Authors

Find your favorite authors featured in WLT or browse the entire list.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
  • Since 2003 John Turnbull has edited The Global Game (www.theglobalgame.com), a website of world soccer culture. He is coeditor of The Global Game: Writers on Soccer (2008) and lives in Atlanta. His Pushcart Prize–nominated essay "Alone in the Woods: The Literary Landscape of Soccer's 'Last Defender'" appeared in the July 2010 issue of WLT.


  • Frederick Turner, Founders Professor of Arts and Humanities at the University of Texas at Dallas, was educated at Oxford University. Poet, critic, translator, philosopher, former editor of The Kenyon Review, he has authored over thirty books, including The Culture of Hope, Genesis, Hadean Eclogues, Shakespeare’s Twenty-First Century Economics, Paradise, Natural Religion, Epic, and Two Ghost Poems. He has been nominated internationally over eighty times for the Nobel Prize in Literature.



  • Photo by Shevaun Williams

    Dubravka Ugrešić is a European writer, author of several novels and volumes of essays that have been translated into over twenty languages. Recipient of several prestigious literary awards, including the 2016 Neustadt International Prize for Literature, Ugrešić was born and raised in the former Yugoslavia, then in Croatia, and now lives in the Netherlands.



  • Photo © Ekaterina Bogdanova

    Amarsana Ulzytuev (b. 1963), an alumnus of the Gorky Literature Institute, is from the Buryatia capital of Ulan-Ude, one hundred miles southeast of Lake Baikal. Just off the presses is his third book, Anaphora. His first two are Morning Forever (2002) and Abovenew (2009, with an afterword by Alexander Eremenko), and a fourth is forthcoming from Vremya. Two of Alex Cigale’s translations of his other poems appeared in the May 2014 issue of WLT.



  • Sandee Gertz Umbach is a poet/writer from western Pennsylvania, now living in Nashville. She is the author of The Pattern Maker’s Daughter (Bottom Dog, 2012) and is completing her memoir, Some Girls Have Auras of Bright Colors. She is a PA Council on the Arts fellow, a winner of the Sandburg-Livesay Award, and her poetry collection earned second place in the Working Class Studies Tillie Olsen award competition. She has an MFA from Wilkes University. 



  • Giuseppe Ungaretti (1888-1970) was born in Alexandria, Egypt into an Italian family, where he was educated in French and began working as a journalist and literary critic. Ungaretti moved to Paris in 1912, but enlisted in the infantry in World War I and fought in the trenches in Northern Italy. World War I served as the catalyst for Ungaretti's venture into poetry, and he published his first collection of poetry in 1916. Among his many affiliations, Ungaretti's works were influenced by Dadaism, Hermeticism (of which he helped to revoluntionize in the 1930s), Symbolism, and Futurism, among others. Ungaretti is the first laureate of the Neustadt Prize, he won the prestigious literary prize in 1970.



  • Photo by Daniel Pickett

    Samrat Upadhyay is the author of Arresting God in Kathmandu, a Whiting Award winner; The Royal Ghosts, which won the Asian American Literary Award; The Guru of Love, a New York Times Notable Book and a San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of the Year; and Buddha’s Orphans, a novel. He has written for the New York Times and has appeared on BBC Radio and National Public Radio. Upadhyay teaches in the creative writing program at Indiana University. He is currently working on a new novel titled Mask and a collection of stories called Freak Street, a real street in Kathmandu where the hippies used to hang out in the 1960s.



  • Lee Upton’s sixth book of poetry, Bottle the Bottles the Bottles the Bottles, appeared from the Cleveland State University Poetry Center in 2015. Her collection of short stories, The Tao of Humiliation (BOA Editions), was named one of the best books of 2014 by Kirkus Reviews.


  • Ashok Vajpeyi (b. 1941) has published thirteen books of poetry and five books of literary criticism in Hindi, plus four books on the visual arts and music in English. His work has been translated into many languages, with books in English, French, and Polish. He has also received the Sahitya Akademi award, Kabir Samman, and high civil honors from the governments of France and Poland. A poet, critic, editor, and lover of arts, he lives in Delhi where he is also currently chairman of the Lalit Kala Akademi, the National Academy of Visual Arts.



  • Rositta Joseph Valiyamattam is coordinator, Centre for Languages, GITAM University, India. A gold medalist in English from Andhra University, her doctoral thesis was on the Indian English novel. Her book Personal and National Destinies in Independent India was published by Cambridge Scholars (UK) in 2016. She has presented twenty papers at national and international seminars and published over thirty articles in reputed literary journals and anthologies.


  • The author of seven books and numerous articles and book reviews, Nikolaos van Dam is a former Ambassador of the Netherlands in Baghdad, Cairo, Ankara, Berlin, and Jakarta.



  • Lee van Laer (www.nefersweetie.com) was born in Yonkers, New York. He is an artist, musician, photographer, poet, and writer. He is currently one of the senior editors for Parabola magazine.



  • Iossif Ventura was born in Greece and lives in Athens. He writes and translates poetry and participates in poetry-related fora and conferences. His elegy TANAIΣ, in a bilingual edition, was published by Red Heifer Press in 2015. His poems have been translated into English, French, Hebrew, Spanish, Serbian, and Arabic (see WLT, Jan. 2016, 22–25).


  • Lawrence Venuti is, most recently, the author of Translation Changes Everything: Theory and Practice (Routledge) and the translator of Ernest Farrés’s Edward Hopper: Poems (Graywolf), which won the Robert Fagles Translation Prize. He guest-edited the September 2009 cover feature of WLT devoted to Catalan literature. Click here to read a review of Translation Changes Everything.



  • Enrique Vila-Matas (born March 31, 1948, in Barcelona) is a Spanish Catalan novelist who has had a long and outstanding literary career and is one of the most prestigious and original writers in contemporary Spanish fiction. He is the author of several award-winning books that mix different genres like metafiction and have been translated into thirty languages.



  • Photo: Oscar Garcia

    Nadia Villafuerte was born in Mexico in 1978. She is the author of two collections of short stories, Barcos en Houston (Ships in Houston) and ¿Te gusta el látex, cielo? (Do you like latex, Honey?), and the novel Por el lado salvaje (On the wild side).



  • Juan Villoro (Mexico City, 24 September 1956) is a Mexican writer and journalist. He has been well known among intellectual circles in Mexico, Latin America and Spain for years, but his success among the readers grew since receiving the Herralde Prize for his novel El testigo.



  • Photo by Dmitry Rozhkov

    Vladimir Nikolayevich Voinovich, also spelled Voynovich (Russian: Влади́мир Никола́евич Войно́вич) (born 26 September 1932), is a Russian (formerly Soviet) writer and a dissident. He is a member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Department of Language and Literature.


  • Rob Vollmar is WLT's book review editor.


  • Adelle Waldman is a novelist and writer for Slate, Vogue, and Gawker. She is best known for her first novel, "The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.", which was named one of 2013's best books by The New Yorker, The Economist, NPR, BookPage, and The Guardian, among many others.



  • Rebecca L. Walkowitz is associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of English and affiliate faculty in Comparative Literature at Rutgers University. She is the author of Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism beyond the Nation (2006) and Born Translated: The Contemporary Novel in an Age of World Literature (2015) and editor or coeditor of eight books, including A New Vocabulary for Global Modernism (2016).


  • Conrad Walters is a journalist at The Sydney Morning Herald.



  • The fifth laureate of the Newman Prize for Chinese Literature, Wang Anyi moved to Shanghai with her family when she was one year old. Like her mother, writer Ru Zhijuan (1925–98), Wang pursued a literary career and became very successful in the early 1980s. Wang is prolific and innovative: she writes consistently about the history intimately intertwined with her personal memories, and she writes profusely about Shanghai. Several of her representative works, including Lapse of Time, Brocade Valley, Love on a Barren Mountain, Love in a Small Town, and Song of Everlasting Sorrow, are available in English translations.


  • Julie Ann Ward was born in Oklahoma in 1983. She is an assistant professor of twentieth- and twenty-first-century Latin American literature at the University of Oklahoma. Ward is a 2016-17 recipient of the OU Humanities Forum Fellowship, which supports her research on representations of borders in contemporary Mexican literature.


  • Jesmyn Ward is an American author known best for two novels, Where the Line Bleeds and Salvage the Bones, that are set on the Mississippi coast. She currently teaches at the University of South Alabama.



  • Eleanor Wasserberg (@e_wasserberg) studied at Oxford University and has a creative writing MA from the University of East Anglia. She’s lived in Paris and London and was awarded a writing grant from the UK Arts Council to complete her debut novel, Foxlowe (2017). She now lives in Norwich, UK.


  • Jean-Luc Wauthier (b. 1950) is a Belgian poet, essayist, and editor of the Journal des Poètes.


  • Logan Webb is an art student at the University of Science & Arts of Oklahoma currently studying abroad in Wales.



  • Quinn Carpenter Weedon is an advanced poetry student in Oklahoma City University’s undergraduate English program.


  • Sylvie Weil is the author of several adult and young adult fiction works. Raised in Paris, she has taught French literature at Barnard, Bennington, and Hunter Colleges, and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.


World Literature Today
630 Parrington Oval, Suite 110
Norman, OK 73019-4037
405-325-4531



Updated by World Literature Today: [email protected]