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  • Photo by Shevaun Williams

    Dubravka Ugrešić is a European writer, author of several novels and volumes of essays that have been translated into over twenty languages. Recipient of several prestigious literary awards, including the 2016 Neustadt International Prize for Literature, Ugrešić was born and raised in the former Yugoslavia, then in Croatia, and now lives in the Netherlands.



  • Photo © Ekaterina Bogdanova

    Amarsana Ulzytuev (b. 1963), an alumnus of the Gorky Literature Institute, is from the Buryatia capital of Ulan-Ude, one hundred miles southeast of Lake Baikal. Just off the presses is his third book, Anaphora. His first two are Morning Forever (2002) and Abovenew (2009, with an afterword by Alexander Eremenko), and a fourth is forthcoming from Vremya. Two of Alex Cigale’s translations of his other poems appeared in the May 2014 issue of WLT.



  • Sandee Gertz Umbach is a poet/writer from western Pennsylvania, now living in Nashville. She is the author of The Pattern Maker’s Daughter (Bottom Dog, 2012) and is completing her memoir, Some Girls Have Auras of Bright Colors. She is a PA Council on the Arts fellow, a winner of the Sandburg-Livesay Award, and her poetry collection earned second place in the Working Class Studies Tillie Olsen award competition. She has an MFA from Wilkes University. 



  • Giuseppe Ungaretti (1888-1970) was born in Alexandria, Egypt into an Italian family, where he was educated in French and began working as a journalist and literary critic. Ungaretti moved to Paris in 1912, but enlisted in the infantry in World War I and fought in the trenches in Northern Italy. World War I served as the catalyst for Ungaretti's venture into poetry, and he published his first collection of poetry in 1916. Among his many affiliations, Ungaretti's works were influenced by Dadaism, Hermeticism (of which he helped to revoluntionize in the 1930s), Symbolism, and Futurism, among others. Ungaretti is the first laureate of the Neustadt Prize, he won the prestigious literary prize in 1970.



  • Photo by Daniel Pickett

    Samrat Upadhyay is the author of Arresting God in Kathmandu, a Whiting Award winner; The Royal Ghosts, which won the Asian American Literary Award; The Guru of Love, a New York Times Notable Book and a San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of the Year; and Buddha’s Orphans, a novel. He has written for the New York Times and has appeared on BBC Radio and National Public Radio. Upadhyay teaches in the creative writing program at Indiana University. He is currently working on a new novel titled Mask and a collection of stories called Freak Street, a real street in Kathmandu where the hippies used to hang out in the 1960s.



  • Lee Upton’s sixth book of poetry, Bottle the Bottles the Bottles the Bottles, appeared from the Cleveland State University Poetry Center in 2015. Her collection of short stories, The Tao of Humiliation (BOA Editions), was named one of the best books of 2014 by Kirkus Reviews.