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  • Shaida Tabrizi

    Shaida Tabrizi is a WLT intern.


  • Pia Tafdrup

    Pia Tafdrup (b. 1952, Copenhagen, www.tafdrup.com) is a Danish poet and writer and member of the Danish Academy and the European Academy of Poetry. Among several prizes, she received the Nordic Council's Literature Prize in 1999 and the Nordic Prize in 2006 from the Swedish Academy. Tafdrup has published fourteen collections of poetry, including Spring Tide (Forest Books, 1989), Queen's Gate (Bloodaxe, 2001), and Tarkovsky's Horses (Bloodaxe, 2010). She has also published a statement of her poetics, Walking over the Water, two plays, and two novels. Her poems are translated into more than thirty languages. English translations of her poems have been published in more than sixty literary journals in the UK, US, Canada, and Australia. She is profiled in Thousandborn: The Poet PiaTafdrup (Cosmo Film a/s).



  • Abdellah Taïa

    Abdellah Taïa (b. 1973, Rabat) is the first Moroccan and Arab writer to publicly declare his homosexuality. Editions du Seuil has published five of his books, including L’armée du salut (2006; Eng. Salvation Army, 2009), Une mélancolie arabe (2008; Eng. An Arab Melancholy, 2012), and Lettres à un jeune marocain (2009). His novel Le jour du Roi was awarded the prestigious French Prix de Flore in 2010, and his latest novel, Infidèles, came out in 2012. Taïa’s work has been translated into several languages, and he also appeared in Rémi Lange’s film The Road to Love (2001). His American publisher is Semiotext(e).



  • Lehua M. Taitano

    Lehua M. Taitano is a queer Chamoru writer and interdisciplinary artist from Yigu, Guåhan (Guam), and co-founder of the art collective Art 25: Art in the Twenty-fifth Century. Her books include Inside Me an Island, A Bell Made of Stones, and the chapbooks appalachiapacific, Sonoma, and Capacity. Taitano’s work investigates modern indigeneity, decolonization, and cultural identity in the context of diaspora.



  • Photo by Péter Peti

    Zsuzsa Takács

    Zsuzsa Takács (b. 1938) is the doyenne of contemporary Hungarian poetry (see WLT, Sept. 2015, 46­–47). She started publishing in the early 1970s. Her volumes address both private and historical traumas, the impotence of empathy and language when faced with the suffering of the creature—of a beloved person, or one’s own. She lives in Budapest.



  • Niloufar Talebi

    Past juror for the Neustadt International Prize for Literature and a WLT contributor, Niloufar Talebi (@NiloufarTalebi) is an author, award-winning translator, interdisciplinary artist, and producer. Her most recent projects are the hybrid memoir Self-Portrait in Bloom (l’Aleph, 2019) and the opera Abraham in Flames (composer, Aleksandra Vrebalov), both inspired by the life and work of the Nobel Prize–nominated Iranian poet Ahmad Shamlou.



  • Photo © Renaud Camus

    Farid Tali

    Farid Tali (b. 1977) is a French writer of Moroccan origin. In 1999 he published his first book, a collaborative journal with Renaud Camus titled Incomparable. His debut solo novella, Prosopopée, appeared in 2001 and is forthcoming in English translation from Action Books in 2016.



  • Photo by Lacey Creighton

    Jordan Tannahill

    Jordan Tannahill is a playwright, theatre director, and filmmaker. In 2014 he won a Governor General’s Award for his book Age of Minority: 3 Solo Plays and was named “Canadian Artist of the Year” by the Globe & Mail. He runs a storefront theatre in Toronto called Videofag with William Ellis.


  • Phyllis Taoua

    Phyllis Taoua is the author of Forms of Protest: Anti-Colonialism and Avant-Gardes in Africa, the Caribbean, and France (2002) and is completing her second book, Africa from African Perspectives: Their Voices, Our World and the Difference It Makes. Other publications have appeared in The Cambridge Companion to the African Novel, Transition, SubStance, Research in African Literatures, Cahier d’Études Africaines, and Journal of African Cultural Studies. In 2006 she was the recipient of a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation award and Resident Fellow at the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University.



  • Photo © Farhad Daryoush

    Goli Taraghi

    Goli Taraghi (b. 1939) is the author of I, Too, Am Che Guevara; Winter’s Sleep; Scattered Memories; Another Place; Two Worlds; and A Second Chance. Taraghi lives in France but continues to write in Persian and to publish her work in Iran.


  • Ray Taras

    Ray Taras was born and educated in Montreal and went on to study and teach at universities in the UK, Denmark, Italy, Sweden, and the US. He publishes on issues of identity and of world literature’s importance to making sense of international politics. He has been professor of political science and past director of the world literature program at Tulane University in New Orleans. In 2013–14 he is Fulbright Distinguished Chair in European Studies at the University of Warsaw. His interviews with Carsten Jensen and Rawi Hage appear, respectively, in the May 2011 and July 2013 issues of WLT.



  • Eddie Tay

    Eddie Tay is a street photographer and poet. He teaches in the Department of English, Chinese University of Hong Kong. He has written four volumes of poetry. His recent book, Anything You Can Get Away With: Creative Practices, plays with the language of poetry, street photography, and creative-writing scholarship.



  • Agustín del Moral Tejeda

    Agustín del Moral Tejeda was born in Las Choapas, Veracruz, in 1956. An accomplished writer, journalist, editor, translator, and activist, he currently lives and works in Xalapa at the University of Veracruz. He has published two novels, Nuestra alma melancólica en conserva (1997) and Cuéntame lo que me pasa (2009), as well as a work of creative nonfiction, Un Crack Mexicano: Alberto Onofre (2003). For many years he served as director of the university press of Veracruz, a key supporter of literary publication in Mexico.



  • Photo by Adriana Vichi

    Lygia Fagundes Telles

    Lygia Fagundes Telles, Brazil’s nominee for the Nobel Prize in Literature for 2016, was born in São Paulo in 1923. She is widely considered one of Brazil’s most important writers and published her first book of short stories at the age of fifteen. She was inducted into the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1985. She has won more than twenty-five national and international awards for her writing, including the Prêmio Camões, the most prestigious for Portuguese-language writers.



  • David Tenorio

    David Tenorio is a PhD candidate in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese with designated emphases in feminist research and theory and critical theory at the University of California, Davis. He is an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Public Scholar Fellow and also served as managing editor for Brújula: revista interdisciplinaria sobre estudios latinoamericanos. His research examines the representation of queer utopias in the contemporary cultural production of Cuba and Mexico.



  • Victor Terán

    Víctor Téran was born in Juchitán de Zaragoza in 1958. His work has been published extensively in magazines and anthologies throughout Mexico (see WLT, May 2009, 24–25). Since 2000, he has also appeared in anthologies such as Reversible Monuments (Copper Canyon, 2002) and Words of the True Peoples (University of Texas Press, 2005).



  • Misrak Terefe

    Misrak Terefe is a renowned poet in Ethiopia who published the first poetry VCD as a female poet. A founding member of the Tobiya Poetic Jazz Group, she has various joint publications with other writers as well as the Tobiya poetry and jazz DVD (vol. 1) release.



  • Photo by Dragan Radovancevic

    ko ko thett

    ko ko thett is a poet by choice and a Burmese by chance. In between he is a poetry translator, editor, and anthologist of contemporary Burmese poetry (see WLT, January 2012, 35–41). His first anthology, Bones Will Crow: Fifteen Contemporary Burmese Poets, was published in the US by Northern Illinois University Press. He lives in Vienna and writes in both Burmese and English.



  • Dominic Thomas

    Dominic Thomas is Madeleine L. Letessier Professor and chair of the Department of French and Francophone Studies at UCLA. He is the author or co-author of numerous books, including Black France (2007), Africa and France (2013), Colonial Culture in France since the Revolution (2014), The Invention of Race (2014), and Vers la guerre des identités (2016). He is the editor of the Global African Voices series at Indiana University Press.



  • Photo: Peter Dressel

    Samantha Thornhill

    Samantha Thornhill is a poet, educator, and author of three children’s books. A performer on stages across the US and internationally, she holds an MFA from the University of Virginia and taught poetry for a decade at the Juilliard School. Her newest children’s book, A Card for My Father, was published this year with Penny Candy Books.


  • Sophie L. Thunberg

    Sophie L. Thunberg is a book department intern in the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in New York.


  • Spencer Thurlow

    Spencer Thurlow is the current Poet Laureate of West Tisbury, Massachusetts. His poetry or translations have appeared in Modern Poetry in Translation, World Literature Today, Cincinnati Review, Comstock Review, Worcester Review, and others. He is co-translator of Sonic Peace, by Kiriu Minashita.



  • Sergej Timofejev

    Sergej Timofejev is a member of Orbita, a creative collective of Russian poets and artists, as well as a Riga-based journalist, translator, and DJ. Since the late 1980s, he has published in the journals Rodnik, Mitin zhurnal, Vavilon, Znamia, and others. A pioneer of video poetry in Russian, his first video poem, "Orchestra Rehearsal" (1995), may be seen on YouTube. Timofejev is the author of six books of poetry, three of which were published in Latvia and three in Russia. He was short-listed for the Andrei Belyi prize in 2002. His poetry has been translated into several languages.


  • Julia Tindell

    Julia Tindell is a junior English major at Gustavus Adolphus College. When she graduates, she hopes to obtain a PhD in English and become a college professor. She currently works as a tutor in the Writing Center at Gustavus and plans to study abroad next fall at Oxford University.



  • Erkut Tokman

    Erkut Tokman (b. 1971, Istanbul) is a Turkish poet, translator, interviewer, and editor of the Yasakmeyve literary review. He is a member of the Turkish and Italian PEN centers, works for the Writers in Prisons Committee, and serves as a foreign relations representative and board member of Intercultural Poetry and the Translation Academy of Turkey.


  • Raúl Tola

    Raúl Tola is a Peruvian journalist and fiction writer who lives between Lima and Madrid. His novel Flores amarillas (2013) was reviewed in the November 2014 issue of WLT.



  • Natalia Toledo

    Natalia Toledo has written four books of poetry and two of prose, all bilingual (Zapotec/Spanish). She has read her poetry in Latin America and the United States as well as Europe and Asia. Her work as a jewelry and clothing designer and chef reiterates the lively imagery of her poetry.



  • Svetlana Tomić

    Svetlana Tomić is an associate professor in the Faculty of Foreign Languages at Alfa BK University, Serbia. She has authored five scholarly monographs, edited six books, and published two books of poems. For her first poetry book she received the Serbian Literary Youth Organization publication award for a manuscript. Her main research interests are in the institutionalized public knowledge of nineteenth-century Serbian literature, research methodologies in closed societies, hidden history, women’s writings, the formation of a women’s elite in the Balkans, and post-Yugoslav literature.



  • Martín Tonalmeyotl

    Martín [Jacinto Meza] Tonalmeyotl is a Nahua poet, fiction writer, teacher, translator, radio host, and columnist who has dedicated his career to the anthologization, destigmatization, and greater circulation of underrepresented languages native to Mexico and, more recently, the greater Americas. A trained linguist, his master’s thesis was the first to formally document the morphology and phonology of Atzacoaloya Náhuatl, the variant in which he writes; he has been a professor at various universities in Mexico, at work training a new generation of speakers. He is on the editorial board of Nueva York Poetry Review Press, where he oversees the publication of texts written in indigenous languages. Additionally, he is editor of the series Xochitlájtoli (Círculo de Poesía), a regular column of contemporary poetry written in Mexico’s indigenous languages, and Brasiliana, a series dedicated to those of Latin America more broadly appearing trilingually in the original, Spanish, and Portuguese (Philos). He is compiler of the anthology Xochitlajtoli: Poesía contemporánea en lenguas originarias de México (Círculo de Poesía, 2019), the first to be selected and edited by a member of an indigenous community rather than a scholar from the outside, and the first to include the authors’ own unmediated translations into Spanish. An enormous undertaking including thirty-one authors in sixteen languages, Xochitlajtoli is one of the most significant recent scholarly achievements in hemispheric American poetry. Tonalmeyotl has also compiled an anthology of all female-identified poets writing in Náhuatl as well as a several-hundred-page long, three-volume historical survey of Nahuatl writing. His bilingual collections, which present self-translations from regional Atzacoaloya Náhuatl into Spanish en face alongside the original, include Tlalkatsajtsilistle / Ritual de los olvidados (Jaguar Ediciones, Universidad Intercultural del Estado de Puebla, 2016), Nosentlalilxochitlajtol / Antología personal (Asociación de Escritores de México, Colección Colores Primarios, 2017), and Istitsin ueyeatsintle / Uña mar (Cisnegro, 2019).



  • Khal Torabully

    Khal Torabully, from Mauritius, is a prizewinning poet, essayist, film director, and semiologist. Author of some twenty-five books, he coined the term “coolitude” to give voice to indentured workers, imbuing the term with dignity and pride. Torabully’s linguistic acrobatics (wordplay and neologisms) serve to heighten the seriousness of his themes.


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