Translators

Browse through all of the translators in WLT.

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  • Michael M. Naydan is Woskob Family Professor of Ukrainian Studies and a prolific translator from Ukrainian and Russian. He is currently in the process of compiling an anthology of contemporary Ukrainian women writers and is completing a translation of Iren Rozdobudko’s novel The Button with Olha Tytarenko. His essay on Ukrainian literary identity after the Orange Revolution appeared in the September 2005 issue of WLT.


  • Denise Newman is a translator and a poet who has published three collections of poetry. She has translated two books by Denmark’s greatest modernist author, Inger Christensen, and her work has appeared widely, including in Denver Quarterly, Volt, Fence, New American Writing, and ZYZZYVA.


  • Katalin Orbán is a scholar and translator who writes about graphic narratives, cultural memory, and changing modes of reading. Her works have appeared in Critical Inquiry, Representations, and other journals. 


  • Eugene Ostashevsky is a master teacher in the Liberal Studies Program at New York University. He has published two books of poetry with Ugly Duckling Presse: Iterature and The Life and Opinions of DJ Spinoza. His work as translator includes OBERIU: An Anthology of Russian Absurdism (2006), a selection of 1930s underground writings by Alexander Vvedensky, Daniil Kharms, and others in their circle.


  • José Emilio Pacheco is a Mexican author, poet, and translator. His poetry and literature have earned a number of prestigious awards, such as the Miguel de Cervantes prize recognizing lifetime achievement in Spanish language literature. Pacheco has taught at several universities in Mexico and the United States, and he is a member of the Mexican Academy of Language and the National College.


  • Viorica Patea is associate professor of American literature at the University of Salamanca and has published books on American poetry and modernism.


  • Bob Perelman is a poet and Associate Chair of the English Department at the University of Pennsylvania. He has published over fifteen volumes of poetry, most recently Iflife (2006) and Ten to One: Selected Poems (1999). His critical books are The Marginalization of Poetry: Language Writing and Literary History (1996) and The Trouble with Genius: Reading Pound, Joyce, Stein, and Zukofsky (1994). He has edited Writing/Talks (1985), a collection of talks by poets.



  • Photo by Margaret Snead

    Kerri Pierce has translated fiction and nonfiction from seven languages. Her translation of The Faster I Walk, the Smaller I Am, by Kjersti A. Skmosvold, was a finalist for the International Dublin Literary Award.


  • Marta Pilarska works in film and theater in her hometown of Łódź, Poland.



  • Kevin M. F. Platt is chair of the Program in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory at the University of Pennsylvania. He works on Russian poetry, representations of Russian history, Russian historiography, and history and memory in Russia. His most recent book is Terror and Greatness: Ivan and Peter as Russian Myths (Cornell University Press, 2011). He also edited and contributed translations to Modernist Archaist: Selected Poems by Osip Mandelstam (Whale and Star, 2008).


  • Jacquelyn Pope’s first collection of poems, Watermark, was published by Marsh Hawk Press; Hungerpots, her translation of the Dutch poet Hester Knibbe, was published by Eyewear. She is the recipient of a 2015 NEA Translation Fellowship and a 2012 PEN/Heim Translation Fund grant.


  • Jean-Jacques Poucel is the author of Jacques Roubaud and the Invention of Memory (2006) and has written articles on the Oulipo, some of which appear in Pereckonings (Yale French Studies 105), Constrainted Writing I & II (Poetics Today 30.4 & 31.1), and in the Oulipo dossier at www.DrunkenBoat.com (issue 8). His translations of Emmanuel Hocquard's Conditions of Light (2010) and Anne Portugal's Flirt Formula (2012) have both been published by La Presse (Fence Books). In 2011–2012 he was a Fellow at the Internationales Kolleg Morphomata, Cologne, Germany. He is currently visiting faculty at the University of Calgary and at the University of Paris VII–Denis Diderot. 


  • Iqbal Qaisar is a historian and Punjabi poet. He has published two books of poetry and six nonfiction books in Punjabi and two books of history in Urdu. He is the director of Punjabi Kohj Garh, an institute promoting research in Punjabi history and culture.


  • Mahmud Rahman is a Bangladeshi writer and translator now based in California. His collection of stories Killing the Water appeared in 2010, and his translation of Mahmudul Haque’s Black Ice appeared in 2012. His article "Pulp Fiction in Bangladesh: Super Spies and Transplant Authors" appeared in the May 2008 issue of WLT.


  • Margaret Randall (b. 1936, New York) is a poet, essayist, oral historian, translator, photographer, and social activist. She lived in Latin America for twenty-three years (in Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua). From 1962 to 1969 she and Mexican poet Sergio Mondragón co-edited El Corno Emplumado / The Plumed Horn, a bilingual literary quarterly that published some of the best new work of the sixties. When she came home in 1984, the government ordered her deported because it found some of her writing to be “against the good order and happiness of the United States.” With the support of many writers and others, she won her case in 1989. Randall’s most recent poetry titles include As If the Empty Chair / Como si la silla vacia, The Rhizome as a Field of Broken Bones, About Little Charlie Lindbergh, and She Becomes Time (all from Wings Press). Haydée Santamaría, Cuban Revolutionary: She Led By Transgression (2015) and Exporting Revolution: Cuba’s Global Solidarity (2017) were published by Duke. Randall has also devoted herself to translation, producing When Rains Become Floods, by Lurgio Galván Sánchez, and Only the Road / Solo el Camino, an anthology of eight decades of Cuban poetry (both also published by Duke). Randall lives in New Mexico with her partner (now wife) of more than thirty years, the painter Barbara Byers, and travels extensively to read, lecture, and teach.



  • At any given moment, words in three different languages were heard around the dinner table in writer Kristina Zdravič Reardon’s childhood. She finds that translating literature from her grandparents’ native Slovene and Spanish to English is a challenging—yet somehow natural—pursuit. Reardon holds an MFA from the University of New Hampshire and has been awarded a Fulbright translation grant and a summer fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities.


  • Jamie Richards, currently a doctoral candidate in comparative literature at the University of Oregon, is the translator of several literary works from Italian, including Giancarlo Pastore's Jellyfish (2008), Nicolai Lilin's Free Fall (forthcoming in 2011), and Giovanni Orelli's Walaschek's Dream (forthcoming in 2012).


  • Wendell Ricketts is the editor of Everything I Have Is Blue: Short Fiction by Working-Class Men about More-or-Less Gay Life. His fiction has appeared in Mississippi Review, Salt Hill, Blue Mesa Review, and The Long Story, among others. He holds a degree in creative writing from the University of New Mexico and has worked as a translator from Italian since 1998; his translation of the plays of Natalia Ginzburg, The Wrong Door, was published by the University of Toronto Press.


  • Peter Robinson (b. 1953) is Professor of English and American Literature at the University of Reading (UK). Among his many volumes of poetry, translation and literary criticism are Selected Poems (2003), The Look of Goodbye: Poems 2001–2006 (2008), Selected Poetry and Prose of Vittorio Sereni (2006), The Greener Meadow: Selected Poems of Luciano Erba (2007), winner of the John Florio Prize, Poetry & Translation: The Art of the Impossible (2010), and Antonia Pozzi, Poems (2011).


  • Lola Rogers is a freelance literary translator living in Seattle. She has translated ten novels, including Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen’s The Rabbit Back Literature Society (Lumikko ja yhdeksän muuta) for Pushkin Press (2015), and contributed translations of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to a variety of journals and anthologies.


  • Zack Rogow is the author, editor, or translator of twenty books and plays. His most recent publications include a chapbook of songs about jazz and pop singers, Voices Carved from Obsidian, from Deconstructed Artichoke Press; and a volume of poetry, My Mother and the Ceiling Dancers


  • Elazar Tal Ronen is a prolific musician, lyricist, and songwriter. A graduate with honors of CCNY in 2009, Ronen is a prominent member of the New York jazz scene. As a songwriter and lyricist, he’s collaborated on internationally praised albums.



  • Photo by Jamie Borland

    Mira Rosenthal is the author of The Local World and translator of two books by Polish poet Tomasz Różycki. Her work has received numerous awards, including an NEA Fellowship, a Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University, a PEN/Heim Translation Grant, and the Northern California Book Award. She is assistant professor of poetry writing at Cal Poly.


  • N. Harry Rothschild is a professor of Chinese history at the University of North Florida. His work focuses on China’s first and only female emperor, Wu Zhao.


  • Stephanie Sandler is Professor of Slavic languages and literatures at Harvard University. Her most recent critical monograph was Commemorating Pushkin: Russia's Myth of a National Poet (2004). She has edited several collections of essays, including Rereading Russian Poetry (1999). Sandler collaborated with Genya Turovskaya in translating The Russian Version: Selected Poems of Elena Fanailova (2009) and is currently working on a book about contemporary Russian poetry.


  • Mark Schafer is a literary translator, teacher, and visual artist who lives in Boston, Massachusetts. Schafer’s most recent work is the bilingual anthology of David Huerta’s poetry, Before Saying Any of the Great Words: Selected Poems (Copper Canyon, 2009). Schafer has translated novels, short stories, essays, and poetry by a wide range of Latin American authors, including Virgilio Piñera, Gloria Gervitz, Alberto Ruy Sánchez, Jesús Gardea, and Antonio José Ponte. He is the recipient of two NEA translation fellowships, the Robert Fitzgerald Translation Prize, and a grant from the Fund for Culture Mexico-USA. More information about Schafer’s translation work can be found at www.beforesaying.com; information about his visual art can be found at www.marksonpaper.us.


  • Roger Sedarat is an Iranian American poet and translator. He is the author of two poetry collections: Dear Regime: Letters to the Islamic Republic and Ghazal Games.


  • Anthony Seidman is a poet and translator residing in Los Angeles. His work has been included in such journals as Chiron Review, Nimrod, World Literature Today, The Black Herald Review, Ambit, Cardinal Points, among other publications. He has a new collection of poetry entitled Cosmic Weather forthcoming from Eyewear. With David Shook, he is the co-translator of Confetti-Ash: Selected Poems by Salvador Novo, to be published later this year by the Bitter Oleander Press.


  • Eric Sellin, professor emeritus at Tulane University (New Orleans), now lives in Philadelphia. His translations have appeared in dozens of journals and anthologies, including New Directions, The Heinemann Book of African Women’s Poetry, and The Literary Review. A frequent contributor to WLT, Sellin also served on the jury for the 1984 Neustadt Prize.


  • David Shook is a contributing editor to World Literature Today. He’s currently translating Lima’s selected works in Los Angeles, where he is editor of Phoneme Media.


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