Translators

Browse through all of the translators in WLT.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

  • Carol Rose Little is an assistant professor of linguistics at the University of Oklahoma. She has been working in Ch’ol communities in Chiapas, Mexico, since 2015. Her translations of Ch’ol poetry with Charlotte Friedman have been published in Exchanges, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and elsewhere.



  • Anni Liu was born in Xi’an, in Sha’anxi Province. Her other translations of Du Ya’s poems can be found in Columbia Journal, Two Lines, the Asymptote blog, and elsewhere. Her debut poetry collection, Border Vista (Persea, 2022), received the 2021 Lexi Rudnitsky Prize, and she has been awarded fellowships from Undocupoets and the American Literary Translators Association. She holds an MFA from Indiana University and works at Graywolf Press.



  • Hanoch Livneh is a native of Israel (born in Jerusalem). He moved to the United States in 1972 and, prior to retiring in 2013, served as a professor and coordinator of the Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling Program at Portland State University. He lives in Beaverton, Oregon. 



  • Jennifer Lobaugh is an American poet and translator. Her work has appeared in such journals as The Southampton Review and New Poetry in Translation.



  • Jacqueline Loss, professor of Latin American literature at the University of Connecticut, is the author of Dreaming in Russian: The Cuban Soviet Imaginary and translator of Jorge Mañach’s An Inquiry into Choteo.



  • Olivia Lott’s translations of Colombian poetry have appeared most recently in Mantis, Río Grande Review, Spoon River Poetry Review, Tupelo Quarterly, and Waxwing.



  • El Habib Louai is a Moroccan poet, translator, musician, and assistant professor of English at Ibn Zohr University in Agadir, Morocco. His articles, poems, and Arabic translations of Beat writers appear in many literary magazines, journals, and reviews.


  • Marit MacArthur is an associate professor of English at CSU Bakersfield and recently earned an MFA in poetry from Warren Wilson College. Her translations, poems, and reviews have appeared in American Poetry Review, Verse, Southwest Review, Yale Review, ZYZZYVA, and Airplane Reading, among other journals.


  • Aditi Machado is a writer and translator from Bangalore, India. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Denver.



  • Jamie Mackay is a writer and translator based in Florence. His work has appeared in the Guardian, TLS, WLT, Frieze, and elsewhere. He writes the popular newsletter “The Week in Italy” and is the author of The Invention of Sicily (2021).



  • Carolann Caviglia Madden’s work has appeared in Women in Clothes (Penguin, 2014), Souvenir, Yalobusha Review, and elsewhere. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Houston.



  • Gulzamira Mambetalieva is a senior English lecturer at Kyrgyz National Balasagyn University in Bishkek. An active translator of Kyrgyz, Russian, and English literature, she is the author of A Path from the Village (Bishkek Press, 2012) and Glossary of Psycholinguistic and Neurolinguistic Terms and Interpretations: Essays and Extracts (Bishkek Press, 2013), and the compiler of Munur Mambetaliev: Honest as the Spirit (Uluu Toolor Press, 2015), the collected poems of Munur Mambetaliev.



  • Alison Mandaville is a poet and associate professor of English at Fresno State University.



  • Mattho Mandersloot is a translator with a wide interest in literature; he reads Dutch, English, French, Latin, Greek, and Korean. As a classics undergraduate, he wrote on the translation issues of rendering Horace’s Odes in Korean. Currently based in London, he is enrolled in the MA Translation program at SOAS while working on his first novel-length translation of Korean fiction.



  • After a career in international law, Amir Marashi decided to pursue his first love, literature. In addition to a collection of his own short stories, he has published an anthology of short stories by contemporary Iranian women writers as well as translations of several classical and modern Iranian works. 


  • Cecile Inglessis Margellosis a translator from French, English, and ancient Greek; a scholar; and a literary critic. She divides her time between Geneva and Athens.



  • Patricia Marsh is a writer of fiction and nonfiction, author of The Scribe of the Soul and The Enigma of the Margate Shell Grotto, and translator of a number of plays and poems from Macedonian into English. She lectured in English at the University of Skopje for a long period before returning to live and work in the UK in 1992.



  • Patricia Marsh-Stefanovska is a writer of fiction and nonfiction, author of The Scribe of the Soul and The Enigma of the Margate Shell Grotto, and translator of a number of plays and poems from Macedonian into English. She lectured in English at the University of Skopje for a long period before returning to live and work in the UK in 1992.



  • Morelia Vázquez Martínez is a Ch’ol translator from El Campanario, Chiapas, Mexico. Since 2015, she has been working on language documentation projects with her native language, Ch’ol. She has a bachelor’s degree in food engineering.



  • Mattawa Photo © Khairy Shaaban

    Khaled Mattawa is the author of six volumes of poetry, most recently Fugitive Atlas (2020; see WLT, Winter 2021, 76). A MacArthur Fellow, he teaches at the University of Michigan and edits Michigan Quarterly Review. His translation of Saadi Youssef’s selected poems, Without an Alphabet, Without a Face, won the PEN American Center Poetry Translation Prize in 2003.



  • Derick Mattern is a poet and translator living in Iowa City. A former BCLT mentee, he is now an Iowa Arts Fellow and 2018 NEA Literary Translation Fellow at the Iowa Translation Workshop.



  • Kit Maude is a translator based in Buenos Aires. He has translated dozens of classic and contemporary Latin American writers and writes reviews and criticism for several different outlets in Spanish and English.



  • Gretchen McCullough (www.gretchenmccullough.wix.com/gretchenmccullough) is a senior instructor at the American University in Cairo. Her bilingual book of short stories in English and Arabic, Three Stories from Cairo, translated with Mohamed Metwalli, was published in 2011. A story collection, Shahrazad’s Tooth, was published in 2013.


  • David McDuff (b. 1945) is a Scottish translator, editor, and literary critic. His translations include works of nineteenth-century Russian fiction in Penguin Classics and Nordic poetry from Bloodaxe. In 2021 he was honored with the Swedish Academy’s Interpretation Prize (Tolkningspris).


  • Jamie McKendrick has published five books of poetry, most recently Crocodiles and Obelisks (2008). He edited The Faber Book of 20th-Century Italian Poems, and his translation of Valerio Magrelli's poems, The Embrace (2009; released in the US under the title Vanishing Points), won the Oxford-Weidenfeld Prize and the John Florio Prize. His previous translations published in WLT include Magrelli's "The Duck-Hare Individual" (November 2009) and Antonella Anedda's "Archipelago (a collapse)" (July 2011).



  • Karen McNeil’s literary translations have appeared in Banipal, World Literature Today, and al-Jadid. She was revising editor of the Oxford Arabic Dictionary (2014) and is currently a PhD student in Arabic at Georgetown University. 



  • Udit Mehrotra prides himself on his diverse upbringing, which has led to an interest in poetry, food, sports, politics, mathematics, and psychology. Born in Thailand and brought up in Singapore, he studied statistics at the University of Texas and now works in Austin as a data scientist.



  • Valeria Meiller is an assistant professor in social and environmental challenges in Latin America at the University of Texas, San Antonio. She is currently working on her first scholarly manuscript, Necroterritories: Slaughterhouses and the Politics of Death, and is the director of Ruge el Bosque, a project on environmental poetry of Abya Yala / Afro / Latin America. She is the author of the Spanish poetry books El libro de los caballitos, El Recreo, and El mes raro (forthcoming in English as The Odd Month in 2024, translated by Whitney DeVos).


  • Qalandar Bux Memon lives in Lahore, where he is assistant professor in the political science department of Forman Christian College. He is editor of Naked Punch Review, an interdisciplinary poetry, art, politics, and philosophy magazine run by a collective of activists and writers, and founding member of Cafe Bol, an intellectual café based in Lahore that holds regular political, poetic, and philosophical gatherings.


  • An Ethiopian musician, Jorga Mesfin is the founder of the Ethio-jazz group Wudasse and composed the score to Haile Gerima’s epic movie Teza, for which he won the award for Best Music Selection at the twenty-second Carthage Film Festival and Best Composer Award at the fifth Dubai International Film Festival.