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  • Natalka Babina (b. 1966) is a Belarusian journalist and writer.


  • Pier Luigi Bacchini (b. 1927) is from Parma (Emilia), where he lived until 1993, retiring to the countryside near Medesano not far from the city. His poetry collections include Dal silenzio d'un nulla (1954), Canti familiari (1968), Distanze, fioriture (1981), Visi e foglie (1993), Scritture vegetali (1999), Contemplazioni meccaniche e pneumatiche (2005), and Canti territoriali (2009). "Chiacchiere," the poem translated here, is from Scritture vegetali.



  • Photo by Stéphane Chaumet

    Poet and translator Rachel Tzvia Back lives in the Galilee, where her great-great-great-grandfather settled in the 1830s. Her poetry collections include A Messenger Comes (elegies), On Ruins & Return, Azimuth, and the forthcoming collection entitled What Use Is Poetry, the Poet Is Asking. Her most recent translation project, On the Surface of Silence: The Last Poems of Lea Goldberg, will be published in spring 2017.



  • Shakeel Badayuni (1916–70) was a successful and prolific Bollywood songwriter as well as a renowned author of Urdu ghazals. Born in Uttar Pradesh, India, his father taught him Arabic, Urdu, Farsi, and Hindi. He attended Aligarh University in the 1930s, then a center of political and poetical ferment. He quickly became a leading figure in Bollywood with the success of the first film he wrote lyrics for, Dard. Shakeel wrote lyrics for eighty-nine films.





  • Photo © Kael Alford

    Anna Badkhen has spent most of her life in the Global South. Her immersive investigations of the world’s iniquities have yielded six books of nonfiction, most recently Fisherman’s Blues (2018). She has written about wars on three continents and is a 2017–2018 writer-in-residency at the Tulsa Artist Fellowship, where she is at work on her first novel. In 2018 she was awarded the Barry Lopez Visiting Writer in Ethics and Community Fellowship.



  • Mirza Athar Baig is a Pakistani novelist, playwright, and short-story writer. His works include the novel Ghulam Bagh (The garden of slaves), considered one of the most important novels of Urdu literature. He lives in Lahore and teaches philosophy at Government College University.


  • Julene Bair is an American author.



  • Photo: Edin Tuzlak

    Asja Bakić (b. 1982) is a Bosnian poet, writer, and translator. Her second book, a collection of short stories entitled Mars (2015), was shortlisted for the Edo Budiša Award. She currently lives and works in Zagreb, Croatia.



  • Natalie Bakopoulos is an American author teaching at the University of Michigan.



  • Photo by Gáspár Stekovics.

    Zsófia Bán was born in 1957 in Rio de Janeiro. She is a writer, critic, and scholar. “A két Frida” (“The Two Fridas”) was published in Bán’s short-story collection Esti iskola: Olvasókönyv felnotteknek (2007; Evening school: A reader for adults), her first work of fiction, for which she was awarded the Attila József Prize. She has been a prolific writer of essays and reviews on literature, art, and visual culture. Her essay collections include Próbacsomagolás (2008; Test-packing) and Amerikaner (2000). She teaches at the Department of American Studies at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest. She was a participant at the 2009 PEN World Voices Festival, representing Hungary.


  • Neelanjana Banerjee is a writer and editor whose poetry and fiction have appeared in the Literary Review, Asian Pacific American Journal, Nimrod, A Room of One’s Own, Desilit, and the anthology Desilicious. She received an MFA in Creative Writing from San Francisco State University in 2007 and was a Hedgebrook Fellow in 2008. She has worked in mainstream, ethnic, and independent media for the past ten years and has helped young people tell their stories at YO! Youth Outlook Multimedia and the San Francisco WritersCorps. She is a co-editor of Indivisible (University of Arkansas Press, 2010), the first anthology of South Asian American poetry.


  • Kaitlin Bankston is an English literary and cultural studies major at the University of Oklahoma who studied Handal’s work and met her in September 2011 during the Neustadt Festival of International Literature and Culture.



  • Photo by Steve Fisch

    Ibtisam Barakat is a Palestinian American author, poet, artist, and educator working in both Arabic and English. Her memoir, Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood, about growing up in Palestine, won many awards including “Best Book” from the International Reading Association. Her book Al Ta’ Al Marbouta Tateer won the Anna Lindh Foundation “Read Here, There, and Everywhere” best Arabic book for young readers prize.



  • Salim Barakat is a Kurdish-Syrian poet and novelist. He was born in 1951 in Qamishli, an ethnically, religiously, and linguistically diverse city in northern Syria. He moved to Damascus in the early 1970s and then on to Beirut. In 1982 the escalating political and sectarian tensions in the war-torn city forced him to leave for Cyprus, where he remained over fifteen years. He has been residing in Stockholm, Sweden, since 1999. He has published over forty-six works of poetry and prose, including three autobiographies.


  • Alessandro Baricco (b. 1958) is an Italian writer, director and performer. His work has been published in various languages.


  • Dara Barnat’s poetry, translations, and essays can be found in numerous journals. She is author of In the Absence (2016). Dara holds a PhD from Tel Aviv University, where she is writing director in the Department of English and American Studies.



  • Photo by Ellen Warner

    Julian Patrick Barnes (born 19 January 1946) is a contemporary English writer. Barnes won the Man Booker Prize for his book The Sense of an Ending (2011), and three of his earlier books had been shortlisted for the Booker Prize: Flaubert's Parrot (1984), England, England (1998), and Arthur & George (2005). He has also written crime fiction under the pseudonym Dan Kavanagh (his late wife's surname), though has published nothing under that name for more than twenty-five years. In addition to novels, Barnes has published collections of essays and short stories.



  • Miguel Barnet (b. Cuba, 1940) is a novelist, poet, and ethnographer whose works have influenced the development of testimonio, or testimonial narrative. He visited the University of Oklahoma in 2002—along with Adelaida de Juan, Pablo Armando Fernández, Ambrosio Fornet, Nancy Morejón, and Elzbieta Sklodowska—to help celebrate the life and work of the 2002 Puterbaugh Fellow, Roberto Fernández Retamar (WLT, 76:3-4, Summer/Autumn 2002).

     


  • Jesús J. Barquet (b. 1953, Havana) has published nine books of poetry: from Sin decir el mar (1981) to Los viajes venturosos / Venturous Journeys (2015). He is an award-winning literary critic and anthologist whose most recent work is Todo parecía: poesía cubana contemporánea de temas gays y lésbicos (2015). He has lived in the United States since 1980.


  • A. Igoni Barrett (b. 1979) is a Nigerian writer.



  • Photo: Merleyn Bell

    Reid Bartholomew is a WLT intern studying writing and Japanese at the University of Oklahoma. When he isn’t writing, he finds himself catching up on his mile-long reading list or working with the staff of The Aster Review, a student arts publication at OU. He hopes to have ideas important enough to write novels about one day.



  • Photo by Medija Centar Beograd

    Svetislav Basara (b. 1953) is a contemporary Serbian author of more than twenty literary works. He writes novels, story collections, and essays, and is the recipient of several Serbian literary awards.



  • Photo by Susan Seubert

    Samiya Bashir’s work has recently appeared in Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia F–K (vol. 2). Her most recent book of poems, Gospel, was a finalist for both the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and, along with her first collection, Where the Apple Falls, the Lambda Literary Award.



  • Photo by Antonio Reyes

    Aicha Bassry was born in Ben Ahmad, Morocco in 1969. Her publications include massā’āt (2000; Evenings); araqu al-malā’ikah (2003; Angels’ insomnia); laylah sari`atu al `atab (2007; A fragile night); and khulwatu al tayr (2010; The bird’s seclusion), from which the present extracts are taken. Her poems have also been translated into Spanish, French, Turkish, and Italian.


  • Grace Bauer is a prize-winning American poet.



  • Photo: Ekko Von Schwichow

    Andreas Baum (b. 1967) grew up in Nairobi and Hesse, Germany. He studied journalism and Latin American studies in Berlin and has written as a journalist for well-known German newspapers. Since 2013 he is the culture editor and an author at Deutschlandradio Kultur. Wir waren die neue Zeit (We were the new era) is his first novel.

     



  • Jason Bayani is the author of Amulet (Write Bloody Publishing, 2013). He’s an MFA graduate from Saint Mary’s College, a Kundiman Fellow, and works as the artistic director for Kearny Street Workshop. Jason performs regularly around the country and recently debuted his solo theater show, Locus of Control, in 2016.



  • Askold Bazhanov is a Skolt Saami poet writing in the Russian language. He was born in 1934 in the village of Notozero, Murmansk district, Russia. After the Second World War he relocated to Leningrad to study in the Department of the Peoples of the North, a special sector for ethnic minorities created under the auspices of Gertsen State Pedagogical University. Upon returning home to the historically Saami lands near Lovozero township, he began writing poetry while working in various occupations: as a miner, a railroad technician, a tractor operator, and a reindeer herder. His best-known publications include Solntse nad tundroi (Sun over the tundra, 1983) and Belyi Olen’ (The white reindeer, 1996). The main themes of his poetry include the struggle to preserve indigenous cultural identity in the face of encroaching modernity; surviving the hardships of collectivization, war, and economic exploitation; and the intimate, spiritual connections between humans and the natural world. His work has been translated into English and various dialects of Saami.



  • Jan Beatty’s fifth book, Jackknife: New and Selected Poems (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017), won the 2018 Paterson Prize. The Huffington Post called her one of ten “advanced women poets for required reading.” She worked as an abortion counselor, in maximum-security prisons, and directs the creative writing program at Carlow University.


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