Translators | K

Browse through all of the translators in WLT.

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  • Mohammed Kadalah has most recently published translations and short prose in Lyrikline and in the anthology Voices of the Arab Spring. Born and raised in Syria, he currently teaches Arabic at the University of Connecticut.


  • Jesse Lee Kercheval’s poetry collections include Dog Angel (University of Pittsburgh Press) and World as Dictionary (Carnegie Mellon University Press). In May 2015 Editorial Yaugarú in Uruguay published her bilingual poetry collection Extranjera / Stranger. Her translations of the Uruguayan poet Circe Maia have appeared in such magazines as The New Yorker, Boston Review, and American Poetry Review. The University of Pittsburgh Press will publish Invisible Bridge / El puente invisible: Selected Poems of Circe Maia in August 2015. Kercheval is also the editor of América invertida: An Anthology of Younger Uruguayan Poets, which is forthcoming from the University of New Mexico Press. She is the Zona Gale Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin–Madison where she also directs the Program in Creative Writing


  • Sara Khalili is a financial journalist, editor, and translator of contemporary Iranian literature. She won a 2007 PEN Translation Fund Grant for her translation from the Farsi of Seasons of Purgatory, a selection of short stories by Iranian writer Shahriar Mandanipour.


  • Soo Y. Kim is Assistant Professor of English at Kookmin University, Seoul, South Korea. Kim's research and teaching areas are post–1945 British fiction, world literature, and theory. 



  • Photo by Paul Brannan

    Katie King (doolittleproject.wordpress.com) is an award-winning journalist and literary translator currently working on a PhD in Hispanic studies at the University of Washington in Seattle.


  • Neal Koga translates short stories and poetry from German, Persian, and Turkish, and works freelance as a manuscript editor. His translation of Galsan Tschinag’s “The Swan Song of a Departing People” appears in the March 2015 print edition of WLT. He also composes and publishes songs under the name Jamal.