Translators

Browse through all of the translators in WLT.

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  • William Maynard Hutchins, who teaches at Appalachian State University of North Carolina, was educated at Berea, Yale, and the University of Chicago. His translations have appeared in Words Without Borders, InTranslation, and Banipal Magazine of Modern Arabic Literature. He has received two Literary Translation Awards from the National Endowment for the Arts. His most recent translations are The Diesel by Thani Al-Suwaidi, A Land Without Jasmine by Wajdi al-Ahdal, The Grub Hunter by Amir Tag Elsir, and a newly revised translation of Return of the Spirit by Tawfiq al-Hakim.



  • Eric E. Hyett lives in Medford, Massachusetts, and works as a poet and translator. Eric is a member of PoemWorks, the Workshop for Publishing Poets in Boston. His work has recently appeared in the Cincinnati Review, Hudson Review, Barrow Street, Antioch Review, Nimrod, and Harvard Review Online


  • Adriana X. Jacobs is the Cowley Lecturer in modern Hebrew literature at the University of Oxford and specializes in contemporary Israeli poetry and translation. She is completing her first book, Strange Cocktail: Poetics and Practices of Translation in Modern Hebrew Poetry.



  • Elisabeth Jaquette is a translator from Arabic whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian, and elsewhere. Her first novel-length translation, Basma Abdel Aziz’s The Queue, received an English PEN Translation Award. She was also a CASA Fellow at the American University of Cairo.



  • Bill Johnston is professor of comparative literature at Indiana University. He is one of the most prolific translators of Polish literature into English. His work has received the Found in Translation Award, the PEN Translation Prize, the Best Translated Book Award, the Transatlantyk Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and numerous other honors.



  • Photo by Cybele Knowles

    Fady Joudah has three poetry collections and four of poetry in translation from the Arabic. He is the recipient of the Yale Series prize, the Griffin Poetry Prize, and a Guggenheim fellowship.


  • Mohammed Kadalah has most recently published translations and short prose in Lyrikline and in the anthology Voices of the Arab Spring. Born and raised in Syria, he currently teaches Arabic at the University of Connecticut.


  • Jesse Lee Kercheval’s poetry collections include Dog Angel (University of Pittsburgh Press) and World as Dictionary (Carnegie Mellon University Press). In May 2015 Editorial Yaugarú in Uruguay published her bilingual poetry collection Extranjera / Stranger. Her translations of the Uruguayan poet Circe Maia have appeared in such magazines as The New Yorker, Boston Review, and American Poetry Review. The University of Pittsburgh Press will publish Invisible Bridge / El puente invisible: Selected Poems of Circe Maia in August 2015. Kercheval is also the editor of América invertida: An Anthology of Younger Uruguayan Poets, which is forthcoming from the University of New Mexico Press. She is the Zona Gale Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin–Madison where she also directs the Program in Creative Writing


  • Sara Khalili is a financial journalist, editor, and translator of contemporary Iranian literature. She won a 2007 PEN Translation Fund Grant for her translation from the Farsi of Seasons of Purgatory, a selection of short stories by Iranian writer Shahriar Mandanipour.


  • Soo Y. Kim is Assistant Professor of English at Kookmin University, Seoul, South Korea. Kim's research and teaching areas are post–1945 British fiction, world literature, and theory. 



  • Photo by Paul Brannan

    Katie King (doolittleproject.wordpress.com) is an award-winning journalist and literary translator currently working on a PhD in Hispanic studies at the University of Washington in Seattle.


  • Neal Koga translates short stories and poetry from German, Persian, and Turkish, and works freelance as a manuscript editor. His translation of Galsan Tschinag’s “The Swan Song of a Departing People” appears in the March 2015 print edition of WLT. He also composes and publishes songs under the name Jamal.



  • Photo: Debbi Cooper

    Ilana Kurshan is the author of If All the Seas Were Ink, a memoir about Talmud study published by St. Martin’s Press (2017). She lives in Jerusalem and works as an editor and translator.


  • Jane Lee (b. 1974, Seoul) graduated from Queens College, City University of New York, with a bachelor’s degree in English. She has been working as a professional translator for over ten years. Passion for Korean literature and love of writing drove her to study literary translation at the Korea Language Translation Institute in 2010 and 2011. Now residing back in South Korea, she is currently studying Korean writers and their works and writing her own short stories.


  • Rika Lesser, twice the recipient of translation prizes from the Swedish Academy, is the author of four books of poems and seven books of poetry in translation. She resides in Brooklyn, N.Y.


  • Dong Li was born and raised in P.R. China. He is German Chancellor Fellow with the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (2015–2016) as well as Literature Fellow at Akademie Schloss Solitude (2015–2017). He was Colgate University’s Olive B. O’Connor Poet-in-Residence (2013–2014). His honors include fellowships from Yaddo, Vermont Studio Center, Millay Colony, the PEN/Heim Translation Fund, and elsewhere. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Kenyon Review, Conjunctions, Black Warrior Review, Guernica, Cincinnati Review, manuskripte (Austria, in German translation), and others.


  • Andrea Lingenfelter is the award-winning translator of The Kite Family, by Hong Kong writer Hon Lai Chu, The Changing Room: Selected Poetry of Zhai Yongming, the novels Farewell My Concubine and Candy, poetry by many modern and contemporary Sinophone writers, and subtitles for several films. She is currently translating Wang Anyi’s historical novel Scent of Heaven for Penguin. 


  • Marit MacArthur is an associate professor of English at CSU Bakersfield and recently earned an MFA in poetry from Warren Wilson College. Her translations, poems, and reviews have appeared in American Poetry Review, Verse, Southwest Review, Yale Review, ZYZZYVA, and Airplane Reading, among other journals.


  • Aditi Machado is a writer and translator from Bangalore, India. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Denver.



  • Carolann Caviglia Madden’s work has appeared in Women in Clothes (Penguin, 2014), Souvenir, Yalobusha Review, and elsewhere. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Houston.



  • Alison Mandaville is a poet and assistant professor of literature and English education at California State University.


  • Cecile Inglessis Margellosis a translator from French, English, and ancient Greek; a scholar; and a literary critic. She divides her time between Geneva and Athens.



  • Patricia Marsh is a writer of fiction and nonfiction, author of The Scribe of the Soul and The Enigma of the Margate Shell Grotto, and translator of a number of plays and poems from Macedonian into English. She lectured in English at the University of Skopje for a long period before returning to live and work in the UK in 1992.


  • David McDuff (b. 1945) is a British literary translator and editor. His translations include works of nineteenth-century Russian fiction in Penguin Classics (Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Leskov) as well as nineteenth- and twentieth-century Scandinavian poetry and prose.


  • Jamie McKendrick has published five books of poetry, most recently Crocodiles and Obelisks (2008). He edited The Faber Book of 20th-Century Italian Poems, and his translation of Valerio Magrelli's poems, The Embrace (2009; released in the US under the title Vanishing Points), won the Oxford-Weidenfeld Prize and the John Florio Prize. His previous translations published in WLT include Magrelli's "The Duck-Hare Individual" (November 2009) and Antonella Anedda's "Archipelago (a collapse)" (July 2011).


  • Qalandar Bux Memon lives in Lahore, where he is assistant professor in the political science department of Forman Christian College. He is editor of Naked Punch Review, an interdisciplinary poetry, art, politics, and philosophy magazine run by a collective of activists and writers, and founding member of Cafe Bol, an intellectual café based in Lahore that holds regular political, poetic, and philosophical gatherings.


  • An Ethiopian musician, Jorga Mesfin is the founder of the Ethio-jazz group Wudasse and composed the score to Haile Gerima’s epic movie Teza, for which he won the award for Best Music Selection at the twenty-second Carthage Film Festival and Best Composer Award at the fifth Dubai International Film Festival.



  • A lecturer in the Department of English at Babes-University, Cluj, Romania, Erika Mihálycsa has translated William H. Gass, Jeanette Winterson, Julian Barnes, George Orwell, and others into Hungarian and regularly contributes to several literary publications. Two of her translations into English were among WLT’s 2015 Pushcart nominations.


  • Christina Miller is a doctoral candidate at the University of Oklahoma. She works primarily on contemporary Latin American prose, specializing in detective fiction.



  • Derek Mong is the author of two full-length collections, Other Romes (2011) and The Identity Thief (2018), as well as a chapbook of Latin adaptations.