Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

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  • Julian Stannard's third collection is The Parrots of Villa Gruber Discover Lapis Lazuli (Salmon, 2011), which includes the three poems featured here and completes a trilogy of works about the city of Genoa and its environs. Having taught at the University of Genoa for many years, he now teaches creative writing and English at the University of Winchester (UK). His work appears in the TLS, The Spectator, Poetry Review, Poetry London, Ambit, Guardian, PN Review, Poetry Wales, Resine (Italy), and Nuova Corrente (Italy). He is the author of The Poetic Achievements of Donald Davie and Charles Tomlinson: Expanding Vision, Voice and Rhythm in Late Twentieth-Century English Poetry (Edwin Mellen Press, 2010). He won the Troubadour Poetry Prize in 2010. Copyright © 2011 by Julian Stannard



  • Photo: Sam Masinter

    Ilan Stavans is Lewis-Sebring Professor of Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College. He edited All the Odes (FSG) of Pablo Neruda, published last year. A Most Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States (Basic, with cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz) will be out in July. He is the publisher of the digital imprint Restless Books (www.restlessbooks.com) and a cofounder of the Great Books Summer program at Amherst, Stanford, and Oxford (www.greatbookssummer.com).


  • Alex Stein is the co-author, with Yahia Lababidi, of The Artist As Mystic: Conversations with Yahia Lababidi (Onesuch Press). He is also the author of the genre-blurring Made-Up Interviews, Imaginary Artists (Ugly Duckling Presse).



  • Ludwig Steinherr was born in Munich in 1962. He earned a PhD with a dissertation on Hegel and Quine. He is the author of twelve award-winning volumes of poetry and is a member of the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts. His work has been translated into numerous languages. Recent publications include Kometenjagd (2009) and Ganz Ohr (2012), from which these poems were taken, as well as Das Mädchen der Maler Ich (2012). An English edition of his collected poems, Before the Invention of Paradise, was published in 2010.



  • Dinah Assouline Stillman teaches French language, literature, culture, and French and francophone cinema at the University of Oklahoma. She studied at the Sorbonne and the Institut des Langues et Civilisations Orientales in Paris and has a special interest in Muslim-Jewish relations in France, the Middle East, and North Africa.


  • Oonagh Stransky’s (oonaghstransky.comEnglish translation of Pope Francis’s The Name of God Is Mercy was published by Random House in January 2016.


  • From England, Juned Subhan is a graduate of Glasgow University, with creative work published in numerous journals including Ontario Review, Cimarron Review, North American Review, Moon City Review, Indiana Review, and Bryant Literary Review.



  • Heather I. Sullivan is professor of German and comparative literature at Trinity University. She is co-editor of German Ecocriticism in the Anthropocene (2017); The Early History of Embodied Cognition from 1740–1920 (2016); and of special journal issues on ecocriticism in New German Critique (2016), Colloquia Germanica (2014), and ISLE (2012).


  • Clare Sullivan is Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Louisville and Director of their Graduate Certificate in Translation. She has published translations of Argentine writer Alicia Kozameh's 259 saltos, uno inmortal (2001; Eng. 259 Leaps, the Last Immortal, 2007) and Mexican Cecilia Urbina's Un martes como hoy (2004; Eng. A Tuesday Like Today, 2008) with Wings Press. She received an NEA Translation Grant in 2010 to work with the poetry of Natalia Toledo (see WLT, Jan. 2011, 20–21).



  • Pireeni Sundaralingam is a cognitive scientist and poet. Her poems appear in over thirty journals, including Ploughshares and American Poetry Review. A Climate Change Fellow at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, Global Salzburg Fellow, and lead strategist on human development for the United Nations Museum of Humanity, she is currently writing a book on poetry and the brain.



  • Photo by Katy Swarovskaya

    Feodor Swarovski was born in Moscow in 1971. He emigrated to Denmark in 1990 at the age of nineteen but returned to Moscow in 1997. He is a journalist who has worked for Russian television as well as print media. Swarovski's first book of poetry, Vse khotiat byt' robotami (2007; Everyone wants to be a robot), received the Moskovsky Schet prize and was short-listed for the Andrei Belyi prize. He was short-listed for the Andrei Belyi prize again in 2009 for his poetry collection Puteshestvenniki vo vremeni (Time travelers). Swarovski's poetry has been translated into English, Bulgarian, Danish, Polish, Slovenian, and Ukranian.


  • Pia Tafdrup (b. 1952, Copenhagen, www.tafdrup.com) is a Danish poet and writer and member of the Danish Academy and the European Academy of Poetry. Among several prizes, she received the Nordic Council's Literature Prize in 1999 and the Nordic Prize in 2006 from the Swedish Academy. Tafdrup has published fourteen collections of poetry, including Spring Tide (Forest Books, 1989), Queen's Gate (Bloodaxe, 2001), and Tarkovsky's Horses (Bloodaxe, 2010). She has also published a statement of her poetics, Walking over the Water, two plays, and two novels. Her poems are translated into more than thirty languages. English translations of her poems have been published in more than sixty literary journals in the UK, US, Canada, and Australia. She is profiled in Thousandborn: The Poet PiaTafdrup (Cosmo Film a/s).



  • Abdellah Taïa (b. 1973, Rabat) is the first Moroccan and Arab writer to publicly declare his homosexuality. Editions du Seuil has published five of his books, including L’armée du salut (2006; Eng. Salvation Army, 2009), Une mélancolie arabe (2008; Eng. An Arab Melancholy, 2012), and Lettres à un jeune marocain (2009). His novel Le jour du Roi was awarded the prestigious French Prix de Flore in 2010, and his latest novel, Infidèles, came out in 2012. Taïa’s work has been translated into several languages, and he also appeared in Rémi Lange’s film The Road to Love (2001). His American publisher is Semiotext(e).



  • Photo by Péter Peti

    Zsuzsa Takács (b. 1938) is the doyenne of contemporary Hungarian poetry (see WLT, Sept. 2015, 46­–47). She started publishing in the early 1970s. Her volumes address both private and historical traumas, the impotence of empathy and language when faced with the suffering of the creature—of a beloved person, or one’s own. She lives in Budapest.



  • Photo © Renaud Camus

    Farid Tali (b. 1977) is a French writer of Moroccan origin. In 1999 he published his first book, a collaborative journal with Renaud Camus titled Incomparable. His debut solo novella, Prosopopée, appeared in 2001 and is forthcoming in English translation from Action Books in 2016.



  • Photo by Lacey Creighton

    Jordan Tannahill is a playwright, theatre director, and filmmaker. In 2014 he won a Governor General’s Award for his book Age of Minority: 3 Solo Plays and was named “Canadian Artist of the Year” by the Globe & Mail. He runs a storefront theatre in Toronto called Videofag with William Ellis.


  • Phyllis Taoua is the author of Forms of Protest: Anti-Colonialism and Avant-Gardes in Africa, the Caribbean, and France (2002) and is completing her second book, Africa from African Perspectives: Their Voices, Our World and the Difference It Makes. Other publications have appeared in The Cambridge Companion to the African Novel, Transition, SubStance, Research in African Literatures, Cahier d’Études Africaines, and Journal of African Cultural Studies. In 2006 she was the recipient of a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation award and Resident Fellow at the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University.


  • Raymond Taras is Willy Brandt Professor at Sweden's Malmö University for 2010–11. He was director of Tulane University's world literature program before Hurricane Katrina forced its closure. He is the author of numerous scholarly books on nationalism and identities in Europe.



  • Agustín del Moral Tejeda was born in Las Choapas, Veracruz, in 1956. An accomplished writer, journalist, editor, translator, and activist, he currently lives and works in Xalapa at the University of Veracruz. He has published two novels, Nuestra alma melancólica en conserva (1997) and Cuéntame lo que me pasa (2009), as well as a work of creative nonfiction, Un Crack Mexicano: Alberto Onofre (2003). For many years he served as director of the university press of Veracruz, a key supporter of literary publication in Mexico.



  • Photo by Adriana Vichi

    Lygia Fagundes Telles, Brazil’s nominee for the Nobel Prize in Literature for 2016, was born in São Paulo in 1923. She is widely considered one of Brazil’s most important writers and published her first book of short stories at the age of fifteen. She was inducted into the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1985. She has won more than twenty-five national and international awards for her writing, including the Prêmio Camões, the most prestigious for Portuguese-language writers.



  • Víctor Téran was born in Juchitán de Zaragoza in 1958. His work has been published extensively in magazines and anthologies throughout Mexico (see WLT, May 2009, 24–25). Since 2000, he has also appeared in anthologies such as Reversible Monuments (Copper Canyon, 2002) and Words of the True Peoples (University of Texas Press, 2005).



  • Misrak Terefe is a renowned poet in Ethiopia who published the first poetry VCD as a female poet. A founding member of the Tobiya Poetic Jazz Group, she has various joint publications with other writers as well as the Tobiya poetry and jazz DVD (vol. 1) release.



  • Photo by Dragan Radovancevic

    ko ko thett is a poet by choice and a Burmese by chance. In between he is a poetry translator, editor, and anthologist of contemporary Burmese poetry (see WLT, January 2012, 35–41). His first anthology, Bones Will Crow: Fifteen Contemporary Burmese Poets, was published in the US by Northern Illinois University Press. He lives in Vienna and writes in both Burmese and English.



  • Dominic Thomas is Madeleine L. Letessier Professor and chair of the Department of French and Francophone Studies at UCLA. He is the author or co-author of numerous books, including Black France (2007), Africa and France (2013), Colonial Culture in France since the Revolution (2014), The Invention of Race (2014), and Vers la guerre des identités (2016). He is the editor of the Global African Voices series at Indiana University Press.



  • Sergej Timofejev is a member of Orbita, a creative collective of Russian poets and artists, as well as a Riga-based journalist, translator, and DJ. Since the late 1980s, he has published in the journals Rodnik, Mitin zhurnal, Vavilon, Znamia, and others. A pioneer of video poetry in Russian, his first video poem, "Orchestra Rehearsal" (1995), may be seen on YouTube. Timofejev is the author of six books of poetry, three of which were published in Latvia and three in Russia. He was short-listed for the Andrei Belyi prize in 2002. His poetry has been translated into several languages.


  • Julia Tindell is a junior English major at Gustavus Adolphus College. When she graduates, she hopes to obtain a PhD in English and become a college professor. She currently works as a tutor in the Writing Center at Gustavus and plans to study abroad next fall at Oxford University.



  • Erkut Tokman (b. 1971, Istanbul) is a Turkish poet, translator, interviewer, and editor of the Yasakmeyve literary review. He is a member of the Turkish and Italian PEN centers, works for the Writers in Prisons Committee, and serves as a foreign relations representative and board member of Intercultural Poetry and the Translation Academy of Turkey.



  • Natalia Toledo has written four books of poetry and two of prose, all bilingual (Zapotec/Spanish). She has read her poetry in Latin America and the United States as well as Europe and Asia. Her work as a jewelry and clothing designer and chef reiterates the lively imagery of her poetry.



  • Tomas Tranströmer (born 15 April 1931 in Stockholm) is a Swedish writer, poet and translator, who has sold thousands of volumes in his native country, and whose poetry has been translated into over sixty languages. He has published ten volumes of poetry in Swedish, from 17 dikter (17 Poems; 1954) to For levande och doda (1989; Eng. "For Living and Dead"). He won the 1990 Neustadt Prize.



  • Photo by Daniel Boud

    Mark Tredinnick is a poet, nature writer, and essayist. The winner in 2011 of the Montreal Poetry Prize and in 2012 of the Cardiff Poetry Prize, he is the editor of Australian Love Poems and the author of Australia’s Wild Weather, The Blue Plateau, Fire Diary, and eight other books. His new book of poems, Bluewren Cantos, will appear in early 2014. He is a founding member of the Kangaloon Group of Concerned Artists and Scholars. Read more at his website www.marktredinnick.com.au.


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