Translators

Browse through all of the translators in WLT.

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  • Jeon Daye (MA) lives in Seoul and is a freelance translator.


  • Author of critical essays, translations, and poems, Paul Scott Derrick teaches American literature at the University of Valencia in Spain. 



  • Lisa Dillman teaches in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Emory University and translates from the Spanish. She has translated three Yuri Herrera novels, the third of which, Kingdom Cons, will be published in July 2017.


  • Dan Disney teaches twentieth-century poetry at Sogang University, Seoul.



  • Photo by Sydne Gray

    Arthur Dixon works as a translator and as managing editor of WLT’s affiliated journal Latin American Literature Today.


  • Sarah Dowling is the author of Security Posture (2009), which won the Robert Kroetsch Award for Innovative Poetry. Her scholarly work, which has appeared in GLQ and Canadian Literature, concerns contemporary multilingual poetry. A doctoral candidate in the English Department at the University of Pennsylvania, Sarah is international editor of the online poetics journal Jacket2.


  • Thoraya El-Rayyes is a Palestinian-Canadian writer living in Amman, Jordan. Her translations of Arabic short stories have previously appeared in Saint Anne’s Review



  • Ellen Elias-Bursać has been translating essays and fiction by Dubravka Ugrešić and other Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian writers since the 1980s and was a featured panelist at the 2016 Neustadt Festival.


  • Eric Ellingsen uses bio-spaces to squat bio-poems.
    This morning I couldn’t get my bio lines to read rite, so I took a bit out
    of the hand drill and inserted all my two-year-old’s red crayons
    drawing the red line. Then I went upstairs and read, instead
    of “state,” let us all be heads of lettuce, drawing on Khlebnikov.
    Whatever you throw into the eternal circumstance, have a good time.



  • Vanessa Falco is a poet and translator of Korean poetry. Her work has appeared in Poetry International, Smartish Pace, and Enizagam, and she was awarded a Norman Mailer Poetry Fellowship.


  • Meng Fanjun is director of the International Association of Comparative Cultural Studies and a professor at Southwestern University’s College of International Studies in Chongqing, China.


  • Nicole Fares is a writer and translator. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Art Amiss, Alchemy Journal of Translation, Jadaliyya, and Youth Leader magazine, among others.


  • Jorge Febles teaches Spanish American literature and culture at the University of North Florida. His publications center on Cuban and Cuban American literature. He translated Luis Lorente’s poems with the assistance of Lebanese American writer Hedy Habra, author of Under Brushstrokes and Flying Carpets.


  • Kate Ferguson earned her MA in interpreting and translation studies at the University of Leeds. Currently based in Istanbul, she works as an interpreter trainer at Boğaziçi University and freelance translator. 


  • Annalisa Nash Fernandez is a recent graduate of the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee’s MA in Language, Literature, and Translation program and lives in Connecticut.



  • Will Firth (www.willfirth.dewas born in 1965 in Newcastle, Australia. He studied German and Slavic languages in Canberra, Zagreb, and Moscow. Since 1991 he has lived in Berlin, where he works as a translator of literature and the humanities (from Russian, Macedonian, and all variants of Serbo-Croat). His best-received translations of recent years have been Robert Perišić‘s Our Man in Iraq, Andrej Nikolaidis’s Till Kingdom Come, and Faruk Šehić’s Quiet Flows the Una



  • Anne O. Fisher is the translator of three books by Ilf and Petrov. Her translation of Ksenia Buksha’s The Freedom Factory will appear this fall.


  • Stuart Friebert recently published Puppets in the Wind: Selected Poems of Karl Krolow (Bitter Oleander Press), his third Krolow collection. His translation of Be Quiet: Selected Poems of Kuno Raeber will appear from Tiger Bark Press in 2015. Floating Heart, Friebert’s thirteenth volume of poems, has just been published by Pinyon Publishing.


  • Bruce Fulton (b. 1948) is co-translator with Ju-Chan Fulton of numerous volumes of modern Korean fiction, most recently River of Fire and Other Stories, by O Chŏnghŭi (Columbia University Press), and the novel How in Heaven’s Name, by Cho Chŏngnae (MerwinAsia). He teaches Korean literature and literary translation in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia.


  • An Albanian American poet and translator, Ani Gjika is author of Bread on Running Waters (Fenway Press, 2013). Her work appears in AGNI Online, Seneca Review, Salamander, Fishousepoems.org, and elsewhere.


  • Adam J. Goldwyn is an assistant professor of English at North Dakota State University, where he specializes in Greek literature. His article “Joseph Eliyia and the Jewish Question in Greece: Zionism, Hellenism, and the Struggle for Modernity” appeared in the October 2015 issue of Journal of Modern Greek Studies.


  • Carolyn González is an assistant professor of Spanish at the College of Idaho focusing on the study of Mexican and US Latino/a literature. She earned her PhD in Hispanic languages and literatures from the University of California, Los Angeles.


  • Anita Gopalan is a 2016 PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grant recipient. Her translations find place in Poetry International Rotterdam, MPT, Drunken Boat, Mantis, International Poetry Review, and elsewhere. 


  • Yasmeen Hanoosh is an Iraqi-born literary translator and Assistant Professor of Arabic language and literature at Portland State University. Her translations have appeared in various literary journals and publications, including Banipal and the Iowa Review. Her translation of the Iraqi novel Scattered Crumbs(al-Ramli) won the Arkansas Arabic Translation Prize in 2002, and has been excerpted in Literature from the Axis of Evil: Writing from Iran, Iraq, North Korea and Other Enemy Nations (2006). Her translation of Luay Hamza Abbas’s collection of short stories, Closing His Eyes, received the NEA translation prize in 2010.


  • Jonathan Harrington is a graduate of the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. His translation of Feliciano Sánchez Chan’s book Ukp’éel wayak’ (Seven Dreams) was published by New Native Press in 2014 (see WLT, Sept. 2014, 90). His own The Traffic of Our Lives won the Ledge Press Poetry Prize. He has lived in Yucatán, México, since 2002.



  • Kevin Haworth is the author of four books, including the essay collection Famous Drownings in Literary History. The director of the low-residency MFA program at Carlow University in Pittsburgh, he is at work on Rutu Modan: War, Love, and Secrets, a study of Israel’s leading graphic novelist.


  • Kathleen Heil’s stories, poems, essays, and translations have appeared in journals such as Guernica, Pear Noir!, Michigan Quarterly Review, Diagram, Gigantic, and The Barcelona Review



  • Photo by Laura Hernandez

    George Henson’s translations have appeared variously in Words Without Borders, The Kenyon Review, Asymptote, and World Literature Today, where he is a contributing editor. Most recently, Deep Vellum Publishing released his translation of Sergio Pitol’s The Magician of Vienna. He currently teaches Spanish and translation studies at the University of Oklahoma. 



  • Paul Holzman is a North American writer, translator, and musician living in Buenos Aires. He is currently translating Kike’s novel Que de lejos parecen moscas and investigating the mysterious Argentine composer Guindowsky. He can be read or heard at goodairyanki.blogspot.com.ar