INTERVIEWS

  • In this exclusive WLT interview, poet Nathalie Handal talks about her new verse collection, the distinction between homeland and home, and her sources of strength. Poet in Andalucía is forthcoming from the University of Pittsburgh Press in January 2012.   Nathalie Handal. Photo by Ram Devineni. Kaitlin Bankston: In your new collection, Poet in Anda...
  • Laleh Khadivi. Photo by Ariel Zambelich. WLT: What recent book has captured your interest? Laleh Khadivi: W. G. Sebald and Roberto Bolaño call to me again and again. Their work dissolves the membrane between the events of history and the emotional core of our modern lives. They seem to converse with me, from their thoughts to the page t...
  •    May 2012
    Photo by Jörg Winger Anna Winger was raised in Kenya, Massachusetts, and Mexico. She is the author of the novel This Must Be the Place (Riverhead, 2008) and the creator of Berlin Stories, a radio show for NPR Worldwide (berlinstories.org). She lives in Berlin with her family.  WLT: Why Berlin? Anna Winger: I...
  •    March 2012
    David Small Introduction by Elizabeth R. Baer The following interview was conducted by Julia Tindell, a student in a course I taught at Gustavus Adolphus College in fall 2010. English 201, “The Art of Interpretation,” is considered the “gateway” course for the English major. Despite its somewhat artsy title, the course is intended to serve as a hard-core introduction to literary theory...
  •   Photo by Pascale Brevet Alexander Maksik, who moved to Paris in 2002 to write and teach, is the author of You Deserve Nothing, the first book from Tonga Books, Europa Editions' new imprint, edited by Alice Sebold. His writing has appeared in several journals and the anthology Strangers in Paris: New Writing from the City of Light (Tightrope, 2011). The recipient of a Truman C...
  •    July 2012
    Photos provided by John Locke   Technology’s unapologetic march toward a slimmer, sleeker, sexier experience—dominated, and prefixed with, an all-powerful i—has turned payphones into what New York architect John Locke calls “a detriment to the urban experience.” His solution involves another technology he says is on the cusp of obsolescence. John Tyler Allen:...
  • Juan Villoro (b. 1956, Mexico City) is a novelist, short-story writer, essayist, and chronicler whose work addresses an impressive array of topics with insight, dark humor, and irony: canonical Mexican literature; the Zapatista insurrection in Chiapas; the legacy of Mexico’s Cristero War; the intersections of popular television and fiction genres; and the social and cultural functions of spectato...
  •    July 2012
    Photo of Richard Mason by Michael Lionstar Richard Mason’s first novel, The Drowning People, published when he was twenty-one, sold more than a million copies worldwide and won Italy’s Grinzane Cavour Prize for Best First Novel. Born in South Africa in 1978, he is also the author of Natural Elements, which the Washington Po...
  •    May 2013
    Zvonko Karanović Like the poets of the Beat generation from whom he takes inspiration, poet and fiction writer Zvonko Karanović (b. 1959, Niš, Serbia) has traveled widely throughout Europe, hitchhiking and often changing jobs. He has worked as a journalist, editor, radio host, DJ, and concert organizer and owned a music store for thirteen years. For many years, he has been an un...
  • Kim Kyŏnguk (b. 1971, Kwang-ju, South Korea) earned his bachelor’s in English and master’s in Korean literature from Seoul National University. Since his debut story, “An Outsider,” won the Writer’s World prize for best new writer in 1993, Kim has published six story collections and five novels. One of the most prolific writers and astute observers...
  • Roberto Brodsky (b. 1957) came of age in Santiago de Chile during the revolutionary years of Salvador Allende’s Popular Unity government (1970–73). Born to Ukrainian Jewish immigrants that escaped the pogroms during the first decades of the century, Brodsky grew up immersed in leftist politics and culture. During the Popular Unity he was a young militant in the FER (Frente de Estudiantes Revoluci...
  • Clemens Setz is a young Austrian poet, novelist, magician, jazz pianist, and mathematician. His novelDie Frequenzen (Frequencies) was shortlisted in 2009 for the German Book Prize, Germany's most prestigious literary award, and his poetry and prose have also received  the Ernst-Willner-Preis (2008), the Bremer Literaturpreis (2010), and the Outstanding Artist Award (2010). Two poems by S...
  • “I make literature, not war. . . . Literature is not Jewish, Arab, or American. It tells stories to everyone.” These are the words of Boualem Sansal, an exceptionally brave and talented Algerian writer and recipient of several literary awards in France and Europe, in response to the numerous and violent reactions from his fellow citizens and Muslims around the world when he parti...
  •    May 2011
    Carsten Jensen (b. 1952) is a Danish novelist, essayist, and critic who writes for the Copenhagen daily Politiken and serves as a commentator for Danish television. Born in Marstal in 1952, he studied literature at Copenhagen University. His three fictional works include Earth in the Mouth (1994), We, the Drowned (2010), and Sidste rejse(2007; The last trip). He ha...
  • An Iraqi in Paris is Samuel Shimon’s (b. 1956) debut novel, detailing the author’s real-world journey from his home in Iraq to Paris, France. The novel was long-listed for the 2007 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Al-Hayat called it a “gem of autobiographical writing in the modern period.” In addition to his novel, Shimon edited the anthology Beirut 39 (Bloomsbury 2010), which f...