Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • C. P. Cavafy (b. 1863, d. 1933) was a Greek poet who worked in Alexandria as a journalist and a civil servant.


  • Patrizia Cavalli (b. 1952) was born in Todi (Umbria) and now lives in Rome. Her first three volumes, Le mie poesie non cambieranno il mondo (1974), Il cielo (1981), and L'io singolare proprio mio (1992), are collected in Poesie (1974–92) (1992), and were followed by Sempre aperto teatro (1999) and Pigre divinità e pigra sorte (2006). She has also translated plays by Molière and Shakespeare. "La giornata atlantica," the poem translated here, is from her third collection.


  • Ermanno Cavazzoni (b. 1947), from Reggio Emilia, is the award-winning author of many fantastic and absurd tales. Of his many books, including Vite brevi di idioti, Cirenaica, Gli scrittori inutili, Storia naturale dei giganti, and Il limbo delle fantasticazioni, two novels have been published in English translation: The Nocturnal Library (Vagabond Voices, 2010) and Voice of the Moon (Serpent's Tail, 1990). He is also a professor at the University of Bologna and a member of the literary group OpLePo (www.oplepo.it). 


  • A student of literature and anthropology, Italian actor, director, and author Ascanio Celestini (b. 1972) is keenly interested in the commedia dell’arte and runs a number of workshops. Since his first play Cicoria (1998), centered on Pasolini, he has performed numerous monologues based on testimonies and encounters. His film La pecora nera (2010) was an official selection at the 67th Venice International Film Festival, and his latest story collection is titled Io cammino in fila indiana (Einaudi, 2011).


  • Lorna Dee Cervantes (b. 1954) is a Chicana, Native American, feminist, activist poet. Her most notable achievements include the American Book Award, the NEA Fellowship, and the Pushcart Prize.


  • Michael Chabon is a bestselling and Pulitzer Prize-winning author. He is known for writing The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, A Model World, Wonder Boys, and Werewolves in Their Youth, among others. He currently lives in Berkeley, California, with his wife and children.



  • Chamoiseau was born on December 3, 1953 in Fort-de-France, Martinique, where he currently resides. After he studied law in Paris he returned to Martinique inspired by Édouard Glissant to take a close interest in Creole culture.



  • Photo Credit: Bill Franzen/Salon

    Rosalind "Roz" Chast (born November 26, 1954) is an American cartoonist and a staff cartoonist for The New Yorker. She grew up in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, the only child of an assistant principal and a high school teacher who subscribed to The New Yorker. Her earliest cartoons were published in Christopher Street and The Village Voice. In 1978 The New Yorker accepted one of her cartoons and has since published more than 800. She also publishes cartoons in Scientific American and the Harvard Business Review.



  • Amit Chaudhuri (born 1962 ), is an Indian English author and academic. He was awarded the Sahitya Akademi Award, India's highest literary honour, in 2002 for his novel A New World. He is currently Professor of Contemporary Literature at the University of East Anglia. In 2012, Chaudhuri won the Infosys Prize for Humanities-Literary Studies for his imaginative and illuminating writings in literary criticism, which reflect a complex literary sensibility, and great theoretical mastery, along with a probing sense of detail.



  • Bernice Chauly is the author of five books of poetry and prose, including the award-winning memoir Growing Up with Ghosts (Matahari Books, 2011). She lectures in creative writing at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus and is the director of the George Town Literary Festival. She is currently editing her first novel, which begins during the Malaysian Reformasi movement of 1998.


  • A Zimbabwean writer, Brian Chikwava is the author of the novel Harare North and winner of the 2004 Caine Prize for African Writing for his story "Seventh Street Alchemy." His essay "Free Speech in Zimbabwe: The Story of the Blue-Stomached Lizard" appeared in the September 2006 issue of WLT.


  • Alberto Chimal is regarded as one of Mexico’s most talented writers of short and experimental fiction. Since publishing his first books before his twenties, he has gained a loyal audience and cult-figure status. The recipient of numerous literary prizes, including the prestigious National Short Story Prize, he is the author of more than twenty books, including two novels, Los esclavos (2009) and La torre y el jardín (2012). A professor of literature and creative writing, Chimal lives in Mexico City with his wife and two cats and tweets stories at @albertochimal.



  • Frank Chin was born in Berkeley, California, He attended college at the University of California, Berkeley. He received an American Book Award in 1989 for a collection of short stories, The Chinaman Pacific and Frisco R.R. Co., and another in 2000 for Lifetime Achievement. He currently resides in Los Angeles.
    Chin is considered to be one of the pioneers in Asian American theatre. He founded the Asian American Theatre Workshop, which became the Asian American Theater Company in 1973. He first gained notoriety as a playwright in the 1970s. His play The Chickencoop Chinaman was the first by an Asian American to be produced on a major New York stage. Stereotypes of Asian Americans, and traditional Chinese folklore are common themes in much of his work.
    In addition to his work as an author and playwright, Frank Chin has also worked extensively with Japanese American resisters of the draft in WWII. His novel, Born in the U.S.A., is dedicated to this subject.

    Chin is also a musician. In the mid-1960s, he taught Robbie Krieger, a member of The Doors how to play the Flamenco guitar.


  • Necia Chronister is an assistant professor of German at Kansas State University. Her areas of research specialization include contemporary German literature, women’s writing in German since 1989, gender studies, and cultural studies. She has published on contemporary authors Judith Hermann, Angela Krauss, and Antje Rávic Strubel.



  • Eddie Chuculate (Creek/Cherokee) is the author of the story collection Cheyenne Madonna (Black Sparrow Press, 2010) and a winner of the O. Henry Prize. He held a Wallace Stegner creative writing fellowship at Stanford University and graduated from the Institute of American Indian Arts. He later earned a master’s of fine arts degree at the University of Iowa’s Writers’ Workshop.



  • Eun-Gwi Chung is an associate professor at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, Korea. She earned her PhD in the Poetics Program at SUNY Buffalo. Her translations of Korean poetry with Brother Anthony have been published as The Colors of Dawn: Twentieth-Century Korean Poetry (2014) and Fifteen Seconds Without Sorrow (2014) in the US. This research was supported by a research grant from Hankuk University of Foreign Studies.



  • Harry Clifton (born 1952) is an Irish poet. He was born in Dublin, but has lived in Africa and Asia, as well as more recently in continental Europe. He has published five collections of poems in Ireland and the United Kingdom, including The Liberal Cage (1988) and The Desert Route: Selected Poems 1973–1988 (1992).



  • Jessica Cohen translates contemporary Israeli prose and poetry. Her translations include David Grossman’s critically acclaimed To the End of the Land and works by Amir Gutfreund, Yael Hedaya, Etgar Keret, Ronit Matalon, and Tom Segev.


  • Isabel Fargo Cole’s other translations include The Sleep of the Righteous, by Wolfgang Hilbig (Two Lines Press); The Jew Car, by Franz Fühmann; Collected Essays, by Friedrich Dürrenmatt; and “I, by Wolfgang Hilbig (all with Seagull Books). She also edits the online translation journal no man’s land


  • Paula Conlon teaches graduate and undergraduate Native American and world music classes at the University of Oklahoma along with experiential seminars on Native American music and dance. 



  • Photo by Annette Hornischer

    Peter Constantine’s recent translations include The Essential Writings of Rousseau, The Essential Writings of Machiavelli, and works by Chekhov, Tolstoy, Gogol, and Voltaire. A Guggenheim Fellow, he was awarded the PEN Translation Prize for Six Early Stories, by Thomas Mann, and the National Translation Award for The Undiscovered Chekhov. He is the director of the Program in Literary Translation at the University of Connecticut.



  • Michael Cope (b. 1952) is a jeweler, writer, and karate teacher living in Cape Town, South Africa. He is married to Julia Martin and has three children. He has published three novels, two volumes of poems, and a memoir.


  • Author of five books of fiction, Moira Crone’s works have appeared in dozens of anthologies, magazines, and journals. Her most recent work is the dystopian novel The Not Yet (2012).



  • Luis Alberto de Cuenca (b. 1950, Madrid) is perhaps the one Spanish poet today who has influenced most of the younger generations of poets. He recently received the National Poetry Award for his latest book of poetry, Cuaderno de vacaciones (Visor, 2014). His poetry combines urban reality, pop culture, and classical antiquity while maintaining his own identity through irony, elegance, and a tone of lightheartedness.



  • Louis-Philippe Dalembert (b. 1962) is a Haitian poet and novelist who writes in French and Haitian creole. He won the Prix special “Ville de Limoges” for his novel Noires Blessures in 2011. He divides his home between Berlin, Paris, and Port-au-Prince.



  • Jim Daniels’s new book, Birth Marks, was published by BOA Editions in 2013. Other recent books include Trigger Man: More Tales of the Motor City (fiction), Having a Little Talk with Capital P Poetry, and All of the Above, all published in 2011. His poem “Factory Love” is displayed on the roof of a race car. A native of Detroit, Daniels teaches at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.



  • Mahmoud Darwish (b. 1942) is an Arab poet and political activist. He has published around 30 poetry and prose collections that have been translated into 35 languages. Several of his poems have been put to music. In 1997, a documentary was producted about him by French-Israeli director Simone Bitton. Darwish is the winner of the 2001 Lannan Prize for Cultural Freedom.



  • Dr. J. P. (Jagannath Prasad) Das (b. 1936) is a well-known Oriya poet, playwright, and fiction writer. Most of his works have been translated into English and other Indian languages, and his plays have been staged in many languages all over India. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Saraswati Samman. A noted art historian, he has published several books on Orissan art.



  • J. Madison Davis is the author of eight mystery novels, including The Murder of Frau Schütz, an Edgar nominee, and Law and Order: Dead Line. He has also published seven nonfiction books and dozens of short stories and articles, including his crime and mystery column in WLT since 2004.


  • Dr. Robert Con Davis-Undiano is Executive Director for World Literature Today. RC (as he is called) joined OU’s faculty in 1980, and in 1999 he was named Executive Director of OU’s international magazine World Literature Today and holder of the Neustadt Professorship in Comparative Literature. In 1999, he received a Presidential Professorship, and in 2004 he became the third recipient of the prestigious Sullivant Award for Perceptivity. In 2005, he became Dean of OU’s Honors College.


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