Translators

Browse through all of the translators in WLT.

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  • Photo: Sarah Grew

    Amalia Gladhart is the translator of Trafalgar (2013), by Angélica Gorodischer, and of two novels by Alicia Yánez Cossío. Her short fiction has appeared in Saranac Review, The Fantasist, Atticus Review, and elsewhere. Recipient of an NEA Translation Fellowship, she is Professor of Spanish at the University of Oregon.



  • Adam J. Goldwyn is an assistant professor of medieval literature and English at North Dakota State University. His most recent book, Byzantine Ecocriticism: Women, Nature and Power in the Medieval Greek Romance, was recently published in Palgrave Macmillan’s New Middle Ages Series.


  • Carolyn González is an assistant professor of Spanish at the College of Idaho focusing on the study of Mexican and US Latino/a literature. She earned her PhD in Hispanic languages and literatures from the University of California, Los Angeles.



  • Brad Gooch is a poet, novelist, and biographer whose most recent book is Rumi’s Secret: The Life of the Sufi Poet of Love. His previous books include the memoir Smash Cut and the biographies Flannery and City Poet. He is the recipient of Guggenheim and NEH fellowships and lives in New York City.


  • Anita Gopalan is a 2016 PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grant recipient. Her translations find place in Poetry International Rotterdam, MPT, Drunken Boat, Mantis, International Poetry Review, and elsewhere. 



  • photo: alison harris

    Marilyn Hacker is the author of thirteen books of poems, including A Stranger’s Mirror: New and Selected Poems, 1994–2014 (2015) and sixteen books of poetry translations from the French, most recently A Handful of Blue Earth, by Vénus Khoury-Ghata (2017).



  • Luke Hankins is a poet, editor, and translator. His latest book is The Work of Creation: Selected Prose, and a volume of his translations from the French of Stella Vinitchi Radulescu, A Cry in the Snow and Other Poems, is forthcoming from Seagull Books.


  • Yasmeen Hanoosh is an Iraqi-born literary translator and Assistant Professor of Arabic language and literature at Portland State University. Her translations have appeared in various literary journals and publications, including Banipal and the Iowa Review. Her translation of the Iraqi novel Scattered Crumbs(al-Ramli) won the Arkansas Arabic Translation Prize in 2002, and has been excerpted in Literature from the Axis of Evil: Writing from Iran, Iraq, North Korea and Other Enemy Nations (2006). Her translation of Luay Hamza Abbas’s collection of short stories, Closing His Eyes, received the NEA translation prize in 2010.


  • Jonathan Harrington is a graduate of the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. His translation of Feliciano Sánchez Chan’s book Ukp’éel wayak’ (Seven Dreams) was published by New Native Press in 2014 (see WLT, Sept. 2014, 90). His own The Traffic of Our Lives won the Ledge Press Poetry Prize. He has lived in Yucatán, México, since 2002.



  • Kevin Haworth is the author of four books, including the essay collection Famous Drownings in Literary History. The director of the low-residency MFA program at Carlow University in Pittsburgh, he is at work on Rutu Modan: War, Love, and Secrets, a study of Israel’s leading graphic novelist.


  • Kathleen Heil’s stories, poems, essays, and translations have appeared in journals such as Guernica, Pear Noir!, Michigan Quarterly Review, Diagram, Gigantic, and The Barcelona Review



  • Photo by Laura Hernandez

    George Henson’s translations have appeared variously in Words Without Borders, The Kenyon Review, Asymptote, and World Literature Today, where he is a contributing editor. Most recently, Deep Vellum Publishing released his translation of Sergio Pitol’s The Magician of Vienna.



  • Paul Holzman is a North American writer, translator, and musician living in Buenos Aires. He is currently translating Kike’s novel Que de lejos parecen moscas and investigating the mysterious Argentine composer Guindowsky. He can be read or heard at goodairyanki.blogspot.com.ar


  • William Maynard Hutchins, who teaches at Appalachian State University of North Carolina, was educated at Berea, Yale, and the University of Chicago. His translations have appeared in Words Without Borders, InTranslation, and Banipal Magazine of Modern Arabic Literature. He has received two Literary Translation Awards from the National Endowment for the Arts. His most recent translations are The Diesel by Thani Al-Suwaidi, A Land Without Jasmine by Wajdi al-Ahdal, The Grub Hunter by Amir Tag Elsir, and a newly revised translation of Return of the Spirit by Tawfiq al-Hakim.



  • Eric E. Hyett lives in Medford, Massachusetts, and works as a poet and translator. Eric is a member of PoemWorks, the Workshop for Publishing Poets in Boston. His work has recently appeared in the Cincinnati Review, Hudson Review, Barrow Street, Antioch Review, Nimrod, and Harvard Review Online


  • Adriana X. Jacobs is the Cowley Lecturer in modern Hebrew literature at the University of Oxford and specializes in contemporary Israeli poetry and translation. She is completing her first book, Strange Cocktail: Poetics and Practices of Translation in Modern Hebrew Poetry.



  • Elisabeth Jaquette is a translator from Arabic whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the Guardian, and elsewhere. Her first novel-length translation, Basma Abdel Aziz’s The Queue, received an English PEN Translation Award. She was also a CASA Fellow at the American University of Cairo.



  • Bill Johnston is professor of comparative literature at Indiana University. He is one of the most prolific translators of Polish literature into English. His work has received the Found in Translation Award, the PEN Translation Prize, the Best Translated Book Award, the Transatlantyk Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and numerous other honors.



  • Photo by Cybele Knowles

    Fady Joudah has three poetry collections and four of poetry in translation from the Arabic. He is the recipient of the Yale Series prize, the Griffin Poetry Prize, and a Guggenheim fellowship.


  • Mohammed Kadalah has most recently published translations and short prose in Lyrikline and in the anthology Voices of the Arab Spring. Born and raised in Syria, he currently teaches Arabic at the University of Connecticut.



  • Photo by Natasha Sajé

    Lisa Katz, editor of the Israeli pages of the Poetry International Rotterdam Web, was translator in residence at the University of Iowa in fall 2017.



  • Photo: Denise Noone

    Catherine Kedala specializes in film studies and literature of the twentieth century and teaches Italian language and literature. She received a Global Citizen Award in 2014 and the 2017 Excellence in Teaching Award from the University of Connecticut.


  • Jesse Lee Kercheval’s poetry collections include Dog Angel (University of Pittsburgh Press) and World as Dictionary (Carnegie Mellon University Press). In May 2015 Editorial Yaugarú in Uruguay published her bilingual poetry collection Extranjera / Stranger. Her translations of the Uruguayan poet Circe Maia have appeared in such magazines as The New Yorker, Boston Review, and American Poetry Review. The University of Pittsburgh Press will publish Invisible Bridge / El puente invisible: Selected Poems of Circe Maia in August 2015. Kercheval is also the editor of América invertida: An Anthology of Younger Uruguayan Poets, which is forthcoming from the University of New Mexico Press. She is the Zona Gale Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin–Madison where she also directs the Program in Creative Writing


  • Sara Khalili is a financial journalist, editor, and translator of contemporary Iranian literature. She won a 2007 PEN Translation Fund Grant for her translation from the Farsi of Seasons of Purgatory, a selection of short stories by Iranian writer Shahriar Mandanipour.


  • Soo Y. Kim is Assistant Professor of English at Kookmin University, Seoul, South Korea. Kim's research and teaching areas are post–1945 British fiction, world literature, and theory. 



  • Photo by Paul Brannan

    Katie King (doolittleproject.wordpress.com) is an award-winning journalist and literary translator currently working on a PhD in Hispanic studies at the University of Washington in Seattle.


  • Neal Koga translates short stories and poetry from German, Persian, and Turkish, and works freelance as a manuscript editor. His translation of Galsan Tschinag’s “The Swan Song of a Departing People” appears in the March 2015 print edition of WLT. He also composes and publishes songs under the name Jamal.



  • Photo by Diana Tyszko

    Christina E. Kramer is a professor at the University of Toronto. She is the author of numerous books on the Macedonian language and the Balkans and a translator of Macedonian literature: Freud’s Sister, by Goce Smilevski; My Father’s Books, The Time of the Goats, and The Path of the Eels by Luan Starova; and A Spare Life, by Lidija Dimkovska.


  • Denise Kripper is a literary translator from Buenos Aires. She holds a PhD in literature and cultural studies from Georgetown University and is now an assistant professor of Latin American literature and translation at Lake Forest College.



  • Photo: Debbi Cooper

    Ilana Kurshan is the author of If All the Seas Were Ink, a memoir about Talmud study published by St. Martin’s Press (2017). She lives in Jerusalem and works as an editor and translator.


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