Translators

Browse through all of the translators in WLT.

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  • Mark Schafer is a literary translator, teacher, and visual artist who lives in Boston, Massachusetts. Schafer’s most recent work is the bilingual anthology of David Huerta’s poetry, Before Saying Any of the Great Words: Selected Poems (Copper Canyon, 2009). Schafer has translated novels, short stories, essays, and poetry by a wide range of Latin American authors, including Virgilio Piñera, Gloria Gervitz, Alberto Ruy Sánchez, Jesús Gardea, and Antonio José Ponte. He is the recipient of two NEA translation fellowships, the Robert Fitzgerald Translation Prize, and a grant from the Fund for Culture Mexico-USA. More information about Schafer’s translation work can be found at www.beforesaying.com; information about his visual art can be found at www.marksonpaper.us.


  • Roger Sedarat is an Iranian American poet and translator. He is the author of two poetry collections: Dear Regime: Letters to the Islamic Republic and Ghazal Games.


  • Anthony Seidman is a poet and translator residing in Los Angeles. His work has been included in such journals as Chiron Review, Nimrod, World Literature Today, The Black Herald Review, Ambit, Cardinal Points, among other publications. He has a new collection of poetry entitled Cosmic Weather forthcoming from Eyewear. With David Shook, he is the co-translator of Confetti-Ash: Selected Poems by Salvador Novo, to be published later this year by the Bitter Oleander Press.


  • Eric Sellin, professor emeritus at Tulane University (New Orleans), now lives in Philadelphia. His translations have appeared in dozens of journals and anthologies, including New Directions, The Heinemann Book of African Women’s Poetry, and The Literary Review. A frequent contributor to WLT, Sellin also served on the jury for the 1984 Neustadt Prize.


  • David Shook is a contributing editor to World Literature Today. He’s currently translating Lima’s selected works in Los Angeles, where he is editor of Phoneme Media.


  • Antony Shugaar is a prolific translator, with new novels by Silvia Avallone, Gianrico Carofiglio, Diego De Silva, Giorgio Faletti, Gianni Rodari, and Paolo Sorrentino forthcoming in 2011. The recipient of a 2007 NEA translation fellowship, he is also the author of I Lie for a Living and Coast to Coast, and the coauthor of Latitude Zero: Tales of the Equator. His essay “Darkness at the Heart of Recent Italian Literature” appears in the July 2011 issue of WLT.


  • Daniel Simon is a poet, translator, and the editor in chief of World Literature Today. His newest book project, Nebraska Poetry: A Sesquicentennial Anthology, 1867–2017, which he compiled and edited, was published in April 2017.



  • Kalpna Singh-Chitnis is the author of Bare Soul (winner of the 2017 Naji Naaman Literary Award) and three collections of poems in Hindi. She received the prestigious Bihar Rajbhasha Award given by the government of Bihar, India, for her first poetry collection, Chand Ka Paivand (Patch of moon), in 1987, and the title of Bihar Shri (Jewel of Bihar) in 1988. She is also the recipient of 2014 Rajiv Gandhi Global Excellence Award for her contributions to literature and cinema.


  • Arunava Sinha is a translator of classic and contemporary Bengali fiction. His published translations include Sankar’s Chowringhee and The Middleman; Buddhadeva Bose’s My Kind of Girl; and Moti Nandy’s Striker, Stopper. Born and brought up in Calcutta, he now lives in New Delhi.



  • Brian Sneeden’s first collection of poems, Last City, is forthcoming from Carnegie Mellon University Press (2018). His poems and translations have appeared in Asymptote, Beloit Poetry Journal, Harvard Review, TriQuarterly, Virginia Quarterly Review, and other publications, and translations of his poetry have been published in Greek, Albanian, and Serbian. His translation of Phoebe Giannisi’s collection, Homerica, is forthcoming from the inaugural series of World Poetry Books (2017).


  • Karina Sotnik was born in Riga in 1965. In addition to her translation activity, she works in the high-tech industry as a consultant for international business development. She also imports linen products from the Baltic region to the United States and designed her own line of children's bed linens, Linu Baby.


  • Mbarek Sryfi is a lecturer in Arabic at the University of Pennsylvania where he is completing a PhD in modern Arabic literature. He is also an adjunct assistant professor at Mercer County Community College in New Jersey and currently is a visiting lecturer at Swarthmore College. His translations from the Arabic have appeared in CELAAN Review and Metamorphoses.


  • Ilan Stavans is Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College and publisher of Restless Books. His latest books are I Love My Selfie (Duke, with Adál) and Quixote: The Novel and the World (Norton). He has translated into English the poetry of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Rubén Darío, Jorge Luis Borges, and Pablo Neruda, among others. He is also the editor of The FSG Book of Twentieth-Century Latin American Poetry (2011).


  • S. Melissa Steinhardt, instructor of English at Hillsborough Community College (Tampa, Florida), is currently researching Afro-Cuban culture to facilitate her English translation of Lydia Cabrera’s El Monte.



  • Emma Suleiman is an international communications consultant with twelve years’ experience managing global communication strategies. She advises newly established nonprofits to support the creation and implementation of their communications strategies to local communities and to an international audience.



  • Kim Sunghyun is a South Korean poet and professor. His Korean poetry books include Metropolis, Metropolis 2, and Metropolis 3.



  • Dominic Thomas is Madeleine L. Letessier Professor and chair of the Department of French and Francophone Studies at UCLA. He is the author or co-author of numerous books including Black France (2007), Africa and France (2013), Colonial Culture in France since the Revolution (2014), The Invention of Race (2014), and Vers la guerre des identités (2016). He is the editor of the Global African Voices series at Indiana University Press.


  • Max Thompson is an MFA student of translation at the University of Arkansas. His work has appeared previously in The Alchemy Journal of Translation and Unsplendid.



  • Spencer Thurlow is a poet and writer who grew up on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. He’s currently living in Kochi City, Japan, translating poetry and working as an English teacher with a goal to attain fluency in Japanese. His work has recently appeared in the Worcester Review and Comstock Review as well as Pudding Magazine


  • Valeria Tsygankova is currently doing graduate work in the history of the book at the University of London. In 2011 she graduated with a BA in English from the University of Pennsylvania, where she edited two undergraduate literary magazines and wrote an honors thesis on the publication history of the Bishops' Bible (1568). She is especially interested in contemporary poetry and poetics, twentieth-century Russian writers, translation, and book history.


  • Yi Ungyung is a PhD candidate at Sogang University, Seoul.



  • Pauline Levy Valensi, born in 1994 in France, is currently completing her master’s degree in French language and literature at the University of Connecticut and in general and comparative literature at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle in Paris.



  • Catherine Venner studied German and European studies at the University of Durham (England) and the European University Viadrina in Frankfurt an der Oder (Germany). She has worked as a translator, primarily in the legal and commercial sector, for over eight years.


  • Lawrence Venuti is the author, most recently, of Translation Changes Everything: Theory and Practice (Routledge) and the translator of Ernest Farrés’s Edward Hopper: Poems (Graywolf), which won the Robert Fagles Translation Prize, plus two additional stories by Eduard Màrquez that appear in the January 2014 print edition of WLT. To read Venuti’s essay, “Eduard Màrquez’s Zugzwang: Cosmopolitanism, Minority, Translation,” click here.



  • Shelby Vincent is the managing editor of Translation Review and a lecturer at the University of Texas at Dallas. In her free time, she is a literary translator. Her translation of Carmen Boullosa’s Cielos de la Tierra (Heavens on Earth) is forthcoming from Deep Vellum Publishing.


  • Maya Vinokour is a second-year doctoral student in the Program in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in themes of spectatorship in modern Russian and German literature. Also a translator, Vinokour won Academia Rossica's Young Translator Award in 2011.



  • Julie Ann Ward was born in Oklahoma in 1983. She is an assistant professor of twentieth- and twenty-first-century Latin American literature at the University of Oklahoma. 


  • Steven F. White is finishing an ecocritical study of Nicaraguan poetry. He translated Seven Trees against the Dying Light by Pablo Antonio Cuadra and The Angel of Rain by Cuban Gastón Baquero and is the co-author of Ayahuasca Reader. His most recent book of poetry is Bajo la palabra de las plantas (poesía selecta: 1979–2009). He teaches Latin American lierature at St. Lawrence University.


  • Tegan White-Nesbitt is an Alaskan artist from Fairbanks. She met Walle Sayer as book, then man, while studying linguistics at the Eberhard-Karls University in Tübingen.