Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z

  • Photo by Tammy Streets

    Jeanne Bryner was born in Appalachia and grew up in Newton Falls, Ohio. A practicing registered nurse, she is a graduate of Trumbull Memorial’s School of Nursing and Kent State University’s Honors College. She has received writing fellowships from Bucknell University, the Ohio Arts Council (1997, 2007), and Vermont Studio Center. Her poetry has been adapted for the stage and performed in Ohio, West Virginia, New York, Kentucky, and Edinburgh, Scotland. With the support of Hiram College’s Center for Literature, Medicine, and Biomedical Humanities, her nursing poetry has been adapted for the stage and performed by Verb Ballets, Cleveland, Ohio. She has a new play, Foxglove Canyon, and her books in print are Breathless, Blind Horse: Poems, Eclipse: Stories, Tenderly Lift Me: Nurses Honored, Celebrated and Remembered, No Matter How Many Windows, The Wedding of Miss Meredith Mouse, and Smoke: Poems, which received an American Journal of Nursing 2012 Book of the Year Award.    



  • Photo by Thoraya El-Rayyes

    Hisham Bustani (b. 1975, Amman, Jordan) writes fiction and has three published collections of short fiction: Of Love and Death (2008), The Monotonous Chaos of Existence (2010), and The Perception of Meaning (2012). The German review Inamo has chosen him as one of the Arab world’s emerging and influential new writers, translating one of his stories into German for its special issue on “New Arab Literature” (December 2009, www.inamo.de). Acclaimed for his contemporary themes, style, and language, he experiments with the boundaries of narration and poetry. He was recently featured in the March/April 2012 issue of Poets & Writers


  • Esthela Calderón (b. 1970, Nicaragua) is the author of Soledad (2002), which won the Juegos Florales Centroamericanos prize; Amor y conciencia (2004), and Soplo de Corriente vital: poemas etnobotánicos(2008). She also wrote a novel set during the 1979 Nicaraguan insurrection, 8 caras de una moneda (2006), co-authored Culture and Customs of Nicaragua (2008), and is currently general coordinator of the municipal theater in León, Nicaragua.


  • Wendy Call is the author of No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy, winner of the 2011 Grub Street National Book Prize for Nonfiction, and translator of Irma Pineda’s Zapotec-Spanish poetry into English.


  • Pablo Calvi (PhD, Columbia University, 2011) is an assistant professor at the Roy H. Park School of Communications, Ithaca College, where he teaches courses on multiplatform journalism and comparative narrative nonfiction. He is a guest lecturer in Columbia University / Universitat de Barcelona masters program in Barcelona, Spain, and has taught comparative Latin American and Anglo-American narrative journalism at CELSA, the Graduate School of Communications at Sorbonne University, in Paris, France. Calvi is also a professional journalist and a published author. He has worked for newspapers and investigative magazines in Argentina, Colombia, México, Brazil, and the United States. In 2001 he was the first Latino to earn a Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship in the history of the Pulitzer Prizes. He was also the recipient of the 2010 Greenberg Research Prize for Literary Journalism Studies and the winner of the 2010 CELSA-Sorbonne Writing Fellowship. His main interests are Latin American narrative journalism, crónica, and the correlation between democracy and the free press.



  • Photo by David Camp

    Lauren Camp is the author of This Business of Wisdom (2010) and editor of the poetry blog Which Silk Shirt. Each Sunday, she hosts Audio Saucepan, a global music/poetry program on Santa Fe Public Radio. She guest edited WLT’s special section on international jazz poetry in the March 2011 issue. “Letter to Baghdad” begins her manuscript-in-progress, One Hundred Hungers. In 2012 she received the Anna Davidson Rosenberg Poetry Award for another poem from this project.

    To learn more, visit www.laurencamp.com.


  • Matt Carney is the online editor for Oklahoma Gazette, Oklahoma City's alt-weekly newspaper. A 2011 graduate of the University of Oklahoma Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication, he worked as an editorial intern for WLT during his last semester of college. He resides in Norman, Oklahoma.


  • Monica Carter is project coordinator for Lambda Literary Foundation’s LGBT Writers in Schools program. She is also a judge for the Best Translated Book award and curates her own website, Salonica World Lit, dedicated to international literature. Her fiction has appeared in Strange Cargo, The Rattling Wall, Black Clock, Bloom, and Cactus Heart. She is finishing her novel, In the Life.


  • Roberto Castillo Udiarte is one of Mexico’s most important and controversial contemporary poets; he was also the first to translate Charles Bukowski’s work into Spanish. His poetry unflinchingly reflects the landscape and language of the border, specifically Tijuana. He is the author of half a dozen collections of poetry, including his selected poems, Nuestras vidas son otras, published in Spain by Aullido Libros. He currently resides in Playas Tijuana.


  • Raquel Castro Maldonado (b. 1976, Mexico City) is a writer, scriptwriter, professor, and cultural promoter. In 2012 she won the Gran Angular Prize for Young-Adult Literature and is a two-time winner of the National Journalism Prize as part of the production team for OnceTV’s Diálogos en confianza. She is the author of two novels, Ojos llenos de sombra (2012) and Lejos de casa (2013). She writes a weekly column on children’s and young-adult literature for La Jornada Aguascalientes and blogs at http://raxxie.com. Castro is married to author Alberto Chimal, whose work appeared in the July 2013 issue of WLT. They live in Mexico City with their cats Primo, Morris, Pulgas, and Beakman.


  • Patrizia Cavalli (b. 1952) was born in Todi (Umbria) and now lives in Rome. Her first three volumes, Le mie poesie non cambieranno il mondo (1974), Il cielo (1981), and L'io singolare proprio mio (1992), are collected in Poesie (1974–92) (1992), and were followed by Sempre aperto teatro (1999) and Pigre divinità e pigra sorte (2006). She has also translated plays by Molière and Shakespeare. "La giornata atlantica," the poem translated here, is from her third collection.


  • Ermanno Cavazzoni (b. 1947), from Reggio Emilia, is the award-winning author of many fantastic and absurd tales. Of his many books, including Vite brevi di idioti, Cirenaica, Gli scrittori inutili, Storia naturale dei giganti, and Il limbo delle fantasticazioni, two novels have been published in English translation: The Nocturnal Library (Vagabond Voices, 2010) and Voice of the Moon (Serpent's Tail, 1990). He is also a professor at the University of Bologna and a member of the literary group OpLePo (www.oplepo.it). 


  • A student of literature and anthropology, Italian actor, director, and author Ascanio Celestini (b. 1972) is keenly interested in the commedia dell’arte and runs a number of workshops. Since his first play Cicoria (1998), centered on Pasolini, he has performed numerous monologues based on testimonies and encounters. His film La pecora nera (2010) was an official selection at the 67th Venice International Film Festival, and his latest story collection is titled Io cammino in fila indiana (Einaudi, 2011).


  • A Zimbabwean writer, Brian Chikwava is the author of the novel Harare North and winner of the 2004 Caine Prize for African Writing for his story "Seventh Street Alchemy." His essay "Free Speech in Zimbabwe: The Story of the Blue-Stomached Lizard" appeared in the September 2006 issue of WLT.


  • Alberto Chimal is regarded as one of Mexico’s most talented writers of short and experimental fiction. Since publishing his first books before his twenties, he has gained a loyal audience and cult-figure status. The recipient of numerous literary prizes, including the prestigious National Short Story Prize, he is the author of more than twenty books, including two novels, Los esclavos (2009) and La torre y el jardín (2012). A professor of literature and creative writing, Chimal lives in Mexico City with his wife and two cats and tweets stories at @albertochimal.



  • Eun-Gwi Chung is associate professor at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, Korea. She earned her PhD in poetics at SUNY Buffalo. She has translated many contemporary Korean poems into English. This article was supported by a 2013 research grant from Hankuk University of Foreign Studies. 


Pages