Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Necia Chronister is an assistant professor of German at Kansas State University. Her areas of research specialization include contemporary German literature, women’s writing in German since 1989, gender studies, and cultural studies. She has published on contemporary authors Judith Hermann, Angela Krauss, and Antje Rávic Strubel.



  • Eun-Gwi Chung is an associate professor at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul, Korea. She earned her PhD in the Poetics Program at SUNY Buffalo. Her translations of Korean poetry with Brother Anthony have been published as The Colors of Dawn: Twentieth-Century Korean Poetry (2014) and Fifteen Seconds Without Sorrow (2014) in the US. This research was supported by a research grant from Hankuk University of Foreign Studies.



  • Harry Clifton (born 1952) is an Irish poet. He was born in Dublin, but has lived in Africa and Asia, as well as more recently in continental Europe. He has published five collections of poems in Ireland and the United Kingdom, including The Liberal Cage (1988) and The Desert Route: Selected Poems 1973–1988 (1992).



  • Jessica Cohen translates contemporary Israeli prose and poetry. Her translations include David Grossman’s critically acclaimed To the End of the Land and works by Amir Gutfreund, Yael Hedaya, Etgar Keret, Ronit Matalon, and Tom Segev.


  • Isabel Fargo Cole’s other translations include The Sleep of the Righteous, by Wolfgang Hilbig (Two Lines Press); The Jew Car, by Franz Fühmann; Collected Essays, by Friedrich Dürrenmatt; and “I, by Wolfgang Hilbig (all with Seagull Books). She also edits the online translation journal no man’s land


  • Paula Conlon teaches graduate and undergraduate Native American and world music classes at the University of Oklahoma along with experiential seminars on Native American music and dance. 



  • Photo by Annette Hornischer

    Peter Constantine’s most recent translation is Little Apples: New Stories, by Anton Chekhov. He has also translated works by Rousseau, Tolstoy, Machiavelli, and Thomas Mann.



  • Michael Cope (b. 1952) is a jeweler, writer, and karate teacher living in Cape Town, South Africa. He is married to Julia Martin and has three children. He has published three novels, two volumes of poems, and a memoir.


  • Author of five books of fiction, Moira Crone’s works have appeared in dozens of anthologies, magazines, and journals. Her most recent work is the dystopian novel The Not Yet (2012).



  • Luis Alberto de Cuenca (b. 1950, Madrid) is perhaps the one Spanish poet today who has influenced most of the younger generations of poets. He recently received the National Poetry Award for his latest book of poetry, Cuaderno de vacaciones (Visor, 2014). His poetry combines urban reality, pop culture, and classical antiquity while maintaining his own identity through irony, elegance, and a tone of lightheartedness.



  • Louis-Philippe Dalembert (b. 1962) is a Haitian poet and novelist who writes in French and Haitian creole. He won the Prix special “Ville de Limoges” for his novel Noires Blessures in 2011. He divides his home between Berlin, Paris, and Port-au-Prince.



  • Jim Daniels’s new book, Birth Marks, was published by BOA Editions in 2013. Other recent books include Trigger Man: More Tales of the Motor City (fiction), Having a Little Talk with Capital P Poetry, and All of the Above, all published in 2011. His poem “Factory Love” is displayed on the roof of a race car. A native of Detroit, Daniels teaches at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.



  • Mahmoud Darwish (b. 1942) is an Arab poet and political activist. He has published around 30 poetry and prose collections that have been translated into 35 languages. Several of his poems have been put to music. In 1997, a documentary was producted about him by French-Israeli director Simone Bitton. Darwish is the winner of the 2001 Lannan Prize for Cultural Freedom.



  • Dr. J. P. (Jagannath Prasad) Das (b. 1936) is a well-known Oriya poet, playwright, and fiction writer. Most of his works have been translated into English and other Indian languages, and his plays have been staged in many languages all over India. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Saraswati Samman. A noted art historian, he has published several books on Orissan art.



  • J. Madison Davis is the author of eight mystery novels, including The Murder of Frau Schütz, an Edgar nominee, and Law and Order: Dead Line. He has also published seven nonfiction books and dozens of short stories and articles, including his crime and mystery column in WLT since 2004.


  • Dr. Robert Con Davis-Undiano is Executive Director for World Literature Today. RC (as he is called) joined OU’s faculty in 1980, and in 1999 he was named Executive Director of OU’s international magazine World Literature Today and holder of the Neustadt Professorship in Comparative Literature. In 1999, he received a Presidential Professorship, and in 2004 he became the third recipient of the prestigious Sullivant Award for Perceptivity. In 2005, he became Dean of OU’s Honors College.



  • Diego De Silva (b. 1964) has written plays, screenplays, and six novels. His novel I Hadn’t Understood won the Naples Prize for fiction and was a finalist for the Strega Prize in Italy. His books have been translated into eight languages.



  • Sietse de Vries is a Dutch author. His novel Bak was published in 2012.



  • Aleš Debeljak is a Slovenian poet and cultural critic. His poetry books in English include The City and the Child, Dictionary of Silence, and Anxious Moments, and his nonfiction works include The Hidden Handshake: National Identity and Europe in the Post-Communist World, Reluctant Modernity: The Institution of Art and Its Historical Forms, and Twilight of the Idols: Recollections of a Lost Yugoslavia. A former Roberta Buffet Professor of International Studies at Northwestern University, he teaches at the University of Ljubljana and the Collège d’Europe, Natolin-Warsaw.



  • Ludovic Debeurme (b. 1971) is a French graphic novelist and illustrator. He first published his work in Comix 2000, an anthology. His graphic novel Lucille won the René Goscinny Prize in 2006.



  • Erwin Dejasse has a PhD in art history and is an exhibitions curator, academic researcher, and lecturer specialized in comics. He writes also regularly about art brut and other visual art forms at the margin. He is currently the curator of La “S” Grand Atelier’s art collection.



  • Guy Delisle (b. 1966) is a Canadian graphic novelist and animator. His graphic novel Chroniques de Jérusalem won the Angoulême International Comics Festival Prize for Best Album in 2012. In France, the graphic novel was a best-seller.



  • Friedrich Christian Delius (b. 1943) is a German writer who has published more than a dozen novels as well as poetry collections. His work has been translated into 17 languages. Some of the literary prizes he has received include the Joseph Breitbach Prize, the Georg Büchner Prize, and the Critics Prize.



  • Chard deNiord is Poet Laureate of Vermont and the author of five books of poetry, most recently Interstate (2015), The Double Truth (2011), and Night Mowing (2005). His book of essays and interviews with seven senior American poets, Sad Friends, Drowned Lovers, Stapled Songs, was published by Marick Press in 2011.


  • Author of critical essays, translations, and poems, Paul Scott Derrick teaches American literature at the University of Valencia in Spain.



  • Ming Di is a poet from China, author of six poetry collections in Chinese and one in collaborative English translation, River Merchant’s Wife (Marick Press, 2012). She is the editor of New Cathay—Contemporary Chinese Poetry (Tupelo, 2013) and co-translator of Empty Chairs (Graywolf, 2015).



  • Junot Díaz (b. 1968) is a Dominican-American writer, creative writing professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and fiction editor at Boston Review. His novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2008.



  • Wilhelm Dichter (b. 1935) is a Polish-American writer, his 1996 literary debut God’s Horse was nominated for the Nike, the top literary award in Poland. His second book The Atheists’ School also was nominated for the Nike. He and his wife currently reside in the Boston area.



  • Bernard Diederich (b. 1926) is a New Zealand-born writer and historian. His awards include the Maria Moors Cabot Gold Medal in 1976, the Overseas Press Club’s Mary Hemingway citation for the best reporting abroad in 1983, the James Nelson Goodsell Award in 2003, as well as the Caonabo de Oro Award in 2003.



  • Lisa DiGiovanni is Assistant Professor of Spanish at Indiana State University. Her areas of specialization include nineteenth- through twentieth-century Spanish Peninsular and Latin American literature and film from a transnational perspective, with an emphasis on the relationship among history, literature, memory, nostalgia, and gender.


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