Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Jennifer Doyle is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside, where she teaches gender studies, visual culture, and American literature. She is the author of Sex Objects: Art and the Dialectics of Desire (2006) and Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art (forthcoming from Duke University Press). She writes a feminist soccer blog, From a Left Wing (fromaleftwing.blogspot.com), and is working on a book about art and sport, tentatively titled The Athletic Gesture.



  • Photo by Chris Boland

    Margaret Drabble (b. 1939) is an English novelist, biographer, and critic. She has published 17 novels, and in 2011, she was awarded the Golden PEN Award.



  • Nataša Dragnić (b. 1965) is a Croatian writer and poet. She currently lives in Germany where she works as a foreign language instructor.


  • Žydrūnas Drungilas did his graduate studies at Klaipeda University in Lithuania and the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is currently editor of the weekly cultural journal Šiaurės Atėnai in Vilnius, Lithuania. Between rare but memorable visits to literary salons, he has been seen wandering the streets of Vilnius in a state best described as inscrutable.



  • Zoran Drvenkar (b. 1967) is a Croatian German novelist. His novel Sorry won the Friedrich-Glauser Prize in 2010.



  • Carolyn M. Dunn is an associate vice provost of Institutional Diversity and Inclusion and associate professor of English at Central Michigan University, co-editor of The Journal of Louisiana Creole Studies, and part of the NAMMY award-winning all-women’s drum group The Mankillers. Her poetry books include Outfoxing Coyote (2002), Echolocation: Poems Indian Country, LA (2014), and Stains of Burden and Dumb Luck (forthcoming). She is also the author of the much lauded play, The Frybread Queen



  • Duo Duo 多多 (b. 1951) is the pen name of Li Shizheng, who was born in Beijing in 1951. He started writing poetry in the early 1970s as a youth during the isolated, midnight hours of the Cultural Revolution, and many of his early poems critiqued the Cultural Revolution from an insider's point of view in a highly sophisticated, original style. Often considered part of the "Misty" school of contemporary Chinese poetry, he nevertheless kept a cautious distance from any literary trends or labeling.

    After witnessing the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, Duo Duo left China and did not return for more than a decade. Upon his return to China in 2004, the literary community received him with honor and praise. Duo Duo currently teaches at Hainan University and divides his time between Hainan and Beijing. His translations into English include the verse collections Looking Out from Death: From the Cultural Revolution to Tiananmen Square (1989) and The Boy Who Catches Wasps (2002) as well as Snow Plain (2010), a recent collection of short stories. Duo Duo is the twenty-first laureate of the Neustadt Prize and the first Chinese recipient of the award.

    Read Duo Duo's 2010 Neustadt Prize acceptance speech and three of his poems in bilingual texts.



  • Lucy Durneen (lucydurneen.co.uklectures in English and creative writing at Plymouth University, UK, and is assistant editor of Short Fiction. She has published stories in various literary journals, been shortlisted for the Bridport Prize and highly commended in the Manchester Fiction Prize, and recently completed her first collection of short stories.



  • Geoff Dyer (b. 1958) is an English writer and a journalist. Some awards he has receive include the E.M. Forster Award in 2006 and the GQ Writer of the Year Award in 2009.



  • Russian American writer Anastasia Edel has written a novel, Past Perfect,a collection of literary essays, a short-story collection, and a nonfiction book, Russia: Putin’s Playground. She holds an MFA from Pacific University and lives in the Bay Area with her family.



  • Photo: Sigtryggur Ari Johannsson

    Oddný Eir (b. 1972) is an Icelandic author whose novel Land of Love and Ruinswon the EU Prize for Literature and the Icelandic Women’s Literature Prize. She has published four novels and several books of poetry and essays and has received advanced degrees in political philosophy from the University of Iceland and the Sorbonne.



  • Eli Eliahu (b. 1969) is an Israeli poet based out of Ramat Gan. He has published two highly praised books in Hebrew, I, and Not an Angel (2008) and City and Fears (2011). He is the recipient of the 2014 Levi Eshkol Prime Minister’s Poetry Prize. Aside from writing poetry, he writes for Haaretz on poetry and culture. Most of his work has not been translated into English.



  • Eric Ellingsen uses bio-spaces to squat bio-poems.
    This morning I couldn’t get my bio lines to read rite, so I took a bit out
    of the hand drill and inserted all my two-year-old’s red crayons
    drawing the red line. Then I went upstairs and read, instead
    of “state,” let us all be heads of lettuce, drawing on Khlebnikov.
    Whatever you throw into the eternal circumstance, have a good time.



  • Born in Iran, Mohsen Emadi is the award-winning author of four verse collections and numerous poetry translations; the poems featured in the print edition of the January issue come from a collection called “Standing on Earth.” Emadi is the founder and manager of Ahmad Shamlou’s official website and The House of World Poets, a Persian anthology featuring more than five hundred international writers. He currently lives in Mexico City.



  • Poet Heid E. Erdrich (Ojibwe enrolled at Turtle Mountain) is author of seven books including Curator of Ephemera at the New Museum for Archaic Media (2017). She also makes poem films with fellow Ojibwe and indigenous artists. Heid teaches in the low-res MFA program at Augsburg College.


  • George Evans is the author of five books of poetry published in the United States and England, including The New World (2002) and Sudden Dreams (1995). His poetry, fiction, essays, and translations have been published in literary magazines throughout the U.S. and in Australia, England, France, Ireland, Japan, Nicaragua, and Viet Nam. His honors include writing fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lannan Foundation, the California Arts Council, and a Japanese government Monbusho Fellowship for the study of Japanese literature. He has also co-translated The Violent Foam: New and Selected Poems (2002), by his wife, Nicaraguan poet Daisy Zamora; The Time Tree (2003), poems by Vietnamese poet Huu Thinh; and edited the two-volume correspondence of Charles Olson and Cid Corman. An antiwar activist veteran of the Viet Nam War, he is one of the subjects of the recent radio series Shared Weight, a six-episode program addressing the impact of war on culture and society, produced for National Public Radio (NPR) by the Center for Emerging Media at WYPR in Baltimore.



  • Brian Evenson is the author of over a dozen books of fiction, most recently the story collection A Collapse of Horses. His translations from the French include books by David B., Christian Gailly, Jean Frémon, Jacques Jouet, and others. He teaches in the Critical Studies program at CalArts.



  • Born in Baku in 1976, Elnaz Eyvaz is a secondary school literature teacher and works for the Azerbaijan State Television and Radio Company. She has published two books of poetry (It Is Good That I Can Write and A Man’s Confession) and was a nominee for the 2011 Nasimi Prize for Literature.



  • Brian Fanelli’s poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in a number of magazines and journals, most recently Oklahoma Review, Spillway, Boston Literary Magazine, Portland Review, and Third Wednesday. Fanelli is the author of one chapbook, Front Man (Big Table Publishing), and the full-length collection All That Remains, forthcoming soon from Unbound Content. Prior to working as a full-time English instructor at Lackawanna College, Fanelli worked a number of jobs, including country clerk, factory worker, and adjunct instructor. He has an MFA from Wilkes University and is currently a PhD student at SUNY Binghamton.


  • A child prodigy in China, Liu Fang is recognized as one of the most eminent pipa soloists as well as a sensitive performer on the guzheng. She has collaborated with world-class musicians from various traditions and has released eleven solo and collaborative albums. She now lives in Canada.



  • Nuruddin Farah (b. 1945) was born in the Italian-ruled southern region of Somalia, Baidoa. His mother was a traditional storyteller, and his father was a merchant who later worked for the British government as an interpreter. Farah lived in a multilingual environment and learned to speak Somali, Amharic, English, Italian, and Arabic. When he began to write, Farah chose English as the language of his works. His first novel, From A Crooked Rib (1970), depicts the authoritarian role of patriarchy in African society and earned Farah praise as a "male feminist." The publication of his second novel, A Naked Needle (1976), angered the Somalian dictatorial regime and finally forced Farah into exile after receiving death threats. Farah would not return to live in Somalia again, but his lifelong pursuit is to keep his country through his writing.



  • Photo © www.mahmag.org

    Forugh Farrokhzad (1935–1967) was an Iranian poet and filmmaker. Her published works include The Captive, The Wall, Rebellion, Reborn, and Let Us Believe in the Dawn of the Cold Season. She broke with many traditional conventions and thus exercised an immeasurably important influence on modern Iranian poetry.



  • Feyziyye was born in 1982. She works as a newspaper journalist in Baku. She has published one book of poetry, Message. Her poetry takes up themes of war and displacement.



  • Photo by Radek Kobietski

    Julia Fiedorczuk (b. 1975) is a Polish poet, prose writer, translator, and lecturer in American literature at the University of Warsaw. She has published five books of poetry, a collection of short stories, and two novels. Her Pushcart-nominated poem “Lands and Oceans” appeared in the November 2014 issue of WLT. Her most recent book, Nieważkość, was nominated for the Nike Prize. Oxygen, a volume of selected poetry translated by Bill Johnston, is forthcoming from Zephyr Press in 2017.



  • Elizabeth Fifer is professor of English at Lehigh University, where she teaches contemporary world and American literature. She is currently writing about the use of repetition in The Patrick Melrose Novels, by Edward St. Aubyn.


  • Nancy Finn teaches dramatic literature and Irish studies in the English Department at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and theater studies in the Performing Arts Department at Emerson College. She received her PhD in theater from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her research interests include modern and contemporary Irish theater and drama, contemporary women playwrights, and theater historiography. She is also an actor and dramaturge. She is currently writing a monograph on the work of Marina Carr. 


  • A native of Naples, Peppe Fiore lives and works in Rome. In addition to Nessuno è indispensabile, he is the author of two short-story collections and a second novel, La futura classe dirigente (The future ruling class). His interest in writing about the world of work, he says, is tied to the way “working life becomes a useful framework for understanding how we function as a species.”



  • Will Firth (www.willfirth.de) was born in 1965 in Newcastle, Australia. He studied German and Slavic languages in Canberra, Zagreb, and Moscow. Since 1991 he has lived in Berlin, where he works as a translator of literature and the humanities (from Russian, Macedonian, and all variants of Serbo-Croat). His best-received translations of recent years have been Robert Perišić‘s Our Man in Iraq, Andrej Nikolaidis’s Till Kingdom Come, and Faruk Šehić’s Quiet Flows the Una



  • Slovene author Leonora Flis wrote Upogib Časa (Bending time), a book of essays about living in New York City as a foreigner after spending a Fulbright year in the city studying at Columbia. She teaches narrative nonfiction in Ljubljana and Nova Gorica.

     



  • Dolores Flores-Silva, from the Mexican Gulf state of Veracruz, teaches Latin American literature and culture at Roanoke College. She is co-author of The Cross and the Sword in the Works of Rosario Ferré and Mayra Montero (2009) and has written on topics such as Mexican and Hispano-Caribbean literatures and cultures, Chicano Studies, and—most recently—the US South. Her publications as a poet, playwright, and translator traverse languages and borders.


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