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  • Dean Chavers is director of Catching the Dream, former president of Bacone College, and initiated the Exemplary Programs in Indian Education (EPIE) movement. He has written over twenty books. In his capacity as director of Catching the Dream, Dr. Chavers has helped more than six hundred Native American students finish college.


  • A Zimbabwean writer, Brian Chikwava is the author of the novel Harare North and winner of the 2004 Caine Prize for African Writing for his story "Seventh Street Alchemy." His essay "Free Speech in Zimbabwe: The Story of the Blue-Stomached Lizard" appeared in the September 2006 issue of WLT.



  • Photo: Fabien Castro

    Mexican writer Alberto Chimal (b. 1970) is the author of the short-story collections Los atacantes, Grey, and Manda fuego (Colima Prize, 2014) and the novel La torre y el jardín (Rómulo Gallegos Prize shortlist, 2013). His most recent book is the children’s story La Distante (Cuatrogatos Foundation Award, 2019). He has a YouTube channel about books and creative writing.



  • Frank Chin was born in Berkeley, California, He attended college at the University of California, Berkeley. He received an American Book Award in 1989 for a collection of short stories, The Chinaman Pacific and Frisco R.R. Co., and another in 2000 for Lifetime Achievement. He currently resides in Los Angeles.
    Chin is considered to be one of the pioneers in Asian American theatre. He founded the Asian American Theatre Workshop, which became the Asian American Theater Company in 1973. He first gained notoriety as a playwright in the 1970s. His play The Chickencoop Chinaman was the first by an Asian American to be produced on a major New York stage. Stereotypes of Asian Americans, and traditional Chinese folklore are common themes in much of his work.
    In addition to his work as an author and playwright, Frank Chin has also worked extensively with Japanese American resisters of the draft in WWII. His novel, Born in the U.S.A., is dedicated to this subject.

    Chin is also a musician. In the mid-1960s, he taught Robbie Krieger, a member of The Doors how to play the Flamenco guitar.



  • Necia Chronister is an associate professor of German at Kansas State University and the editor of Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature. Her research focuses on contemporary German literature, primarily by women writers. She has published on Jenny Erpenbeck, Judith Hermann, Angela Krauss, and Antje Rávic Strubel.



  • Eddie Chuculate (Creek/Cherokee) is the author of the story collection Cheyenne Madonna (Black Sparrow Press, 2010) and a winner of the O. Henry Prize. He held a Wallace Stegner creative writing fellowship at Stanford University and graduated from the Institute of American Indian Arts. He later earned a master’s of fine arts degree at the University of Iowa’s Writers’ Workshop.



  • Eun-Gwi Chung is an associate professor at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, Korea. She earned her PhD in the Poetics Program at SUNY Buffalo. Her translations of Korean poetry with Brother Anthony have been published as The Colors of Dawn: Twentieth-Century Korean Poetry (2014) and Fifteen Seconds Without Sorrow (2014) in the US. This research was supported by a research grant from Hankuk University of Foreign Studies.



  • Sonya Chyu studied fiction at Cornell University. Her work has been awarded first place in the Arthur Lynn Andrews Prize in Fiction, published in Rainy Day and Anak Sastra, and received Honorable Mention in Glimmer Train’s Short Story Award for New Writers.


  • Kayla Ciardi grew up in Norman, Oklahoma, and recently graduated summa cum laude from the University of Oklahoma, earning a bachelor’s degree in English. She currently interns for World Literature Today and has been accepted to the Columbia Publishing Course at Oxford for fall 2019. With interests in writing, editing, and visual design as well as a lifelong love of literature, Kayla plans to pursue a career in publishing.



  • Photo © Astrid Purkert

    Janet Clark worked as a university lecturer and head of marketing in Belgium, England, and Germany. After a successful career in the industry, she started over from scratch as a writer. Since 2011, she has had nine novels published and campaigns for authors’ rights as the president of Mörderische Schwestern e.V.



  • Harry Clifton (born 1952) is an Irish poet. He was born in Dublin, but has lived in Africa and Asia, as well as more recently in continental Europe. He has published five collections of poems in Ireland and the United Kingdom, including The Liberal Cage (1988) and The Desert Route: Selected Poems 1973–1988 (1992).



  • Jessica Cohen translates contemporary Israeli prose and poetry. Her translations include David Grossman’s critically acclaimed To the End of the Land and works by Amir Gutfreund, Yael Hedaya, Etgar Keret, Ronit Matalon, and Tom Segev.


  • Isabel Fargo Cole’s other translations include The Sleep of the Righteous, by Wolfgang Hilbig (Two Lines Press); The Jew Car, by Franz Fühmann; Collected Essays, by Friedrich Dürrenmatt; and “I, by Wolfgang Hilbig (all with Seagull Books). She also edits the online translation journal no man’s land


  • Paula Conlon teaches graduate and undergraduate Native American and world music classes at the University of Oklahoma along with experiential seminars on Native American music and dance. 



  • Photo by Annette Hornischer

    Peter Constantine’s recent translations include The Essential Writings of Rousseau, The Essential Writings of Machiavelli, and works by Chekhov, Tolstoy, Gogol, and Voltaire. A Guggenheim Fellow, he was awarded the PEN Translation Prize for Six Early Stories, by Thomas Mann, and the National Translation Award for The Undiscovered Chekhov. He is the director of the Program in Literary Translation at the University of Connecticut.



  • Michael Cope (b. 1952) is a jeweler, writer, and karate teacher living in Cape Town, South Africa. He is married to Julia Martin and has three children. He has published three novels, two volumes of poems, and a memoir.


  • Rachel Cordasco has a PhD in literary studies and currently works as a developmental editor. She also writes reviews for publications like World Literature Today and Strange Horizons and translates Italian speculative fiction. For all things related to speculative fiction in translation, check out her website: sfintranslation.com.


  • Author of five books of fiction, Moira Crone’s works have appeared in dozens of anthologies, magazines, and journals. Her most recent work is the dystopian novel The Not Yet (2012).



  • Luis Alberto de Cuenca (b. 1950, Madrid) is perhaps the one Spanish poet today who has influenced most of the younger generations of poets. He recently received the National Poetry Award for his latest book of poetry, Cuaderno de vacaciones (Visor, 2014). His poetry combines urban reality, pop culture, and classical antiquity while maintaining his own identity through irony, elegance, and a tone of lightheartedness.


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