Translators

Browse through all of the translators in WLT.

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  • Photo by Luisa Leme

    Eric M. B. Becker is an award-winning literary translator and journalist and editor of Words Without Borders. In 2014 he earned a PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grant for his translation of a short-story collection by Mia Couto. In 2016 he earned a Fulbright fellowship to translate Brazilian literature. He holds an MFA from Queens College–City University of New York and currently lives in Brazil.



  • Gabriella Bedetti studied translation at the University of Iowa and the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. Her translations of Meschonnic’s essays and other writings have appeared in New Literary History, Critical Inquiry, and Diacritics. Meschonnic was a guest of the MLA at her roundtable with Ralph Cohen and Susan Stewart.



  • Fiona Bell is a literary translator and scholar of russophone literature. Her translation of Stories, by Nataliya Meshchaninova, received a 2020 PEN/Heim Translation Fund grant. Her essays have appeared in Asymptote, the Los Angeles Review of Books, Literary Hub, and elsewhere. She lives in New Haven, Connecticut.



  • John Bengan’s translations of Elizabeth Joy Serrano-Quijano’s work have appeared or are forthcoming in Words Without Borders, Shenandoah, and LIT. He teaches at the University of the Philippines Mindanao. 



  • Manash Firaq Bhattacharjee is a poet, writer, translator, and political science scholar. He is the author of The Town Slowly Empties: On Life and Culture during Lockdown (Headpress, 2021), Looking for the Nation: Towards Another Idea of India (Speaking Tiger, 2018), and Ghalib’s Tomb and Other Poems (The London Magazine, 2013). His writings, apart from regular contributions to The Wire, have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Review of Books, Guernica, World Literature Today, The Hindu, The Indian Express, and Outlook, among others.


  • Julia Bloch is Assistant Professor at the Bard College MAT program in Delano, California, and an editor of the online poetics journal Jacket2. She grew up in northern California and Sydney, Australia, and received her PhD in English literature at the University of Pennsylvania. Her book Letters to Kelly Clarkson is forthcoming from Sidebrow Books; she has published poems recently in Aufgabe, P-Queue, and Peacock Online Review.



  • Sarit Blum has spent her life investigating body-mind techniques. Her fascination lies with the universal chord of human emotion.



  • Don Boes is the author of Good Luck with That, Railroad Crossing, and The Eighth Continent, selected by A. R. Ammons for the Samuel French Morse Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in the Louisville Review, Painted Bride Quarterly, Prairie Schooner, CutBank, Zone 3, Southern Indiana Review, and Cincinnati Review.



  • Philip Bradshaw graduated from the University of Kansas in 2018 with a double major in Chinese language and literature and biochemistry.


  • David Brookshaw is an emeritus professor at the University of Bristol, UK. He has published widely in the field of Brazilian and lusophone postcolonial studies. His translations include, most recently, Mia Couto’s Confession of the Lioness and Pensativities and Other Interinventions: Selected Essays, both forthcoming in spring 2015. His translation of Couto’s “In Some Other Life I Was a Bird” appears on page 53.


  • Susan Brown (b. 1968, New Orleans) is a Paris-based American translator.



  • Sarah Brownsberger’s poetry appears in Field, the Hudson Review, OnEarth, Poetry East, Salamander, and other journals. Her Icelandic-English translations include Sigfús Bjartmarsson’s bestiary, Raptorhood (Uppheimar, 2007); Harpa Árnadóttir’s artist’s diary, June (Crymogea, 2011); critical essays; and fiction and poetry for the unesco Reykjavík Literary City project.



  • During and following her studies in the international BA program in Israel, Anna Burneika assisted theater directors in Ukraine to stage new productions of Arthur Miller’s A View from the Bridge and Simon Stephens’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. She has translated more than 120 stories by Felix Krivin.



  • Photo © Carolyn Forché

    James Byrne is a poet, editor, and translator. His most recent poetry collection is Everything Broken Up Dances (Tupelo, 2015).


  • Naomi Caffee is a PhD candidate in Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is currently writing a doctoral dissertation on the literature of ethnic minorities in the former Soviet Union.



  • Wendy Call is co-editor of the craft anthology Telling True Stories, author of the award-winning book No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy, and translator of Irma Pineda’s In the Belly of Night and Other Poems.


  • Paul-Henri Campbell was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1982. He studied classical Greek and Roman Catholic theology. He is a bilingual poet and translator. His publications include poetry in German and English—most recent are Space Race (2012) and Am Ende der Zeilen (2013).


  • Hélène Cardona is the author of Dreaming My Animal Selves (Salmon Poetry), The Astonished Universe (Red Hen Press), and Life in Suspension (forthcoming from Salmon Poetry in 2016). Her translations include Ce que nous portons (Éditions du Cygne), based on What We Carry, by Dorianne Laux; and Beyond Elsewhere, by Gabriel Arnou-Laujeac (forthcoming from White Pine Press in 2016). She holds a master’s in American literature from the Sorbonne, taught at Hamilton College and LMU, and received fellowships from the Goethe-Institut and Universidad Internacional de Andalucía. She co-edits Dublin Poetry Review, Levure Littéraire, and Fulcrum: An Anthology of Poetry and Aesthetics.



  • Alice-Catherine Carls is Tom Elam Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Tennessee at Martin. An internationally published diplomatic and cultural historian of twentieth-century Europe, she is also a translator and literary critic. She serves on several editorial boards and commissions in the United States and abroad.



  • Nancy Naomi Carlson, poet and translator, received an NEA fellowship to translate Mabanckou’s poetry. The New York Times called her latest collection “new and noteworthy.”



  • Robert Carnevale’s poems have been published widely, including in the Paris Review and the New Yorker. He teaches at Drew in the Arts and Letters program.



  • Keith Cartwright teaches at the University of North Florida and is currently the Fulbright–García Robles US Studies Chair at Universidad de las Américas Puebla. He has published two scholarly monographs and two collections of poetry. His next book—with Dolores Flores-Silva—is titled Cornbread, Quimbombó y Barbacoa: Mexico and the Gulf Shores of Our Souths.


  • Anshuman Chandra composes and performs his own melodies for ghazals, including a recording of this ghazal by Shakeel Badayuni, which can be heard on the WLT website. He is also a member of the South Asian band sifar1. He studied Urdu under Hamida Banu Chopra and has collaborated on translations of the poets Sahir Ludhyanvi, Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Shakeel Badayuni, and Sha’ir Lakhnavi. 



  • Born in China, Y. Elaine Chang has lived in the United States since college. She changed her focus to writing after a decade of work in engineering. Her poems and essays have been published in Chinese, and her translation of a Tibet travelogue appeared in Outside magazine’s China edition.


  • Hamida Banu Chopra teaches Urdu language and literature as a visiting scholar at the Indian Institute of Technology. She has also taught at the University of California, Berkeley, and is an internationally renowned reciter of Urdu poetry. She received her MA in philosophy from Rajasthan University and an advanced degree in Urdu from Aligarh University. Her co-translations of Urdu poetry have appeared in TWO LINES: World Writing in TranslationCircumference, and Born Magazine.


  • Nasreen Chopra is a physicist who has studied Urdu poetry. She is bilingual in English and Urdu. 



  • Alex Cigale’s Russian Absurd: Daniil Kharms, Selected Writings is a Northwestern World Classic. He was awarded a 2015 NEA Literary Translation Fellowship for his work on the St. Petersburg philological school poet Mikhail Eremin.



  • Diana Clarke lives in western Massachusetts. She teaches teenagers, hikes, and works as the copyeditor of In geveb, a new digital journal of Yiddish studies.


  • Lyn Coffin is a widely published poet, translator, playwright, and fiction writer. Her translation of Rustaveli’s The Knight in the Panther Skin will appear in 2015. Her collection of short fiction is about to be published by Iron Twine Press, and a few of her plays will be published by Whale Road Press in 2015. She has published nineteen books. She teaches professional and continuing education at the University of Washington. She has the good sense to recognize Mohsen Emadi as a master and to love him as a brother



  • Photo courtesy of the translator

    Steven Cohen has worked as a translator for more than thirty years and, as a journalist, on the desk of the International Herald Tribune–Haaretz English edition. He currently lives in Hod Hasharon.


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