Translators

Browse through all of the translators in WLT.

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  • Martin Aitken is a full-time translator of Scandinavian literature. His translation of Josefine Klougart’s One of Us Is Sleeping is published by Open Letter. He is currently translating the sixth book of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle from Norwegian with Don Bartlett.



  • Amanda Allard is an editorial intern at Big Sky Journal in Bozeman, Montana, where she writes about art and culture in the Northern Rockies. Amanda recently graduated from the University of Iowa with a degree in French literature. The Lover is her first work of translation to be published.  



  • Alexis Almeida grew up in Chicago. Her recent translations include Florencia Castellano’s Monitored Properties (Ugly Duckling Presse) and Roberta Iannamico’s Wreckage (Toad Press). She currently lives in Providence, Rhode Island, where she teaches writing.



  • John Angliss, winner of the British Council’s Young Translator’s Prize for prose, has also translated works by Hakan Günday and Ahmet Ümit. 



  • Brother Anthony of Taizé has published over forty volumes of translations of Korean literature and has received a number of awards. He has published ten volumes of work by Ko Un as well as recently published volumes of poetry by Jeong Ho-seung, Lee Seong-bok, and Ko Hyeong-ryeol. His Korean name is An Sonjae.



  • Tóta Árnadóttir holds an MA in Faroese language and literature from the Faroese University, where she is currently an assistant professor in oral tradition.



  • Ljubica Arsovska is editor in chief of the long-established Skopje cultural magazine Kulturen Život and a distinguished literary translator from English into Macedonian and vice versa. Her published translations include more than twenty books and plays as well as poems and collected poems by Macedonian poets published in Macedonia and abroad.



  • Pshtewan Kamal Babakir is an archivist, filmmaker, and translator at Kashkul.


  • Rachel Tzvia Back is a poet and translator residing in the Galilee. Her Ruebner collection, In the Illuminated Dark: Selected Poems of Tuvia Ruebner (Hebrew Union College Press / University of Pittsburgh Press, 2014), was a finalist in 2015 for both the National Translation Award and the National Jewish Book Award in Poetry. (Click here to read the WLT review.) Her essay “ ‘A Species of Magic’: The Role of Poetry in Protest and Truth-telling” appeared in the May 2014 issue of WLT.



  • Benjamin Balint is the translator of Hagit Grossman’s Trembling of the City (2015) and the author of Kaf ka’s Last Trial, forthcoming from Norton. He lives in Jerusalem.


  • José Bañuelos-Montes is an associate professor of Spanish at Roanoke College. He has translated Jesús J. Barquet’s El libro del desterrado (momentos robados: 1983–1991) / The Emigrant’s Logbook (Stolen Moments: 1983–1991) and is currently translating the Brazilian poet Narlan Matos.



  • Dara Barnat’s poetry, translations, and essays can be found in numerous journals. She is author of In the Absence (2016), and holds a PhD from Tel Aviv University, where she is Writing Director in the Department of English and American Studies.


  • Polina Barskova is Assistant Professor of Russian literature at Hampshire College. She published her first poems at the age of nine and has authored seven books of poetry in Russian and two in English translation to date. Her scholarly publications include articles on Nabokov, the Bakhtin brothers, early Soviet film, and historical trauma. She is currently working on a project entitled "Post-Petersburg Besieged: Aesthetics of Urban Rereading."



  • Kaveh Bassiri’s translations received a 2019 NEA fellowship and can be found in the Virginia Quarterly Review, Guernica, Colorado Review, and Massachusetts Review.



  • Curtis Bauer is a poet and a translator of poetry and prose from the Spanish. He teaches creative writing and comparative literature at Texas Tech University.



  • Kurt Beals is an assistant professor of German at Washington University in St. Louis. He has translated such authors as Anja Utler, Regina Ullmann, and Reiner Stach.



  • Susan Becker has worked as a writer, graphic designer, editor, and, for the past twenty years, as an oral historian, specializing in regional oral history, increasing accessibility of oral histories, and training oral historians. As an editor, she has worked for both academic and trade book publishers.



  • Photo by Luisa Leme

    Eric M. B. Becker is an award-winning literary translator and journalist and editor of Words Without Borders. In 2014 he earned a PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grant for his translation of a short-story collection by Mia Couto. In 2016 he earned a Fulbright fellowship to translate Brazilian literature. He holds an MFA from Queens College–City University of New York and currently lives in Brazil.


  • Julia Bloch is Assistant Professor at the Bard College MAT program in Delano, California, and an editor of the online poetics journal Jacket2. She grew up in northern California and Sydney, Australia, and received her PhD in English literature at the University of Pennsylvania. Her book Letters to Kelly Clarkson is forthcoming from Sidebrow Books; she has published poems recently in Aufgabe, P-Queue, and Peacock Online Review.


  • David Brookshaw is an emeritus professor at the University of Bristol, UK. He has published widely in the field of Brazilian and lusophone postcolonial studies. His translations include, most recently, Mia Couto’s Confession of the Lioness and Pensativities and Other Interinventions: Selected Essays, both forthcoming in spring 2015. His translation of Couto’s “In Some Other Life I Was a Bird” appears on page 53.


  • Susan Brown (b. 1968, New Orleans) is a Paris-based American translator.



  • Sarah Brownsberger’s poetry appears in Field, the Hudson Review, OnEarth, Poetry East, Salamander, and other journals. Her Icelandic-English translations include Sigfús Bjartmarsson’s bestiary, Raptorhood (Uppheimar, 2007); Harpa Árnadóttir’s artist’s diary, June (Crymogea, 2011); critical essays; and fiction and poetry for the unesco Reykjavík Literary City project.



  • During and following her studies in the international BA program in Israel, Anna Burneika assisted theater directors in Ukraine to stage new productions of Arthur Miller’s A View from the Bridge and Simon Stephens’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. She has translated more than 120 stories by Felix Krivin.



  • Photo © Carolyn Forché

    James Byrne is a poet, editor, and translator. His most recent poetry collection is Everything Broken Up Dances (Tupelo, 2015).


  • Naomi Caffee is a PhD candidate in Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is currently writing a doctoral dissertation on the literature of ethnic minorities in the former Soviet Union.


  • Paul-Henri Campbell was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1982. He studied classical Greek and Roman Catholic theology. He is a bilingual poet and translator. His publications include poetry in German and English—most recent are Space Race (2012) and Am Ende der Zeilen (2013).


  • Hélène Cardona is the author of Dreaming My Animal Selves (Salmon Poetry), The Astonished Universe (Red Hen Press), and Life in Suspension (forthcoming from Salmon Poetry in 2016). Her translations include Ce que nous portons (Éditions du Cygne), based on What We Carry, by Dorianne Laux; and Beyond Elsewhere, by Gabriel Arnou-Laujeac (forthcoming from White Pine Press in 2016). She holds a master’s in American literature from the Sorbonne, taught at Hamilton College and LMU, and received fellowships from the Goethe-Institut and Universidad Internacional de Andalucía. She co-edits Dublin Poetry Review, Levure Littéraire, and Fulcrum: An Anthology of Poetry and Aesthetics.


  • Alice-Catherine Carls is Tom Elam Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Tennessee at Martin. An internationally published diplomatic and cultural historian of twentieth-century Europe, she is also a translator and literary critic. She serves on several editorial boards and commissions in the United States and abroad.



  • Nancy Naomi Carlson has authored eight titles (five translated). An NEA grant recipient, she was a finalist for the BTBA and CLMP awards.



  • Keith Cartwright teaches at the University of North Florida and is currently the Fulbright–García Robles US Studies Chair at Universidad de las Américas Puebla. He has published two scholarly monographs and two collections of poetry. His next book—with Dolores Flores-Silva—is titled Cornbread, Quimbombó y Barbacoa: Mexico and the Gulf Shores of Our Souths.


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