was also the first to translate Charles Bukowski’s work into Spanish. His poetry unflinchingly reflects the landscape and language of the border, specifically Tijuana. He is the author of half a dozen collections of poetry, including his selected poems, Nuestras vidas son otras, published in Spain by Aullido Libros. He currently resides in Playas Tijuana.


  • Raquel Castro Maldonado (b. 1976, Mexico City) is a writer, scriptwriter, professor, and cultural promoter. In 2012 she won the Gran Angular Prize for Young-Adult Literature and is a two-time winner of the National Journalism Prize as part of the production team for OnceTV’s Diálogos en confianza. She is the author of two novels, Ojos llenos de sombra (2012) and Lejos de casa (2013). She writes a weekly column on children’s and young-adult literature for La Jornada Aguascalientes and blogs at http://raxxie.com. Castro is married to author Alberto Chimal, whose work appeared in the July 2013 issue of WLT. They live in Mexico City with their cats Primo, Morris, Pulgas, and Beakman.


  • C. P. Cavafy (b. 1863, d. 1933) was a Greek poet who worked in Alexandria as a journalist and a civil servant.


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