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  • Wilhelm Dichter

    Wilhelm Dichter (b. 1935) is a Polish-American writer, his 1996 literary debut God’s Horse was nominated for the Nike, the top literary award in Poland. His second book The Atheists’ School also was nominated for the Nike. He and his wife currently reside in the Boston area.



  • Bernard Diederich

    Bernard Diederich (b. 1926) is a New Zealand-born writer and historian. His awards include the Maria Moors Cabot Gold Medal in 1976, the Overseas Press Club’s Mary Hemingway citation for the best reporting abroad in 1983, the James Nelson Goodsell Award in 2003, as well as the Caonabo de Oro Award in 2003.



  • Lisa DiGiovanni

    Lisa DiGiovanni is Assistant Professor of Spanish at Indiana State University. Her areas of specialization include nineteenth- through twentieth-century Spanish Peninsular and Latin American literature and film from a transnational perspective, with an emphasis on the relationship among history, literature, memory, nostalgia, and gender.



  • Lidija Dimkovska

    Lidija Dimkovska’s (b. 1971, Skopje, Macedonia) novels Hidden Camera (2004) and A Spare Life (2012) received the award of the Writers’ Union of Macedonia for the best prose book of the year. A Spare Life also received the European Union Prize for Literature (2013) and was longlisted for the Best Translated Book Award 2017. Her third novel, Non-Oui, was shortlisted for the award of the Writers’ Union of Macedonia for best prose book of the year.



  • Kiki Dimoula

    Kiki Dimoula is a member of the Academy of Athens. She has been awarded the Greek State Prize twice, the Grand State Prize, the Ouranis Prize, and the Aristeion of Letters (given by the Academy of Athens), as well as the European Prize for Literature. Her poetry has been translated into English, French, Danish, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, and many other languages.



  • Fred Dings

    Fred Dings’s books of poetry include Eulogy for a Private Man (TriQuarterly Books), After the Solstice (Orchises Press), and two chapbooks, Vespers and The Bruised Sky. The poems featured here are part of his newly completed third full-length collection, not yet submitted for publication. Dings teaches in the MFA program at the University of South Carolina.



  • Cem Dinlenmiş

    Cem Dinlenmiş is interested in a variety of narrative forms ranging from cartoons and illustrations to graphic journalism and paintings. Since 2006, he has been drawing a satirical series for comic magazines Penguen and Uykusuz in Turkey.



  • Tessa Ditner

    Tessa Ditner is half French and half English, which is the main problem. She is a Cambridge University philosophy graduate from Corpus Christi College, where she got told off constantly for putting on plays instead of writing essays on free will. She specialized in literary journalism at Roehampton University during her MA, because it seemed so wonderfully nosey. You can follow her misadventures in London’s art and theater scene on Twitter @CultureKiddo.


  • Arthur Dixon

    Arthur Dixon is a poet, translator, and the managing editor of Latin American Literature Today at the University of Oklahoma. He is currently working on an MA in Spanish at OU. His most recent project is a book-length translation of Cuidados intensivos (Intensive care), the latest verse collection by Venezuelan poet Arturo Gutiérrez Plaza.



  • Assia Djebar

    Assia Djebar (b. 1936) is the pen name of Fatima-Zohra Imalayen. She was born in a small coastal town in Algeria, where her father taught French. In 1955, she was the first woman to be accepted into the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, where she published her first novel in 1957. Her pen name originated from this novel, which she feared would anger her father. Her first collection of verse was published in 1969, the same year that she would also publish her first work of drama. In 1978 she became a film director, and her work on La nouba des femmes du Mont Chenoua ("The Mount Chenoua Band of Women") granted her the prestigious Grand Prize at the Venice Film Festival in 1979. In 2005, based on her superior body of work, Djebar was accepted to the Académie française and represents the first elector from the Mahgreb.



  • Dubravka Djurić

    Dubravka Djurić (b. 1961) is a Croatian author of poetry and essays. She performs her writings as well.



  • Tamas Dobozy

    Tamas Dobozy is a Canadian writer and teacher at Laurier University in Ontario. In 2012, he won the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize for Siege 13, his book of short stories.



  • Christopher Domínguez Michael

    Christopher Domínguez Michael (b. 1962) is a Mexican writer, historian, and literary critic. In 2006, he received the Guggenheim Fellowship. Since 2010 he has spent time as a research associate at the College of Mexico.



  • Diego Doncel

    Diego Doncel is a Spanish poet, novelist, and critic. The volume Territorios bajo vigilancia (Visor, 2015) is a compilation of all of his poetry. His latest book is El fin del mundo en las televisiones (Visor, 2015). He has also published the novels El ángulo de los secretos femeninos, Mujeres que dicen adiós con la mano, and Amantes en el tiempo de la infamia.



  • Photo by Tineke de Lange

    Han Dong

    Han Dong (b. 1961) is a Chinese writer and blogger. He has work in both Chinese and English.



  • Erin Donnelly

    Erin Donnelly is a WLT intern studying professional writing and international area studies at the University of Oklahoma. She enjoys travel, books, coffee, and dogs. 


  • Leonidas Donskis

    Elected a member of the European Parliament in 2009, Leonidas Donskis is a philosopher, political theorist, historian of ideas, social analyst, and political commentator. As a public figure in Lithuania, he also acts as a defender of human rights and civil liberties. Born on August 13, 1962, in Klaipeda, Lithuania, Donskis received his first doctorate in philosophy from the University of Vilnius, and later earned his second doctorate in social and moral philosophy from the University of Helsinki, Finland.



  • Hélène Dorion

    Hélène Dorion (b. 1958) is a Canadian poet, essayist, and novelist. Some of her recent awards include being named Chevalier de l’Ordre national du Québec and being a finalist for the Prix du livre jeunesse des bibliothèques de Montréal for The Cradled Life.



  • Madeleine Dorst

    Madeleine Dorst is an intern at WLT and an undergraduate at the University of Oklahoma studying English writing and nonprofit administration. In her free time, she enjoys watching movies, playing board games, and long, meandering walks.



  • Sébastien Doubinsky

    Sébastien Doubinsky (b. 1963) is a French writer, translator, poet, and editor. He writes in both French and English and has published novels in both languages, as well as three novels in Danish.



  • Photo by John Henry Doucette

    Sean Thomas Dougherty

    Sean Thomas Dougherty is the author or editor of fifteen books including The Second O of Sorrow and All You Ask for Is Longing: Poems 1994–2014, both published by BOA Editions. His awards include a Fulbright lectureship to the Balkans and two Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Fellowships. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry, North American Review, and the New York Times. He lives in Erie, Pennsylvania, with the poet Lisa M. Dougherty and their two daughters, where he works for the Barber National Institute on Autism.



  • Marcia Douglas

    Marcia Douglas is the author of the novels The Marvellous Equations of the Dread, Madam Fate, and Notes from a Writer’s Book of Cures and Spells as well as a poetry collection, Electricity Comes to Cocoa Bottom. Her awards include an NEA Fellowship and a UK Poetry Book Society Recommendation. The Marvellous Equations of the Dread was longlisted for a 2016 Republic of Consciousness Prize and a 2017 OCM Bocas Prize for Caribbean Literature. She is an associate professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder.



  • Jennifer Doyle

    Jennifer Doyle is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside, where she teaches gender studies, visual culture, and American literature. She is the author of Sex Objects: Art and the Dialectics of Desire (2006) and Hold It Against Me: Difficulty and Emotion in Contemporary Art (forthcoming from Duke University Press). She writes a feminist soccer blog, From a Left Wing (fromaleftwing.blogspot.com), and is working on a book about art and sport, tentatively titled The Athletic Gesture.



  • Photo by Jerry Hart

    Brian Doyle

    Brian Doyle is the editor of Portland Magazine. He is the author of many books of essays and fiction, notably the sprawling Oregon novel Mink River and the headlong sea novel The Plover. His latest essay collection, Children and Other Wild Animals, was published in 2014 by Oregon State University Press. 



  • Photo by Chris Boland

    Margaret Drabble

    Margaret Drabble (b. 1939) is an English novelist, biographer, and critic. She has published 17 novels, and in 2011, she was awarded the Golden PEN Award.



  • Nataša Dragnić

    Nataša Dragnić (b. 1965) is a Croatian writer and poet. She currently lives in Germany where she works as a foreign language instructor.


  • Boris Dralyuk

    Boris Dralyuk has translated and co-translated several volumes of poetry and prose from Russian and Polish, including, most recently, Dariusz Sośnicki’s The World Shared (BOA, 2014), with Piotr Florczyk, and Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry (Pushkin Press, 2015) and Odessa Stories (Pushkin Press, 2016). He received first prize in the 2011 Compass translation competition and, with Irina Mashinski, first prize in the 2012 Brodsky/Spender translation competition. He is co-editor, with Robert Chandler and Irina Mashinski, of The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry (Penguin Classics, 2015) and the editor of 1917: Stories and Poems from the Russian Revolution (Pushkin Press, 2016).


  • Jim Drummond

    Jim Drummond is a lawyer and writer in Round Rock, Texas.


  • Žydrūnas Drungilas

    Žydrūnas Drungilas did his graduate studies at Klaipeda University in Lithuania and the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is currently editor of the weekly cultural journal Šiaurės Atėnai in Vilnius, Lithuania. Between rare but memorable visits to literary salons, he has been seen wandering the streets of Vilnius in a state best described as inscrutable.



  • Zoran Drvenkar

    Zoran Drvenkar (b. 1967) is a Croatian German novelist. His novel Sorry won the Friedrich-Glauser Prize in 2010.


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