Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Photo by Bonnie Perkinson

    Sholeh Wolpé

    Sholeh Wolpé (www.sholehwolpe.com) was born in Iran and has lived in Trinidad, UK, and the United States. About her poems, the Poetry Foundation writes, “Wolpé’s concise, unflinching, and often wry free verse explores violence, culture, and gender.” A recipient of the 2014 PEN Heim, 2013 Midwest Book Award, 2010 Lois Roth Persian Translation prize, among others, her publications include four collections of poetry, a play, three books of translations, and three anthologies. Her translation of The Conference of the Birds (Norton, 2017) has been hailed by Reza Aslan as “timeless as the masterpiece itself.” Wolpé’s writings have been translated into eleven languages.



  • Photo: Tai Ngai Lung

    Jennifer Wong

    Born and raised in Hong Kong, Jennifer Wong studied English at Oxford University and has a creative writing PhD from Oxford Brookes University. She is the author of Goldfish (2013) and teaches part-time at City Lit and Oxford Brookes.



  • Photo by Nitch Photography

    Alison Wong

    Alison Wong is a fourth-generation New Zealander living in Geelong, Australia. Her poetry collection, Cup, was shortlisted for Best First Book for Poetry at the 2007 Montana New Zealand Book Awards, and her poetry was selected for Best New Zealand Poems 2006, 2007, and 2015. Her novel, As the Earth Turns Silver, won the 2010 New Zealand Post Book Award for Fiction and was shortlisted for the 2010 Australian Prime Minister’s Literary Awards. She is working on another novel and a memoir about New Zealand, Australia, and China.



  • Karenne Wood

    Karenne Wood, an enrolled member of the Monacan Indian Nation, holds an MFA in poetry and a PhD in linguistic anthropology. She is the author of two poetry collections, Markings on Earth (2000) and Weaving the Boundary (2016). Her poems have appeared in such journals as the Kenyon Review, Orion, and Shenandoah.


  • Jordan Woodward

    Jordan Woodward is a master’s student in English specializing in composition, rhetoric, and literacy at the University of Oklahoma. In her free time, she enjoys reading, writing, exploring nature, and riding her bicycle.



  • Angus Woodward

    Angus Woodward’s books of fiction are Down at the End of the River, Americanisation, and Oily. His recent work in graphic memoir appears in Shenandoah, Split Rock Review, Lumina, and Slag Glass City, among others, and is currently being serialized by Hobart. Angus lives, writes, illustrates, and teaches in Baton Rouge.


  • Grady C. Wray

    Grady C. Wray is an associate professor of Latin American literature and Spanish at the University of Oklahoma. His major investigatory focus concerns Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and other early-modern Hispanic women writers. Recently he has taken on several translation projects of contemporary poetry and fiction.



  • Jay Wright

    From his initial appearance in the Langston Hughes–edited anthology New Negro Poets U.S.A. (1964), Jay Wright (b. 1935, Albuquerque) has published fourteen volumes of poetry and been awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, the American Book Award, and Yale’s Bollingen Prize. Key works include Transfigurations: Collected Poems (2000) and The Guide Signs (2007), both from LSU Press. His collection Boleros was translated into Spanish and published by the University of Veracruz in 2005.



  • Photo by Taylor Slifko

    Amy Wright

    Amy Wright is the author of Paper Concert: A Conversation in the Round (2021) as well as three poetry books and six chapbooks. She has received two Peter Taylor Fellowships to the Kenyon Review Writers Workshop, an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Tennessee Arts Commission, and a fellowship to Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her essays and poems appear in Fourth Genre, Georgia Review, Ninth Letter, and elsewhere.



  • Photo by David Shankbone

    C. D. Wright

    Carolyn D. "C. D." Wright (born January 6, 1949) is an American poet.


  • Christiane Wyrwa

    Christiane Wyrwa studied German and English literature at Göttingen, Durham GB, and Berlin, where she took a PhD in 1981. With her husband, Matthias Klein, she edited Kuno Raeber’s Collected Works in seven volumes from 2002 to 2010.



  • Xi Xi

    Xi Xi (the pen name of Cheung Yin) has written more than thirty books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. One of Hong Kong’s most beloved and prolific authors, she has won numerous international awards, most recently the 2019 Newman Prize for Chinese Literature.



  • Xiao Hai

    Xiao Hai (b. 1987) came from Shangqiu City in Henan Province, the philosopher Zhuangzi’s hometown. He has drifted in different cities as a migrant worker for many years and composed over five hundred poems. He was a member of the Picun Literature Group and won the Best Poet prize at the First Laborers’ Literature Awards.



  • Xiao An

    Xiao An (b. 1964) is often regarded as a “poet’s poet” in China. One of the few women in the experimental poetry group feifei, meaning “neither/nor,” she has been working as a nurse in a psychiatric hospital for twenty years while steadily publishing poetry. Her writing is influenced by classical Chinese poetry but has a contemporary feel in its themes and sensibility.



  • PHOTO: Paul Hilton

    Xu Xi

    Xu Xi (@xuxiwriter) is the author of fourteen books, most recently This Fish Is Fowl: Essays of Being (2019). An Indonesian-Chinese-American diehard transnational, she splits her life, unevenly, between the state of New York and the rest of the world.



  • Min Yang

    Min Yang is an assistant professor of Chinese Studies, Department of World Languages and Cultures, Bowling Green State University. Her research interests include trauma studies, contemporary Chinese literature, and visual culture.



  • Yi Sha

    Yi Sha, born in Chengdu in 1966, is considered one of China’s foremost avant-garde writers. He has published over twenty books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction; his influential online column, New Century Poetry Canon, recommends a poem a day to a wide readership throughout the Chinese-speaking world.



  • Hülya Yıldız

    Hülya Yıldız is an assistant professor of comparative literature at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara. 


  • Man-Fung Yip

    Man-Fung Yip is assistant professor of Film & Media Studies at the University of Oklahoma. He has recently completed a book manuscript entitled Martial Arts Cinema and Hong Kong Modernity: Aesthetics, Representation, Circulation



  • Yūichi Yokoyama

    Yūichi Yokoyama was born in 1967 in Miyazaki, Japan, and currently lives and works in a Tokyo suburb. He received his MFA in oil painting from Musashino Art University in 1990 and has been active as a manga artist since 1995.



  • Yoo An-Jin

    Yoo An-Jin is a Korean poet, essayist, and novelist. In 1970 she published the first of the seventeen collections of poetry she has published so far. She retired from her position as a professor at Seoul National University in 2006. In 2012 she became a member of Korea’s National Academy of Arts. She has received many prestigious literary awards.



  • Yoo Heekyung

    Yoo Heekyung 유희경 is a South Korean poet and playwright. He is the author of Oneul achim daneo (2011), Dangsinui jari – namuro jaraneun bangbeop (2013), Uriege jamsi sinieotdeon (2018), and other collections. He is a playwright with the theater company 독 (dock) and a member of the poetry collective 작란 (作亂) (jaknan). In 2019 Yoo was awarded the Hyundae Munhak Sang (Contemporary Literature Award) for his poetry. He runs ,wit n cynical, a series of poetry bookstores and project spaces in Seoul. 


  • Sunmin Yoon

    Sunmin Yoon is an ethnomusicologist specializing in Mongolian folk songs. She is currently on the faculty at Kent State University.



  • Yoss

    Two of Yoss’s science-fiction novels have been translated into English: A Planet for Rent and Super Extra Grande. In 2017 his space opera, Condomnauts, was published in English. Born in Havana in 1969, Yoss is also the lead singer in the heavy-metal band Tenaz.


  • Conrad Young

    Conrad Young is an intern at WLT and undergraduate at the University of Oklahoma pursuing a double major in astrophysics and the history of science. Among other interests, he enjoys reading, following politics, gardening, cycling, and brewing beer.



  • Lee Young-Kwang

    Lee Young-Kwang is a professor of creative writing and media studies at Korea University. He has published four collections of poetry; in 2011 All the Evening Wishes won the prestigious Mi-Dang literature award. Other awards include the Roe-Jak Prize (2008) and Ji-Hoon Prize for Literature (2011).


  • King Yu

    King Yu is a researcher and freelance translator in China after receiving his PhD in translation studies in the UK. He is now focusing on the translation and reception of contemporary Chinese literature in the English-speaking world.



  • Yu Jian

    One of China’s leading avant-garde poets, Yu Jian (b. 1954) began writing poetry in the 1970s. A versatile and prolific writer, he has published over forty books of poetry, prose, essays, and photography. His controversial 1994 poem, “File Zero,” is considered one of the most innovative and radical works in the history of contemporary Chinese poetry. He lives in Kunming, China.


  • Yu-Yun Hsieh

    Yu-Yun Hsieh is a writer, critic, and translator, currently a PhD candidate in comparative literature at the Graduate Center, CUNY. She is an award-winning novelist from Taiwan and a former fiction fellow of the Writers’ Institute in NYC. Her Chinese translation of Thomas Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49 was published in 2014.



  • Kyūsaku Yumeno

    Kyūsaku Yumeno, which translates roughly to “a field where dreams are always growing,” was the pen name of the Japanese writer Taidō Sugiyama (b. 1889). Notorious in Japan for unusual, often downright bizarre detective stories, Yumeno is famous as one of Japan’s first avant-garde writers and as a product of the rapid modernization and westernization of the Taishō era (1912–26). His magnum opus, the experimental mystery Dogura Magura, was adapted for film in the late 1980s. He died suddenly at the age of forty-seven in 1936.


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